Olivia Drake

Patricelli Center Fellows Celebrate Year-Long Pilot Program

The 2016-17 Patricelli Center Fellows jumped for joy during their end-of-the-year celebration on May 9.

The 2016-17 Patricelli Center Fellows jumped for joy during their end-of-the-year celebration on May 9. (Photos by Olivia Drake)

In Fall 2016, the Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship launched a for-credit, cohort-style, project-based fellowship program (CSPL 264 and 265) for 36 students. And on May 9, the fellows celebrated the success of the pilot program during a group lunch and discussion.

stu_patricelli_2017-0509111055Among the fellows are Alexandra Bacchus ’17, who is working to create a platform for day laborers to connect with potential employers in a safe and trustworthy way to combat job insecurity and low pay.

Nebiyu Daniel ’18 is expanding health education in his hometown of Garamuleta, Ethiopia through his organization, Rural Access.

Iraqi refugee Ahmed Badr ’20 is using the power of storytelling to empower youth worldwide through his creative expression platform, narratio.org.

Shantelle Brown ’19 is empowering adolescent Jamaican girls to deconstruct violent and oppressive cultural norms through sisterhood and creative expression.

Etenish Abebe ’17, Jamilia Simon ’17 and Aliya Lyons ’17 are building a user-centered two-sided marketplace to connect freelance hairstylists to clients.

Joshua Nodiff ’19 is creating a nonprofit called Power To The People that seeks to implement energy democracy through urban environmental design.

Through his enterprise, Be The Change Venture, Anthony Price ’20 is connecting Cleveland’s youth and empowering them to be leaders in their community.

Learn more about all the fellows online.

The Patricelli Center is accepting applications for the 2017/2018 Fellowship. For more information, visit bit.ly/patricelli-fellowship.

Alumnae Participate in Networking Event for Women Student-Athletes

The mission of the Athletics Advantage (A+) Program is to grow, connect and develop a diverse network of alumni leaders online and through campus programs and events that will inspire, connect and prepare student-athletes for post-Wes life.

On May 7, 20 alumnae returned to campus to participate in a speed networking event for women student-athletes in various stages of their post-Wes journey.

They included: Blair Ingraham ’14; Alicia White ’15; Glenn Hartman-Mattson ’14; Andrea Balkan ’86; Vanessa Block ’15; Michele Drossner ’14; Erin Reding Glaser ’06; Fran Rivkin ’78; Lottie Barton ’16; Corinne Rivard ’16; Lisa Brummel ’77; Nicole Butterfield; ’90; Marisa Graziano P’19; Cindy Nye ’87; Meg Dunham Dempsey ’85, P’19; and Rebecca Hall ’04.

Learn more about the A+ online network. (Photos by Gabe Hurlock ’20)

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105 Students Present Research at QAC Spring Poster Session

On May 5, 105 students presented their quantitative analysis research during a poster session in Beckham Hall.

The Quantitative Analysis Center (QAC) hosts a poster session twice a year, which doubles as a final exam evaluation for its QAC 201 course. Nineteen evaluators, of which seven were Wesleyan-affiliated, attended and judged the projects. Students also had the opportunity to share their projects with fellow students, faculty, staff, alumni and friends of Wesleyan.

In this project-based course, students learned to answer questions through independent research based on existing data. Students developed skills in generating testable hypotheses, conducting a literature review, preparing data for analysis, conducting descriptive and inferential statistical analyses, and presenting research findings.

Zehua (Jack) Wang '20 presented his story on "The Relation between Region and Diameter of Impact Craters on Mars."

Zehua (Jack) Wang ’20 presented his study on “The Relation between Region and Diameter of Impact Craters on Mars.”

Media and Power in Latin America Course Concludes with Pop-Up Exhibit

On May 4, six Wesleyan students presented a pop-up exhibition titled "From Amate to Artists' Books: Crafting Community through Media in Latin America" in Olin Library's Special Collections & Archives. The student curators included Lauren Salazar '17, Brooke Kushwaha '20, Nate Barton '18, Marcos Plaud Rivera '18, Leah Cabrera '17 and Caroline Diemer '18

On May 4, six Wesleyan students presented a pop-up exhibition titled “From Amate to Artists’ Books: Crafting Community through Media in Latin America” in Olin Library’s Special Collections & Archives. The student curators included Lauren Salazar ’17, Brooke Kushwaha ’20, Nate Barton ’18, Marcos Plaud Rivera ’18, Leah Cabrera ’17 and Caroline Diemer ’18. All of the objects in this exhibition shed light on how media artifacts have served as tools for forging and imagining communities in Latin America. The objects date from the Pre-Columbian era to the 21st century, and range in form from stone tools, to photography and artist books. Together, they shed light on how media have been used as components in the construction of empire, to resist political systems of power, and to negotiate individual and collective identity.

Students Present Academic Research at Poster Sessions

Hundreds of Wesleyan students had the opportunity to present their academic research at various poster sessions in March and April. Posters often contain text, graphics and images that illustrate the students’ research results on a single board. Poster session attendees can view the posters and interact with the author.

This year, the Psychology Department, College of the Environment, Biology Department, Neuroscience and Behavior Program, Natural Sciences and Mathematics Division, Quantitative Analysis Center and the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences hosted poster sessions.

Photos of the poster sessions are below: (Photos by Olivia Drake, Caroline Kravitz ’19 and Rebecca Goldfarb Terry ’19)

Kylie Moynihan ’17 presented “Testing the Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Model of Franks et al.." Her advisor is Dana Royer, chair and professor of earth and environmental sciences.

On April 21, Wesleyan’s Natural Sciences and Mathematics Division hosted a Celebration of Science Theses, a poster session featuring the work of Honors and MA students in the NSM fields. During the event, Kylie Moynihan ’17 presented her thesis research titled “Testing the Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Model of Franks et al..”

Psychology graduate student Lucy De Souza examined “Honor and Masculinity Among Latinos and European-Americans.” De Souza’s faculty advisor is Patricia Rodriguez Mosquera, associate professor of psychology.

On April 27, the Psychology Department hosted a poster session in Beckham Hall. Psychology graduate student Lucy De Souza presented her poster on “Honor and Masculinity Among Latinos and European-Americans.”

Doggo Meet and Greet Helps Students De-stress before Finals

Doggo Meet and Greet, April 29 at Wesleyan University.

Cloie Logan ’17 and Eliana Zimmerman ’17 snuggle Fika, a Danish Swedish Farmdog, at the Doggo Meet and Greet, April 29.

April 29 was a dog-gone good day for more than 150 students and 13 dogs as they gathered together at the Center for the Arts Green for a Doggo Meet and Greet.

Sara Dean ’17, a self-proclaimed “dog lover,” created the event and advertised it on Facebook. She invited Wesleyan students, staff and faculty to bring their pooches to campus.

“It hit me that there are a lot of students with emotional support dogs on campus,

102 Students Present Research at Psychology Poster Session

The Psychology Department hosted a research poster presentation April 27 in Beckham Hall. More than 102 students presented 46 posters.

The Psychology Department hosted a research poster presentation April 27 in Beckham Hall. One-hundred-and-two students presented 46 posters, 12 more than last year.

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Tima Zeng ’17 presented her research titled “Increased Structural and Functional Connectivity in Jazz Musicians.” Zeng’s advisor is Psyche Loui, assistant professor of psychology, assistant professor of neuroscience and behavior.

Wesleyan Celebrates Arbor Day with 45 New Tree Plantings

This spring, crews are planting new trees at multiple locations on campus. 

This spring, crews are planting new trees at multiple locations on campus.

In honor of Arbor Day on April 28, Wesleyan is celebrating the planting (or proposed planting) of more than 45 new trees on campus in 2017.

Pale-pink blossoming cherry trees, a hardy pin oak, an endangered dawn redwood and a Chinese lobed-leaf Ginkgo biloba are among the new perennial plantings peppered across the Wesleyan landscape.

Since trees become a permanent fixture, Grounds Manager Rob Borman takes many factors into consideration before tilling up any soil and planting roots.

He notes the history of campus; the existing tree canopy; what trees will thrive in Connecticut’s climate; proximity to buildings, sidewalks and roads; surrounding landscape; how it would affect snow plowing, mowing and other grounds maintenance; and benefits to the environment.

“We also consider the Wesleyan tour route and high visibility areas, and we always value feedback from the Wesleyan community,” Borman said. “All of this is considered both for time of planting, as well as the tree’s full maturity.”

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Click to enlarge the 2017 campus tree map.

The trees and their planned locations include:
One birch cluster in front of the Freeman Athletic Center;
Two Norway spruce on Warren Street near the Freeman Athletic Center;
23 Yoshino cherry trees along Vine Street;
Eight Kwanzan cherry trees near West College;
Two red maples, two red oaks and one pin oak near the Foss residences;
One Ginkgo in front of the Public Affairs Center;
Two paper bark maples, a birch cluster and dawn redwood between the Davison Art Center and Davison Health Center;
Two paper bark maples near the Center for African Studies;
One red maple across from Alpha Delta Phi;
One hybrid elm in front of Judd Hall;
And one red oak in the center of College Row.

Since 2014, Borman has led the effort to plant more than 230 trees and shrubs on campus.

Wesleyan’s efforts have contributed to the City of Middletown receiving an Arbor Day Foundation Tree City USA designation for 27 years.

While many trees grow up, others come down.

“We try to avoid cutting down existing trees at all costs,” Borman explained. “If we remove a tree, it’s because the tree has died, it was injured due to a storm, it is too close to structures or construction projects, or it is a safety hazard to the community. We always try to plant one tree for every felled tree.”

Wesleyan grounds will continue to plant more species in the fall.

Eight Kwanzan flowering cherry trees are planted near the West College Courtyard. They will be in full bloom in early May.

Eight Kwanzan flowering cherry trees are planted near the West College Courtyard. They will be in full bloom in early May.

Wesleyan Refugee Project Hosts Panel, Exhibit on Refugee Resettlement

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The Wesleyan Refugee Project is hosting an exhibit, “Stronger Shines the Light Inside” at the Center for the Arts Green. SSTLI traces processes of refugee resettlement though a series of photographs and interviews with the refugee community in Boise, Idaho.

On April 21, the Wesleyan Refugee Project (WRP) hosted a speaker panel in Memorial Chapel about refugee resettlement. WRP is a student-led group dedicated to volunteering, advocating, fundraising, and raising awareness of current refugee crises. The team works with a number of international and local nonprofit organizations, assisting in areas such as tutoring, legal aid, and refugee resettlement.

Angie Smith, a photographer based in Los Angeles, Calif. and the founder of Stronger Shines the Light Inside (SSTLI), delivered the keynote address. SSTLI traces processes of refugee resettlement though a series of photographs and interviews with the refugee community in Boise, Idaho. Smith spoke about the inception, development and execution of SSTLI, refugee resettlement in the U.S., using photography to tell impactful stories, and applying skills from a liberal arts college in the real world to create new initiatives promoting social justice and change. During her presentation she shared a series of photographs from the project that have been featured in numerous publications online and in print including National Geographic, WIRED, The New Republic, and The New York Times Magazine. She also read excerpts from interviews that accompanied the photographs.

In addition, brothers Maher Mahmood and Mahmood Mahmood spoke about their experiences with resettlement in Connecticut. Both described their journey from Iraq to Connecticut

Wesleyan Emeritus College Offers Theses Supervised by Retired Faculty

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The Wasch Center, located on Lawn Ave., is launching the new Wesleyan Emeritus College this spring.

Starting next fall, the Wasch Center for Retired Faculty will begin a two-year pilot program, “Wesleyan Emeritus College,” to encourage thesis tutorials between undergraduates and retired faculty members.

During this pilot, 11 retired faculty participants have been specifically approved to administer tutorials for credit by their parent departments.

Richard Elphick, professor of history, emeritus, taught at Wesleyan from 1972 to 2015. His interests are African history, comparative imperialism, revolutions, theory of history, and the history of Christianity. “I would be interested in supervising theses focusing on the following areas: History of Christianity, Africa (especially South Africa), imperialism, World War I and II, Cold War,” he said.

Jack Carr, professor of theater, emeritus, worked at Wesleyan from 1984 to 2015. He was the lighting and scene designer for the Theater Department, and a professional designer for productions in New York, the United Kingdom, Bucharest, Romania and Russia. His interests include lighting, design for dance and theater, and theater history. At Wesleyan, he taught Introduction to Production, Lighting Design, Designing for the Computer, and has already advised hundreds of thesis productions.

Fundraiser Supports Historic Russell Chapel Restoration May 20

The Russell Chapel is located on the southwest hill of Indian Hill Cemetery in Middletown near Wesleyan.

The Russell Chapel is located on the southwest hill of Indian Hill Cemetery in Middletown near Wesleyan. Constructed of Portland Brownstone and embellished with small brownstone carvings, the Russell Chapel notably houses its original Meneely Bell, forged in Troy, N.Y. in 1868. Its interior is adorned with notable stained glass windows and elegant woodwork in need of refurbishing.

On May 20, All American Productions and The Friends of Indian Hill Cemetery are proud to present “From Gothic to Light: A Day of Art, History, Music and Fashion.” This fundraiser, held 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., will benefit the restoration of The Russell Chapel, which is located on the grounds of Indian Hill Cemetery, 383 Washington Street, Middletown.

The day will include:

  • A drawing class outdoors on the grounds of the cemetery led by Kate Ten Eyck, visiting assistant professor of art. Included in this 90 minute activity are large vintage postcards with a blank front, and all supplies needed to create a beautiful drawing of the chapel. Ten Eyck will offer instruction in composition, perspective, and shading. All levels of drawing welcome and encouraged. Start time is 10:15 a.m.
  • A Gothic Fashion Show, to lead off from the entrance of the chapel, featuring incredible attire courtesy of Redfield Design. Start time is noon.
  • Live music courtesy of the The Latin Quarter Jazz Collective.
  • Civil War presentation at the Grand Army of the Republic and General Mansfield’s gravesite.
  • Notable tours of the cemetery every half hour throughout the day.
  • See the current restoration progress of the chapel.

This event is family friendly, and food and refreshments will be available on site.

Although this is a free event, donations are encouraged! All money raised will go directly to the restoration and rehabilitation of the chapel, built in 1867. For more information visit this Facebook event.

Any Wesleyan students, alumni or employees who would like help preserve a piece of Middletown’s celebrated past, may make a donation to the Russell Chapel Rehabilitation Fund. Memorial gifts and multi-year pledges are welcome, as are designated gifts.

To make a gift or to learn more about the history of the chapel, visit http://indian-hill.org/chapel/.