Snapshots

August Blooms and Bees

Wesleyan’s campus is home to hundreds of flowers, shrubs, and trees that bloom throughout the summer. Pictured is a sampling of August’s blooms. (Photos by Olivia Drake)

A bee lands on a wild sunflower’s head in the West College Courtyard. The courtyard features more than 40 shrubs, dozens of fruit trees, two rain gardens, a rainwater catchment system, multiple woodchip pathways, three seating areas, a compost area, and hundreds of perennials that draw birds, insects, and other wildlife.

3rd Annual Scientific Imaging Contest Winners Announced

A magnified image of a fruit fly’s eye took first place in the third annual Wesleyan Scientific Imaging Contest in August.

The Wesleyan Scientific Imaging Contest recognizes student-submitted images—from experiments or simulations done with a Wesleyan faculty member—that are scientifically intriguing, as well as aesthetically pleasing. This year, 21 images were submitted from eight departments. The contest is organized by the College of Integrative Sciences as part of the summer research program.

The entries were judged based on the quality of the image and the explanation of the underlying science. The judges, a panel of four faculty members, were Brian Northrop, associate professor of chemistry; Ann Burke, professor of biology; Seth Redfield, associate professor of astronomy; and Renee Sher, assistant professor of physics.

The first-place winner received a $200 prize, the second-place winner received $100, and the two third-place winners received $50 each. Prizes were funded by the Office of Academic Affairs.

The winning images are shown below, along with scientific descriptions written by the students.

Emily McGhie ’20 took first prize with an image that depicts a mispatterning phenotype in the Drosophila (fruit fly) pupal eye at 40 hours after pupariation. “Such a phenotype was produced in the eye tissue by utilizing an RNA interference transgene to reduce the expression of hth—a gene that encodes the transcription factor Homothorax. Interommatidial pigment cells are shown in yellow and purple, and primary cells are shown in green and blue. In one image, incorrectly patterned cells are compared to correctly patterned cells: the mispatterned cells are highlighted in yellow and green, while correctly patterned cells are highlighted in purple and blue,” she said.

Doris Duke Foundation Supports ICPP’s Performing Artist Case Studies

This summer, students seeking a master’s degree in performance curation from Wesleyan’s Institute for Curatorial Practice in Performance (ICPP) are working on six performing artist case studies funded by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation.

On July 16, the ICPP Entrepreneurial Strategies class discussed their first artist — Becca Blackwell, an award-winning trans actor, performer and writer based in New York City. Blackwell is working with consultants and mentors at ICPP to develop a strategic framework for the next two to five years of their career. Blackwell will also be presenting their work at Wesleyan on October 5.

Photos of the class are below: (Photos by Richard Marinelli)

This summer, students seeking a master's degree in performance curation from Wesleyan's Institute for Curatorial Practice in Performance are busy taking classes. 

Sarah Wilbur and Paul-Bonin Rodriguez are teaching the Entrepreneurial Strategies course this summer.

Class of 2022 Welcomed at Summer Sendoffs Worldwide

Wesleyan’s newest students and their families are welcomed to the Wesleyan community during a series of Summer Sendoffs held July 19 to Aug. 15. Alumni and parents are hosting the events at various locations around the world including Boston; Beijing; Hong Kong; New York City; Mumbai; Seattle; Washington, D.C.; Philadelphia; and more.

All members of the Wesleyan community are invited to attend the casual socials. Pictured below are photos from a few of the gatherings.

Cecilia ’91 and Greg McCall hosted a Summer Sendoff in Fairfield, Conn. on Aug. 14.

Fairfield Sendoff hosted last night by Cecilia ’91 and Greg McCall.

 

Carmen Cheung ’05 and Alecia Ng ’14 organized the Hong Kong Summer Sendoff on July 19.

Wesleyan Tennis Courts Renovated, Opened for Public Use

In 2017, Wesleyan and the City of Middletown partnered together on a project to rehabilitate and upgrade the Vine Street Tennis Courts. And on June 8, the courts were officially re-dedicated during a ribbon-cutting ceremony. Participants included William Russo, director of Middletown Public Works; Lorenzo Marshall, Middlesex Chamber of Commerce; Seb Giuliano, Common Council; Cathy Lechowicz, director of recreation and community services for the City of Middletown; Gerald Daley, Common Council; Daniel Drew, Mayor; Eugene Nocera, Common Council' Wesleyan President Michael Roth and State Representative Matt Lesser ’10. 

Last year, Wesleyan and the City of Middletown partnered together on a project to rehabilitate and upgrade the Vine Street tennis courts. And on June 8, the courts were officially rededicated during a ribbon-cutting ceremony. Participants included William Russo, director of Middletown Public Works; Lorenzo Marshall, Middlesex Chamber of Commerce; Seb Giuliano, Common Council; Cathy Lechowicz, director of recreation and community services for the City of Middletown; Gerald Daley, Common Council; Daniel Drew, mayor; Eugene Nocera, Common Council; Wesleyan President Michael Roth; and State Representative Matt Lesser ’10.

Wesleyan Inducts 6 Alumni to 2018 Baseball Wall of Fame

Wesleyan’s Baseball Wall of Fame boasts five years of inductees, along with historical players pre-1931. The idea for the wall originated with Todd Mogren ’83 and Tom Miceli ’81 in 2014, says Coach Mark Woodworth ’94. ”It was a perfect concept to celebrate the long history of success of the players in the program,” says Woodworth. ”In turn, we immediately started inducting classes and holding a yearly dinner/induction ceremony with alumni, players, and parents. It was a running joke every year that we would eventually figure out a physical ‘Wall of Fame,’ while in actuality, we could never quite figure out where and how to do it.” With its need to be portable, the project presented a creative challenge, noted Woodworth, “but this year, Harvey Ricard from Connecticut Stage Supply agreed to custom-build a wooden faux-brick backstop that would be portable and satisfy the unorthodox curves and unique demands.” The backstop is stored safely all summer, fall, and winter, but every spring, the Wesleyan Baseball Wall of Fame will be visible every day at Andrus Field. (Photo courtesy Mark Woodworth)

On May 4, Wesleyan Baseball Coach Mark Woodworth ’94 inducted six new members into the Wesleyan Baseball Wall of Fame. Also inducted was a historical class of eight alums who graduated between 1866 and 1931 who were instrumental in the early years of the program. This year, a new brick backstop was built not only for the field, but to serve as an actual “Wall” for the Wall of Fame.

Cassidy, Veteran Posse Students View Newest Film by Junger ’84

On May 22, 2018, aboard the aircraft carrier the USS Intrepid (now a National Historic Landmark), Retired Officer Teaching Fellow Robert Cassidy (third from left, blue jacket) and several members of the Wesleyan Veteran Posse, along with two students from Cassidy’s class, enjoyed a screening of Going to War. This documentary film, for which Sebastian Junger ’84 served as co-executive producer, explores the experience of serving in the military during war through interviews with veterans. Junger (third from right; back row, suit jacket) took questions from the audience—including the Posse group—and met with the Wesleyan contingent separately, posing for this photo. “Michael Freiburger ’21, one of our Posse veteran students asked Junger, ‘How do we find better ways to communicate who we are and what we feel about having been at war?’” recalls Cassidy. “I think there was a mutual respect between the veterans and Junger, who spent almost a year in the Korengal Valley, a very rough place in Afghanistan.” Some of the Posse veterans who attended hope to plan more events next year to explore this question further, in order to cultivate a shared understanding among traditional Wesleyan students and Wesleyan’s veteran students. (Photo courtesy Robert Cassidy)

 

Students Showcase Design and Engineering Projects

Final projects for Introduction to Design and Engineering (IDEA 170 in the Integrated Design, Engineering, and Applied Sciences Minor) included a bicycle powered by a chainsaw motor; reusable, lockable shipping boxes requiring no tape; an electricity-producing dance floor; and the “solar rover”—solar panels with storage batteries mounted on wheels and designed for long-term use around the University as a mobile power source for events and solar power education.

Taught by Professor of Physics Greg Voth, who chairs the department, and Assistant Professor of the Practice in Integrative Sciences Daniel Moller, the course offered 16 students the opportunity to work collaboratively on project-based studies at the intersection of design, the arts, and engineering. The course is part of a new interdisciplinary minor, the Integrated Design, Engineering, and Applied Sciences (IDEAS) program, hosted and administered by the College of Integrative Sciences (CIS).

Professor of Physics and Director of the CIS and the IDEAS program Francis Starr noted, “These projects are amazing examples of what Wesleyan students can do when given the skills and opportunity to creatively explore design and engineering. And I think this is why we have already seen about 30 students enroll in the new IDEAS minor in just its first year. I can’t wait to see what next year brings.”

Moller concurs: “IDEA 170 is a great opportunity for students to explore an open-ended design and fabrication environment, to recognize the technical challenges of putting ideas into action, and to learn about themselves as designers.”

(Photos by Cynthia Rockwell and Daniel Moller)

The Chainsaw Bike Group—Asim Rahim ’19, Jake Abraham ’20, Eiji Frey ’20, Coby Gesten ’19 (pointing to Professor Moller)—attached a chainsaw motor to power a bicycle.

Alumni Coordinate Campus Visit with 7th Graders

 

On June 7, seventh graders from Alma del Mar Charter School in New Bedford, Mass. visited Wesleyan to get a glimpse of college life.

On June 7, seventh graders from Alma del Mar Charter School in New Bedford, Mass., visited Wesleyan to get a glimpse of college life. The field trip was arranged by Will Gardner ’02, executive director of the school.

Alma del Mar employees and Wesleyan alumnae Amelia Tatarian ’13, a seventh grade teacher, and Taylor DeLoach ’13, dean of culture, led the Wesleyan tour. “I enjoy giving scholars a love of math, as well as connecting with them on a personal level. As a teacher, you are influencing them; every day you are watching them become the people they will grow to become,” Tatarian said. 
As an undergrad, DeLoach was active with Wes Reads, Wes Writes and worked with Associate Professor of Psychology Anna Shusterman and other Wesleyan students to found Kindergarten Kickstart, a preschool program at Macdonough School. (Photos by Olivia Drake)

 

Alumni, Students Celebrate 150 Years of Argus

On May 26, a Wesleyan Argus 150th Anniversary Celebration was held at Russell House during Reunion & Commencement Weekend. Current students and alumni, who contributed to the Argus from the 1970s through the present day, shared memories, caught up with old friends, and discussed the state of journalism today. (Photos by Tom Dzimian and Olivia Drake.)

The reception was held at Russell House, and was co-sponsored by Wesleyan's Writing Certificate.

The reception was held at Russell House, and was cosponsored by Wesleyan’s Writing Certificate.

Senior Lacrosse Players Graduate Early Before Winning National Championship

Graduation came early this year for men’s lacrosse players for the best possible reason. With the team competing in the NCAA championship game on Commencement Sunday for the first time in the program’s history, graduating students missed the regular ceremony.

The graduating seniors, and one student receiving an MA in graduate liberal studies, received their degrees at a special ceremony in the Admission building, attended by President Roth and Provost Joyce Jacobsen, on Wednesday, May 23.

Also present were the families of the graduates, as well as Director of Athletics Mike Whalen and Vice President for Student Affairs Michael Whaley.

President Roth said, “This is a joyous occasion. You still have work to do, but that work gives us such pride, even awe.”

Seniors receiving the BA degree:
Nick Annitto
Jake Cresta
Ryan Flippin