Snapshots

Faculty, Students Mingle at Wesleyan Women in Science Gathering

On Feb. 15, the Wesleyan Women in Science group hosted Student-Faculty Tea for WesWIS students and female science faculty. The event took place inside the Van Vleck Observatory's library.

On Feb. 15, the Wesleyan Women in Science (WesWIS) group hosted a student-faculty tea for WesWIS students and female science faculty. The event took place inside the Van Vleck Observatory’s library. Women in Science is a student group composed of undergraduates, graduate students, postdocs, staff and faculty dedicated to issues affecting women in science. The group is open to all majors and genders.

Ukrainian Social Reform, Current Events Discussed through Panel, Concert

During "This Side of the Curtain: Ukrainian Resistance in Uncertain Times," held Feb. 20 in Memorial Chapel, speakers, musicians and dancers expressed current events in Ukraine, social reform, non-violent resistance, civic engagement, and social-environmental health through a panel discussion, keynote address and concert performance. 

During “This Side of the Curtain: Ukrainian Resistance in Uncertain Times,” held Feb. 20 in Memorial Chapel, speakers, musicians and dancers from Wesleyan and the local community — discussed current events in Ukraine, social reform, non-violent resistance, civic engagement, and social-environmental health through a panel discussion, keynote address and concert performance.

A Black Phoenix Rising Art Experience Premiered at Zilkha

A Black Phoenix Rising Art Experience was a creative collaboration of Wesleyan students, artist Ernesto Cuevas Jr., and Associate Professor of Science in Society, Sociology, and African American Studies Anthony Hatch (center right). It opened in the south gallery at the Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery on Feb. 22.


This exhibition was co-sponsored by the Center for African American Studies, the Center for the Humanities and the Center for the Arts’ Creative Campus Initiative, made possible with support from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

The projects began in Hatch’s fall 2017 seminar, Black Phoenix Rising, during his fellowship semester at the Center for the Humanities. Working with the Center’s theme of Rethinking Necropolitics, the class explored—through a collaborative process—the methods that African Americans used in order to resist material and symbolic death in American life and culture.

Grounded in the black radical tradition, each of the works in this multimedia exhibit was collaboratively conceived and produced through the power of collective memory and the medium of storytelling.

In the Shadows of Tomorrow brochure that accompanied the exhibit, the artists explain, “Our goal for this work is to embody the Black Phoenix by envisioning life cycles that do not end with . . . death. Instead, we utilize vignettes . . . to tell a story of religion, healing, and spirituality as sites of communal resistance.”

The opening provided a reunion for the class, as well as an invitation to have conversations with friends and community members about the issues raised in the artwork and displays.

The exhibition was on display Feb. 22-25.

Campus Honors Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at Commemoration

On Feb. 15, the campus community gathered in Crowell Concert Hall to celebrate the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. This year, 2018, also marks the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s death. The commemoration included a keynote address, a vocal transcript of King's baccalaureate address at Wesleyan in 1965, songs, and a reception at Malcolm X House.

On Feb. 15, the campus community gathered in Crowell Concert Hall to celebrate the life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. HON ’64. This year, 2018, also marks the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s death. The commemoration included a keynote address, an audio recording of King’s baccalaureate address at Wesleyan in 1965, songs and a reception at Malcolm X House.

Rothschild ’94 Speaks to Students about His Entrepreneurial Path

On Feb. 8, Tomer Rothschild '94 returned to campus to speak to students at the Gordon Career Center about his entrepreneurial path. Rothschild, who graduated from Wesleyan with a degree in philosophy, is the co-founder of Elite Scholars of China (ESC), an agency that aims to educate China's top high school students about their undergraduate options in the United States.

On Feb. 8, Tomer Rothschild ’94 returned to campus to speak to students at the Gordon Career Center about his entrepreneurial path. Rothschild, who graduated from Wesleyan with a degree in philosophy, is the co-founder of Elite Scholars of China (ESC), an agency that aims to educate China’s top high school students about their undergraduate options in the United States. He previously worked on Wall Street and as a China country manager of a publicly traded U.S. company, among other jobs. “Fumbling is necessary to find your path,” Rothschild said to the students. “Follow your passion—even if you don’t know what it is immediately. It took me seven years of working in different fields and jobs to finally figure out what I really wanted to do.”

A Body in Fukushima: Recent Work Exhibition on Display in Zilkha Gallery

On Feb. 1, the Center for the Arts hosted a reception for the exhibition "A Body in Fukushima: Recent Work Exhibition." A Body in Fukushima features photographs of dancer/performer Eiko Otake, the Menakka and Essel Bailey '66 Distinguished Visiting Scholar in the College of the Environment, made by Bill Johnston, professor of history, professor of East Asian Studies, professor of Science in Society and professor of environmental studies.

On Feb. 1, the Center for the Arts hosted a reception for A Body in Fukushima: Recent Work. The exhibition features photographs of dancer/performer Eiko Otake, the Menakka and Essel Bailey ’66 Distinguished Visiting Scholar in the College of the Environment, made by Bill Johnston, professor of history, professor of East Asian studies, professor of science in society and professor of environmental studies. On March 11, 2011, a tsunami and earthquake struck Japan causing three nuclear meltdowns at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan. More than 15,000 people died as a result of the natural disasters and 34 died while trying to evacuate following the release of radioactive materials.

Alumni, Friends Gather with President Roth in Honolulu, Denver

More than 30 alumni, students and friends gathered in Honolulu, Hawaii for a presidential reception with Wesleyan President Michael Roth. After being welcomed with a Hawaiian lei, President Roth gave a spirited update about Wesleyan and answered questions about the intensity of being a student and how Wesleyan is nurturing diversity through the Posse Scholars and by inviting other professors of the practice to campus.

More than 30 alumni, students and friends recently gathered in Honolulu, Hawaii, on Jan. 17 for a presidential reception with Wesleyan President Michael Roth. After being welcomed with a Hawaiian lei, President Roth gave a spirited update about Wesleyan and answered questions about the intensity of being a student and how Wesleyan is nurturing diversity through the Posse Veteran Scholars Program and by inviting professors of the practice to campus. The event took place at the New Otani Kaimana Beach Hotel.

Basinger Speaks to Staff about Film Studies, Musicals

Jeanine Basinger, the Corwin-Fuller Professor of Film Studies, spoke on her latest work during a luncheon for staff, Nov. 28 in Daniel Family Commons. Basinger, who has been employed at Wesleyan for 58 years, recently completed her 12th book manuscript with a working title of Musicals: History and Definition. The book tells the history of the musical and defines the genre.

Jeanine Basinger, the Corwin-Fuller Professor of Film Studies, spoke on her latest work during the Staff Luncheon Series Nov. 28 in Daniel Family Commons. Basinger, who has been employed at Wesleyan for 58 years, recently completed her 12th book manuscript with a working title of “Musicals: History and Definition.” The book tells the history of the musical and defines the genre. Basinger, who’s collected film memorabilia her entire life, said film studies is a relatively new field of study. “Film was officially born in 1895, it wasn’t until the 1960s that it began to become an academic field. Wesleyan was one of the pioneers; we were one of the first universities (in the country) to add it to our curriculum.”

Students Prepare for Final Exams, Winter Recess

On Dec. 11, Caroline Kravitz '19 studied for her HIST 203 Modern Europe exam at Exley Science Center. "My finals aren't until next Saturday, but I want to get a good head start," she said. "I like to study alone at first to prepare, but then I prefer to study in groups because you can learn so much more from your peers."

On Dec. 11, Caroline Kravitz ’19 studied for her HIST 203 Modern Europe exam at Exley Science Center. “My finals aren’t until next Saturday, but I want to get a good head start,” she said. “I like to study alone at first to prepare, but then I prefer to study in groups because you can learn so much more from your peers.”

This week, in preparation for final exams, hundreds of students are flooding Olin Library, Science Library, Exley Science Center, Usdan University Center and other quiet spots seeking an area to study in solitude, while others are collaborating with classmates in groups.

Undergraduate and graduate classes ended on Dec. 8. Reading Period was held Dec. 9-12 and final exams end at 5 p.m. Dec. 16.

University housing closes on Dec. 17 and re-opens on Jan. 23, 2018, and spring semester classes for Wesleyan undergraduates and graduates begins on Jan. 25. Graduate Liberal Studies courses begin on Jan. 29.

Wesleyan RJ Julia Bookstore Decorates, Hosts Events for the Holidays

This December, the Wesleyan RJ Julia Bookstore is decorated for the holidays and has a festive line up of activities and gifts for sale.

Santa Claus will read How the Grinch Stole Christmas! at the Wesleyan RJ Julia Bookstore on Dec. 16.

Santa Claus will read How the Grinch Stole Christmas! at the Wesleyan RJ Julia Bookstore on Dec. 16.

“Some of the most popular gifts this season are ‘Wesleyan’ embroidered fleece and sherpa jackets and the adorable knit Cardinal scarf with matching hat,” said RJ Julia Events Manager Liz Bartek. “Sweatshirts are always popular and students are buying W mugs and Moleskin journals to help prepare for exams.”

The bookstore hosted a Santa Letter Writing Workshops on Nov. 25 and Dec. 2. And on Dec. 7, the bookstore hosted a Holiday Appreciation Day for Wesleyan faculty and staff. Employees enjoyed refreshments while browsing the bookstore’s holiday catalog selections.

On Dec. 9, children were treated to a visit by City of Middletown Police Chief Bill McKenna and Don Freeman’s classic character, Corduroy the Bear. McKenna read stories, and at the end of the reading, Corduroy hosted a book signing party. Since 1968, this story of a small teddy bear waiting on a department store shelf for a child’s friendship has appealed to young readers generation after generation.

On Dec. 16, Santa Claus will read Dr. Seuss’s How the Grinch Stole Christmas!, and at the end of the reading, The Grinch will hold a book signing Read more.

Photos of the bookstore are below: (Photos by Caroline Kravitz ’19 and Rebecca Goldfarb Terry ’19)

Panel Addresses “Islamophobia in the Age of Trump”

The Wesleyan Refugee Project hosted a faculty panel on "Islamophobia in the Age of Trump" Dec. 7.

The Wesleyan Refugee Project hosted a panel discussion on “Islamophobia in the Age of Trump” on Dec. 7 in Usdan Univesity Center. Speakers included Peter Gottschalk, professor of religion, professor of science in society, director of the Office of Faculty Career Development; Patricia Rodriguez Mosquera, associate professor of psychology, associate professor of feminist, gender and sexuality studies; and Muslim Chaplain Sami Aziz.