HIV Discoverer Levy ’60 Delivers Biophysics Retreat Keynote Address

Wesleyan’s Molecular Biophysics Program Hosted its 15th Annual Retreat Sept. 18 at the Wadsworth Mansion in Middletown. Wesleyan faculty and alumni delivered talks at the day-long event. (Photos by Jennifer Langdon)

Jay Levy '60 M.D., professor of medicine and research associate at the Cancer Research Institute at the University of California, School of Medicine at San Francisco (UCSF), delivered the keynote address titled "HIV Discovery to Research Achievements and Future Challenges."

Jay Levy ’60 M.D., professor of medicine and research associate at the Cancer Research Institute at the University of California, School of Medicine at San Francisco (UCSF), delivered the keynote address titled “HIV Discovery to Research Achievements and Future Challenges.”

For the past 30 years, Dr. Levy has been a leader in AIDS research starting with his independent discovery of the AIDS virus, HIV, in 1983. A fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he has received numerous awards for his work including the Award of Distinction from the American Foundation for AIDS Research. Dr. Levy is currently editor-in-chief of the scientific journal AIDS and is the author or editor of 14 books on viruses and immunology, and over 600 scientific articles and reviews. His current research focuses on developing immune-based therapies for the treatment and prevention of AIDS.

For the past 30 years, Dr. Levy has been a leader in AIDS research starting with his independent discovery of the AIDS virus, HIV, in 1983. A fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he has received numerous awards for his work including the Award of Distinction from the American Foundation for AIDS Research. Dr. Levy is currently editor-in-chief of the scientific journal AIDS and is the author or editor of 14 books on viruses and immunology, and over 600 scientific articles and reviews. His current research focuses on developing immune-based therapies for the treatment and prevention of AIDS.

Mike Robinson, assistant professor of psychology, assistant professor of neuroscience and behavior, spoke on "Optogenetically Targeting Desire."

Mike Robinson, assistant professor of psychology, assistant professor of neuroscience and behavior, spoke on “Optogenetically Targeting Desire.”

Edwin Antony Ph.D. '05, assistant professor of chemistry at the University of Utah, spoke on "ATP Driven Nitrogen Reduction by Nitrogenase - a Two Cylinder Molecular Machine."

Edwin Antony Ph.D. ’05, assistant professor of biochemistry at the University of Utah, spoke on “ATP Driven Nitrogen Reduction by Nitrogenase – a Two Cylinder Molecular Machine.”

Colin Aitken ’03, a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institutes of Health, spoke on Intermediate Events During Eukaryotic Translation Initiation, and the Role of eIF3."

Colin Aitken ’03, a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institutes of Health, spoke on Intermediate Events During Eukaryotic Translation Initiation, and the Role of eIF3.”

During the retreat, several Wesleyan students presented their ongoing research at a poster session. Photos of the poster session are below:

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