Climate Change Topic of Photography Exhibit

NAME speaks about her photograph titled "NAME" during the opening reception for the exhibit <i>Photographic Window on Causes of Climate Change</i> Nov. 5 in Van Vleck Observatory.

Erin Arai, a graduate student in astronomy, speaks about her photograph of a commuter rail station during the opening reception for the exhibit Photographic Window on Causes of Climate Change Nov. 5 in Van Vleck Observatory. All photographs in the show were taken by students enrolled in Astronomical Pedagogy Seminar, and exhibited waste and carbon use excesses.

Bill Herbst, the John Monroe Van Vleck Professor of Astronomy, talks about his photograph of a vegetable-oil fuel diesel engine, which he titled "The Eggroll Machine."

Bill Herbst, the John Monroe Van Vleck Professor of Astronomy, talks about his photograph of a vegetable-oil fuel diesel engine, which he titled "The Eggroll Machine." Herbst co-teaches the course and contributed to the photo exhibit.

WHO talks about her photograph "TITLE." XX says she feeds her chickens food scraps and in return she "never has to buy eggs at the store."

Astronomy major Anna Williams '09 talks about her photograph of a rear bike wheel with leaves in the gear and spokes.

  	WHO explains how compact fluorescent light bulbs save energy. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, energy-saving bulbs use about 75 percent less energy than standard incandescent bulbs and last up to 10 times longer.

Astronomy major Karlen Shahinyan '10 explains how compact fluorescent light bulbs save energy. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, energy-saving bulbs use about 75 percent less energy than standard incandescent bulbs and last up to 10 times longer.

Exploring Global Climate Change from Science to Art initiative. Feet to the Fire classroom modules co-created by arts and non-arts faculty. (Photos by Olivia Bartlett)

The class was co-taught by photographer Marion Belanger, pictured in center, through Wesleyan's Feet to the Fire: Exploring Global Climate Change from Science to Art initiative. Feet to the Fire classroom modules are co-created by arts and non-arts faculty. The exhibit is open to the public and will be up until Dec. 14. (Photos by Olivia Bartlett)