Lipton on Thinking Machines

Lauren RubensteinDecember 12, 20141min
<div class="at-above-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://newsletter.blogs.wesleyan.edu/2014/12/12/lipton-on-machine-intelligence/"></div>Lipton examines the continued relevance of the Turning Test of machine intelligence<!-- AddThis Advanced Settings above via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Advanced Settings below via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Advanced Settings generic via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Share Buttons above via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Share Buttons below via filter on get_the_excerpt --><div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://newsletter.blogs.wesleyan.edu/2014/12/12/lipton-on-machine-intelligence/"></div><!-- AddThis Share Buttons generic via filter on get_the_excerpt -->

James Lipton, professor of computer science, vice-chair of mathematics and computer science, spoke to the website Kill Switch about the “Turing Test.” Almost 65 years ago, Alan Turning, perhaps the first computer scientist, posed the question, “Can machines think?” and developed a test to answer this question. Given all the computing advances that have allowed machines to act more and more human, Lipton considered relevance of the Turing Test today.