Snapshots

Earth and Environmental Science Seniors Conduct Research in Hawaii

Sixteen earth and environmental science majors from the Class of 2020 recently conducted field research in Hawaii as part of their Senior Field Research course.

The class, E&ES 498, is taught by Tim Ku, chair and associate professor of earth and environmental sciences, and Suzanne O’Connell, professor of earth and environmental sciences. The course is open to students who completed E&ES 497: Senior Seminar, and focuses on improving scientific research skills.

Past classes have conducted research in Death Valley, Calif., the main island of Puerto Rico, the Connecticut River Valley, and the Big Island of Hawaii. The field research took place on the Big Island of Hawaii on Jan. 5-12 and the course concluded with student group presentations on March 3 and 5 and written reports.

The trip was funded by the Lawrence H. Davis ’76 Fund.

The students and their project titles are below:

Emmy Hughes, Avery Kaplan, Haley Brumberger, and Shuo Wang worked on a project titled "Assessing Microplastic Accumulation and Distribution on Four Beaches in Hawaii.

Shuo Wang, Haley Brumberger, Emmy Hughes,and Avery Kaplan worked on a project titled “Assessing Microplastic Accumulation and Distribution on Four Beaches in Hawaii.”

Emily Litz, Jackie Duckett, Miles Brooks, Katie Toner, and Allegra Grant worked together on a project titled "Coffee Soils: Carbon Source or Sink?"

Emily Litz, Jackie Duckett, Katie Toner, Miles Brooks, and Allegra Grant worked together on a project titled “Coffee Soils: Carbon Source or Sink?”

Middletown Public School Students Display Artwork at Wesleyan

The 39th annual Middletown Public Schools Art Exhibition was on exhibit from March 7-15 at the Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery. The show featured a wide variety of visual art from children in Kindergarten through 12th grade.

The 39th annual Middletown Public Schools Art Exhibition was on view from March 7–15 at the Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery. The show featured a wide variety of visual art from children in Kindergarten through 12th grade.

The exhibition was sponsored by the Middletown Board of Education, Middletown Public Schools Cultural Council, and Wesleyan University's Center for the Arts. Due to the threat of the coronavirus, the show was closed to the public on March 13-15.

The exhibition was sponsored by the Middletown Board of Education, Middletown Public Schools Cultural Council, and Wesleyan University’s Center for the Arts.

Students Engage with Google Employees through Career Virtual Panel

On Feb. 27, the Gordon Career Center hosted a Google Career Virtual Panel featuring Wesleyan alumni who offered insight on their roles in sales, business, product management, marketing, legal issues, and other roles at Google.

The panel was assembled by Sherry Liang ’20, who completed a WEShadow at Google last winter, and Peer Career Advisor Esmye Lytle ’21.

Speakers included:

Aaron Stoertz '03

Aaron Stoertz ’03

Aaron Stoertz ’03: Stoertz graduated with a BA in English. Since then he worked in conservation biology, public health, and international health policy at the World Health Organization before landing in tech, where he’s worked his way into a position as a product manager at Google Health.

Terry Wei ’07: Wei has 13 years of experience in public relations and communications. She currently leads communications for Waze, the world’s leading crowdsourced navigation app. Previously, Wei was head of public relations at Squarespace and managed product communications at Mercedes-Benz. Originally from California, Wei studied English at Wesleyan and graduated in 2007.

Paul Vidich ’72, P’00, ’03 Discusses Espionage Novel at Wesleyan RJ Julia Bookstore

Paul Vidich

Paul Vidich ’72, P’00, ’03 spoke about his new book, The Coldest Warrior, on Feb. 24 at the Wesleyan RJ Julia Bookstore. The espionage novel, published by Pegasus Crime in February 2020, explores the dark side of intelligence that is exposed when a CIA officer delves into a cold case from the 1950s―with fatal consequences.

Paul Vidich

Many of those who attended Vidich’s talk were friends and fellow members of Wesleyan’s Class of 1972. Vidich, a College of Social Studies (CSS) major, said, “What I learned at CSS was critical thinking and healthy skepticism, but not cynicism. I think I’m a skeptical person, but I also think that every generation goes through periods in which government disappoints. … Skepticism, to me, is a healthy way of looking at the world, and my characters in the novel are intentionally skeptical.”

Students Enjoy Spring-Like Temperatures in Late February

Several students took advantage of the 60-plus degree temperatures and warming sun rays Feb. 24 on campus. While some students enjoyed outdoor study time in solitude, others rode bikes and skateboards, played with flying discs, had lunch, and enjoyed socializing under the sun. (Photos by Olivia Drake)

students outside

students outside

Best of Wes: Campus Exhibits

Wesleyan boasts several exhibits on display this month that are open to the public and are free of charge. View a collection of architect Henry Bacon’s campus plans and building designs, student artwork, professional photographs, a cardboard-art installation, an experimental musical commemoration of Beethoven’s 250th birthday, and more!

Be sure to check out the following exhibits as they are the best of Wes! (Photos by Olivia Drake)

RING FAMILY LOBBY DISPLAY CASE:

usdan cases

The Ring Family Lobby display case, located on the first floor of Usdan University Center, features artwork by students in the Printmaking I (ARST 237) and Beginning Japanese Printmaking Woodblock Technique (ARST 261) classes. The classes were taught during the fall 2019 semester by Alexander Osborn, visiting assistant professor of art, and Keiji Shinohara, artist-in-residence.

artwork

Nicole Rizutto ’20 created this artwork in the Japanese Printmaking class.

OLIN LIBRARY:

Olin Library is celebrating Black History Month with several book displays, and the Wesleyan Music Department community is commemorating the 250th birthday of Ludwig van Beethoven (1770–1827) with an inspired, diverse mix of traditional and experimental tributes. Stop by to browse books about Ludwig van Beethoven, view his musical scores, and experience Leif Inge’s sound installation 9 Beet Stretch (2002), which stretches Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony into a 24-hour recording.

Materials sourced from Wesleyan's Henry Bacon Collection are displayed in Olin Library's new display cases located in the basement. Architect Henry Bacon, best known for designing the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C., also helped shape the Wesleyan campus. He designed Wesleyan's Eclectic Society building (1907); the Skull and Serpent Society building (1914); Clark Hall (1916); the Van Vleck Observatory (1916); and provided the initial designs for Hall Laboratory (1927, now raised) and Olin Library (1928). The exhibit showcases Bacon's work on the Lincoln Memorial, correspondence letters, and work on Wesleyan's campus.

Materials sourced from Wesleyan’s Henry Bacon Collection are displayed in Olin Library’s new display cases, located in the basement. Architect Henry Bacon, best known for designing the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C., also helped shape the Wesleyan campus. He designed Wesleyan’s Eclectic Society building (1907); the Skull and Serpent Society building (1914); Clark Hall (1916); and the Van Vleck Observatory (1916), pictured; and provided the initial designs for Hall Laboratory (1927, no longer standing); and Olin Library (1928).

Graduate Student McNeill Speaks on the Social, Cultural Aspects of the Black New Orleans Brass Band

graduate student speaker

As part of Wesleyan’s Graduate Speaker Series, Marvin McNeill, a PhD candidate in ethnomusicology, spoke about “Structures of Feeling and the Significance of Affectivity in the Social and Cultural Survivals of the Black New Orleans Brass Band,” on Feb. 7 in Exley Science Center.

McNeil explained how the institution of the Black New Orleans brass band represents a genealogic continuum that extends back to the arrival of the first enslaved Africans to the Louisiana Territory. "This continuum connects a violent past, marked by physical abuse of black bodies in the form of institutionalized slavery, to a violent present confounded by systemic poverty, social injustice, and police brutality," he said. In spite of extreme oppression, the brass band community continues to enrich and enliven both local communities through their iconic musical offerings.

McNeill explained how the institution of the Black New Orleans brass band represents a genealogic continuum that extends back to the arrival of the first enslaved Africans to the Louisiana Territory. “This continuum connects a violent past, marked by physical abuse of black bodies in the form of institutionalized slavery, to a violent present confounded by systemic poverty, social injustice, and police brutality,” he said. “In spite of extreme oppression, the brass band community continues to enrich and enliven both local communities through their iconic musical offerings.”

Bree Newsome Leads Wesleyan’s Martin Luther King Celebration

MLK

Bree Newsome delivered the keynote address at Wesleyan’s MLK celebration.

On Jan. 31, the Wesleyan community celebrated the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with a commemoration and program. This year, artist, writer, producer, and activist Bree Newsome delivered the event’s keynote address.

Newsome drew national attention in 2015 when she climbed the flagpole in front of the South Carolina Capitol building and removed a confederate battle flag. She was arrested for her actions. The flag was originally raised in 1961 as a racist statement of opposition to the Civil Rights movement and lunch counter sit-ins occurring at the time. Newsome’s act of defiance against the culture of white supremacy has been memorialized in photographs, artwork, and film, and has become a symbol of resistance and the empowerment of women.

Students, Alumni Attend Meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Hawaii

American Astronomical Society in Hawaii

Ismael Mireles MA ’19, Rachel Marino ’20, Katharine Hesse MA ’20, Justin Perea MA ’20, Gil Garcia ’20, Hunter Vannier ‘20, Fallon Konow ’20, and David Vizgan ’21 gathered for a photo at the American Astronomical Society in Hawaii in January.

Seth Redfield, Hunter Vannier (BA ‘20), Fallon Konow (BA ‘20)

Seth Redfield poses with his students, Hunter Vannier ’20 and Fallon Konow ’20, at a poster session.

Several Wesleyan undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and alumni attended the 235th American Astronomical Society meeting in Honolulu, Hawaii, Jan. 4–8, 2020.

“The meeting was a huge success, and we were thrilled to have such a large contingent of Wesleyan students able to attend and present their research,” said Seth Redfield, associate professor and chair of astronomy.

Wesleyan McNair Fellow Rachel Marino presented a poster titled “HD106906 Debris Disk Morphology and Origin of an External Perturber.” Her advisor is Meredith Hughes, associate professor of astronomy.

Hunter Vannier ’20 shared his research titled “Mapping the Local Interstellar Medium: Using Hubble to Look Back at the ISM along the Sun’s Historical Trajectory.” His advisor is Seth Redfield.

Wesleyan McNair Fellow Gilberto Garcia ’20 shared his poster titled “From Einstein to Chandra: Dramatic long-term X-ray variability in AGNs.” His advisor is Ed Moran, professor of astronomy.

Fallon Konow ’20 presented “Constructing a Survey of the Local Interstellar Medium using Hubble Spectra.” Her advisor is Seth Redfield.

David Vizgan ’21 presented a project titled “Using [CII] luminosity as a tracer of gas mass @ z=6,” which was based on work from a summer research program in Copenhagen.

Graduate student Justin Perea presented a poster titled, “Emission-line active galaxies and the Cosmic X-ray Background.” His advisor is Ed Moran.

Graduate student Katharine Hesse spoke on “Removing (and Using!) Contaminating Field Stars Around Bright K2 Targets.” Her advisor is Seth Redfield.

Alumni attending included Ismael Mireles MA ’19, Amy Steele MA ’14, Raquel Martinez MA ’13, and Chris Dieck MA ’08.

Redfield and Ilaria Carleo, a postdoctoral researcher in the Astronomy Department, also attended the meeting.

Athletics Hosts 5th Annual Women in Sports Clinic for Area Girls

On Jan. 25, Wesleyan Athletics held its fifth annual National Girls and Women in Sports Day Clinic. More than 130 local girls—from kindergarten to sixth grade—participated in this free event.

Several coaches from women’s teams and student-athletes taught the clinic and introduced the girls to softball, soccer, field hockey, rowing, track, tennis, and more.

“Our female student-athletes did a fantastic job in being role models for our local youths,” said Christine Kemp, head field hockey coach and assistant strength and conditioning coach. “The girls had a blast and had the opportunity to try out a number of sports all morning.”

The clinic was held in conjunction with the Annual National Girls and Women in Sports Day. This celebration inspires girls and women to play and be active, build confidence and character, and become strong leaders in sports and life.

The event concluded with a pizza party.

Photos of the clinic are below: (Photos courtesy of Wesleyan Athletics)

girls camp

girls in sports camp

Alumnae Lead Women’s Athletics Mentoring Workshop for Wesleyan Athletes

On Jan. 26, the Athletics Department welcomed 25 alumnae back to campus for its annual Women’s Athletics Mentoring Workshop.

The alumnae met with female student-athletes to network and offer career advice.

The workshop was held in conjunction with the Annual National Girls and Women in Sports Day. This celebration inspires girls and women to play and be active, build confidence and character, and become strong leaders in sports and life.

Photos of the Athletic Mentoring Workshop are below: (Photos courtesy of Wesleyan Athletics)

alumni athletes

alumni athletes