Tag Archive for photography

Winners of the Wes in the World Photo Contest Announced

On Nov. 13, the Fries Center for Global Studies announced the winners of the 2017-18 Wes in the World Photo Contest. More than 200 Wesleyan students, staff, faculty and alumni voted on 56 images in five different categories, including landscape, people, contemporary issues, daily life and sports.

Photographs were submitted by international students and U.S. students who studied abroad.

View the winners below. View the honorable mentions online here.

“Cinque Terre Town” by Natalie Strassheim, ‘18 / Manarola, Italy “I was ready to capture some of my own awesome photos by embarking on a solo trip. I remember, in Pompeii, saying farewell to my study abroad friends. I boarded the train, heading off to my next stop in Italy. This was the beginning to feeling independent. This was the start to feeding my wanderlust.”

BEST PHOTO OF LANDSCAPE: “Cinque Terre Town” by Natalie Strassheim ‘18, Manarola, Italy. “I was ready to capture some of my own awesome photos by embarking on a solo trip. I remember, in Pompeii, saying farewell to my study-abroad friends. I boarded the train, heading off to my next stop in Italy. This was the beginning to feeling independent. This was the start to feeding my wanderlust,” she said.

Photographs by Albert MALS ’94 Exhibited in Olin Library

Hillcrest Orchards © 2016 Nancy Ottmann Albert

Hillcrest Orchards © 2016 Nancy Ottmann AlbertNancy Ottmann Albert’s (MALS ’94) evocative photographs of vanishing New England structures and landscapes will be featured in “Documents in Black and White,” a new exhibition opening in Olin Library on Oct. 5, 2016. The show is being presented in conjunction with the formal announcement of Albert’s gift of her papers to the library’s Special Collections & Archives (SC&A).

Nancy Ottmann Albert’s (MALS ’94) evocative photographs of vanishing New England structures and landscapes will be featured in “Documents in Black and White,” a new exhibition opening in Olin Library on Oct. 5, 2016. The show is being presented in conjunction with the formal announcement of Albert’s gift of her papers to the library’s Special Collections & Archives (SC&A).

Albert will speak about her work at 7 p.m. Oct. 28 in the library’s Develin Room.

Selected by the artist, the works span the 30 years she spent documenting New England’s built environment. Inspired by Walker Evans and the 1930s Farm Security Administration photographers, she began to photograph textile mills and industrial sites throughout New England in 1981. Shooting black and white film in a medium format camera, she returned over the years to record the buildings’ decline and disappearance.

Further exploration led her to seek out other endangered structures and landscapes. These include mental institutions emptied by changing philosophies of treatment and a commissioned study of Long River Village, Middletown’s oldest housing project, prior to its demolition.
The exhibition also contains images of roadside and urban vernacular architecture, barns and abandoned homesteads, filling stations, and drive-in theaters. All of the work, which includes gelatin silver photographs, was printed by the artist.

In 2014, Albert donated her papers to SC&A. Her papers include images taken in New England, France, Cuba, Portugal, Spain, London, Italy, Eastern Europe, Vienna, Barcelona, Bosnia, Slovenia, Croatia and Berlin, along with her research notes. The papers are now freely available for research and are described in an online finding aid. The gift will be formally acknowledged prior to her Oct 28. talk.

“Documents in Black and White” will be on view from Oct. 5 through Dec. 16, 2016, in the SC&A exhibition cases on the first floor of Olin Library during normal library hours. For more information, call 860-685-3863 or e-mail sca@wesleyan.edu.

‘Photographing Ina’: Exhibition by Trager ’56 Opens at the Davison Art Center

Photographing Ina, an exhibition of work by Phil Trager ’56 and based on one of his two news books, opened at the Davison Art Center on March 24. It will run through May 22.

“Philip Trager: Photographing Ina,” an exhibition of work by Phil Trager ’56, Hon. ’08, P’81, GP’11, and based on his new book, opened at the Davison Art Center on March 24. It will run through May 22. Pictured are Ina and Philip Trager.

The exhibition, like the book, has two parts. The first is a series of immaculately composed black-and-white photographs taken in the 1980s, after 25 years of marriage. The second part, taken in the last decade after 50 years of marriage, reveals Trager's new color photography—an unexpected and tender meditation on the act of photographing, on perception, color, and light.

The exhibition, like the book, has two parts. The first is a series of immaculately composed black-and-white photographs taken in the 1980s, after 25 years of marriage. The second part, taken in the last decade after 50 years of marriage, reveals Trager’s new color photography—an unexpected and tender meditation on the act of photographing, on perception, color, and light.

Haverford Hosts Belanger’s “Rift/Fault” Photography Series

Marion Belanger, an instructor in Graduate Liberal Studies, is currently displaying her photography series “Rift/Fault” at Haverford College. The series is two dozen photography pairings of the North American continental plate, which stretches from California to Iceland. In an intersection of geology and art, the display walks a viewer through images of plate tectonics and the stories that they tell.

More information about the gallery, including dates and hours of operation, can be found here.  Samples of her photography are below:

One of Belanger's photo pairings in her "Rift/Fault" series.

belanger-rift-fault-2

One of Belanger's photo pairings in her "Rift/Fault" series.

Photography by McDonald ’88 in 2 Group Shows

Anne Arden McDonald '88

Anne Arden McDonald ’88

Photographer and sculptor Anne Arden McDonald ’88  has self portraits included in a group show, The Mind’s Eye: Sight and Insight, at the Hewitt Gallery of Art, Marymount Manhattan College (221 East 71st Street), in New York City. The show runs through December 5. The artists in this exhibition have a special relationship to their creative process both through the neurological (perception/sight) and the psychological (interpretation/insight).  Information on exhibition

Her work also appears in another group show, Mad Hatters to Pixel Pushers, at the Projective Eye Gallery of the UNC Charlotte College of Arts + Architecture, UNC Charlotte City Center, in Charlotte, NC, that runs through next week. The exhibit focuses on contemporary photographers from the southeast and beyond who use alternative processes, gelatin silver photography, digital imaging, and photo sculpture with the “constructed image. Information on exhibition

McDonald is one of the artists included in the Critical Mass top 50, a competition run by Photo Lucida.

Her work has appeared this year in the books Eyemazing: The New Collectible Art Photography (Thames and Hudson) and Jill Enfield’s Guide to Alternative Processes (Focal Press). She also was one of the 14 finalists for the Clarence John Laughlin Award, given by the New Orleans Photo Alliance.

McDonald’s web site

Untitled Self Portrait #25 by Anne McDonald

Untitled Self Portrait #25 by Anne McDonald

Cells by Anne Arden McDonald, 2007, 69 x 50 ins. silver gelatin print

Cells by Anne Arden McDonald, 2007, 69 x 50 ins. silver gelatin print

Yamashita ’71 Travels to Tibet for a New Photo Collection

Michael Yamashita ’71

Acclaimed National Geographic photographer Michael Yamashita ’71 has just published a new book of photographs Shangri-La: Along the Tea Road to Lhasa (White Star Publishers). His latest photography collection is a rare, intimate look into the Tibet’s changing world—both ancient and modern, sacred and commonplace, the rarefied and the gritty—before the legends and mysteries of the Chamagudao, the Tea Horse Road, disappear into the Tibetan mist.

Book by Michael Yamashita ’71

Yamashita captures stunning images of the Tea Horse Road, which winds through dizzying mountain passes, across famed rivers like the Mekong and the Yangtze, and past monasteries and meadows in a circuitous route from Sichuan and Yunnan provinces in western China to the Tibetan capital city of Lhasa. As modern-day Chinese culture merges with and even absorbs Tibetan traditions, the Tea Horse Road is a relic of a vastly different time. The Chinese are rapidly paving dirt roads to make highways for cars and trucks. Soon there will be little evidence of this once vital trade route.

Yamashita recently talked about his book at the Asia Society in New York City. You can hear his talk here and see a slide show of his work here.

Read more on Yamashita’s blog.

Sumzanling Monastery in today’s Shangri-La. Photo by Michael Yamashita ’71

Photography Book of Civil Rights Movement Has Text by Dickson ’61

Book by Jim Wallace and Paul Dickson '61

Courage in the Moment: The Civil Rights Struggle, 1961–1964 (Dover Publications) is a remarkable book of photographs by Jim Wallace, accompanied by a written narrative by Paul Dickson ’61. While many mainstream Southern newspapers ignored the burgeoning civil rights movement in the early 1960s, student journalists from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill bravely ventured out every day to document protest marches and other demonstrations in their town. Jim Wallace was one of these students, and he took memorable photographs primarily during the watershed year of 1963.

His pictures contain powerful scenes from a new American revolution, ranging from peaceful sit-ins and protest marches to dramatic confrontations with the authorities, to disturbing images from a Ku Klux Klan rally. Wallace was astute enough to photograph the pivotal 1963 March on Washington, and images from that memorable event are also included here.

In this moving account, Wallace recalls those dramatic days in detail and offers insightful reflections on his photographs and his memories of the people and events he captured. Many of these pictures have never been seen before. The text by Dickson and the images combine to create a vibrant document of the American civil rights movement.

Jim Wallace is a former director/curator of imaging and photographic services at the Smithsonian Institution, where he worked for three decades. His photographs have appeared in publications serviced by United Press International as well as in the Charlotte Observer and Newsweek. Paul Dickson has written more than 60 books, many of them concentrating on writing about the American language, baseball, and 20th-century American history.

Photography by Yamashita ’71 Featured in National Geographic

Photo by Michael Yamashita '71.

Beautiful new work by veteran photographer Michael Yamashita ’71 may be viewed online in the May issue of National Geographic. His photos accompany an article “The Forgotten Road” by Mark Jenkins who traces the remnants of the legendary trail in China that served as a trading route for tea and Tibetan horses.

The ancient passageway once stretched almost 1,400 miles across the chest of Cathay, from Yaan, in the tea-growing region of Sichuan Province, to Lhasa, the almost 12,000-foot-high capital of Tibet.

East Asian Studies Celebrates Freeman Family Garden with Exhibit

Patrick Dowdey, curator of the Freeman Center for East Asian Studies, adjunct professor of East Asian Studies and anthropology, welcomed guests to the opening of "Shoyoan: Celebrating the Freeman Family Garden" March 31 in the Freeman Gallery. The exhibition features photographs, poetry and video that celebrate time and season in Wesleyan's Freeman Family Garden and Tatami Room.

Patrick Dowdey, curator of the Freeman Center for East Asian Studies, adjunct professor of East Asian Studies and anthropology, welcomed guests to the opening of "Shoyoan: Celebrating the Freeman Family Garden" March 31 in the Freeman Gallery. The exhibition features photographs, poetry and video that celebrate time and season in Wesleyan's Freeman Family Garden and Tatami Room.