Local High School Students Paint Campus Scenes during CCY Activities

On July 22, Center for Creative Youth student Kim Reynolds, 17, of Naugatuck Public High School, painted the courtyard located between Usdan University Center and the 41 Wyllys building.

On July 22, Center for Creative Youth student Kim Reynolds, 17, of Naugatuck Public High School, painted the courtyard located between Usdan University Center and the 41 Wyllys building.

Victoria Lee, 17, of Danbury High School, painted the south side of South College. CCY is a program of the Capitol Region Educational Council and is sponsored in collaboration with Wesleyan’s Center for the Arts. The approximately 150 high school students that come to Wesleyan for CCY reflect a diverse ethnic, economic, and cultural society. Students leave CCY with a better perspective on career and higher education choices. 

Victoria Lee, 17, of Danbury High School, painted the south side of South College. CCY is a program of the Capitol Region Educational Council and is sponsored in collaboration with Wesleyan’s Center for the Arts. The approximately 150 high school students that come to Wesleyan for CCY reflect a diverse ethnic, economic, and cultural society. Students leave CCY with a better perspective on career and higher education choices.

Paige Schmitt, 17, a rising senior at Watkinson School in Hartford, Conn. painted the Fayerweather building. Schmitt also is taking CCY classes on steel pan drums and Japanese Sumi-e painting this summer.

Paige Schmitt, 17, a rising senior at Watkinson School in Hartford, Conn. painted the Fayerweather building. Schmitt also is taking CCY classes on steel pan drums and Japanese Sumi-e painting this summer.

Christian Tarr, 17, is a high school student at the Greater Hartford Academy of the Arts. Tarr decided to draw the giant oak at the Center for the Arts because "it looked like the mightiest tree on campus."

Christian Tarr, 17, is a high school student at the Greater Hartford Academy of the Arts. Tarr chose this tree at the Center for the Arts because “it looked like the mightiest tree on campus.”