Snapshots

Campus Blooms to Life in May

Wesleyan's campus is home to dozens of flowering shrubs, trees and blooming flower gardens.

Wesleyan’s campus is home to dozens of flowering shrubs, trees and blooming flower gardens.

Lily of the Valley grows near the President's House. Pictured in the background is the Archeology Department.

Lily of the Valley grows near the President’s House.

Red geraniums bloom behind Olin Library and face Fayerweather Hall and Usdan University Center.

Red geraniums face Fayerweather Hall and Usdan University Center.

Pots of geraniums line the top of Denison Terrace.

Pots of geraniums line the top of Denison Terrace.

Lilacs radiate a sweet smell near the Center for the Americas.

Lilacs radiate a sweet smell near the Center for the Americas.

Phlox blooms near the West College residences.

Phlox blooms near the West College residences.

Giant alliums grow near West College.

Giant alliums grow near West College.

Pink rhododendrons bloom near College Row.

Pink rhododendrons bloom near College Row.

A dogwood tree blooms near the Center for the Americas.

A dogwood tree blooms near the Center for the Americas.

Planted pansies bloom near Davison Art Center.

Planted pansies bloom near Davison Art Center.

Petunias, geraniums and other flowers are planted near Boger Hall.

Petunias and hosta are planted near Boger Hall.

Azalea bloom near Andrus Field.

Azalea bloom near Andrus Field.

Lupines grow in the West College courtyard, mimicking the steeple of Memorial Chapel. Lupines grow in the West College courtyard, mimicking the steeple of Memorial Chapel.

Lupines and phlox grow in the West College courtyard, mimicking the steeple of Memorial Chapel. (Photos by Olivia Drake)

Boger Hall, Gordon Career Center, The West Wing Dedicated During R&C Weekend

During Reunion & Commencement Weekend, the Wesleyan community celebrated the dedications of three prominent areas of campus with ribbon-cutting ceremonies. They include Boger Hall (formerly 41 Wyllys), the Gordon Career Center (located inside Boger Hall), and The West Wing of Usdan University Center.

Trustees, emeriti trustees, leadership donors and volunteers, and members of the Wesleyan community celebrated the dedication of Boger Hall, named for Joshua Boger ’73, P’06, ’09 and Amy Boger P’06, ’09 in recognition of their extraordinary leadership, service, and generosity. This event was held in conjunction with the Leadership Donor and Volunteer reception. (Photo by Jonas Powell '18)

Trustees, emeriti trustees, leadership donors and volunteers, and members of the Wesleyan community celebrated the dedication of Boger Hall, named for Joshua Boger ’73, P’06, ’09 and Amy Boger P’06, ’09 (second and third from right) in recognition of their extraordinary leadership, service, and generosity. (Photo by Jonas Powell ’18)

Alumni Reflect on Reunion Visit

Davenports.

David ’88 and Monica Davenport.

New York, N.Y. resident David Davenport ’88 visited campus with his wife, Monica. David is serving on the Board of Trustees through 2018. “It’s great to be back on campus. I’m so proud of all the honorees at the Annual Meeting of the Alumni Association. Luke Wood’s talk was a great story about the marriage of old culture—records—to the current music media—digital. My wife was saying that this might apply to our son. He’s 13, and into Magic, a unique kind of counterculture. Luke’s story of how you can study the counterculture through different educational disciplines—and actually enjoy it—is inspiring.” Monica enjoyed soaking up the campus activity. “I feel like I missed something by not coming here,” she said. David majored in government at Wesleyan and was a member of Psi Upsilon.

New Jersey residents Myra Wrubel P’85, P’88 and Charlie Wrubel ’59 P’85 P’88 enjoy returning to Wesleyan to see how the campus has grown. “I like the camaraderie of the people during Reunion,” Charlie said. Charlie, who served as a Wesleyan Trustee from 2013-16 majored in government and was on the swimming and diving team.

Students Toss Objects from Exley’s Roof during Big Drop

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In 1589, Galileo dropped balls of various sizes from the Leaning Tower of Pisa to demonstrate that they all hit the ground at the same time. On May 4, Wesleyan students repeated this experiment in modern-day way at Exley Science Center. Several Wesleyan students, staff and faculty observed the “big drop.”

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Hanna Elszasz ’18, Sam Sheppe ’18, and Bill Nelligan, director of environmental services, dropped objects from the roof of Exley Science Center. In this test, the group used a Mac and PC.

Refugees’ Art Featured at Student-Run “Art in Crisis” Exhibit

The student-run Wesleyan Refugee Project is hosting an exhibit titled "Art in Crisis" through May 22 at the Center for the Humanities. Student organizers, faculty, members of the administration and artists gathered for the exhibit's opening May 4.

The student-run Wesleyan Refugee Project is hosting an exhibit titled “Art in Crisis” through May 22 at the Center for the Humanities. Student organizers, faculty, members of the administration and community members gathered for the exhibit’s opening May 4.

“Art in Crisis” features work by artists within Za'atari Refugee camp, the largest refugee camp in Amman, Jordan, home to over 100,000 refugees. These artists range from professionals who taught art in Syria to youth who were studying modern art to those who newly developed their passion in exile. The work was recently displayed at the Mission to the United Nations in New York City, and will be sold in a silent auction format.

“Art in Crisis” features work by artists within Za’atari Refugee camp, the largest refugee camp in Amman, Jordan, home to over 100,000 refugees. These artists range from professionals who taught art in Syria to youth who were studying modern art to those who newly developed their passion in exile. The work was recently displayed at the Mission to the United Nations in New York City, and will be sold in a silent auction format.

The Wesleyan Refugee Project is a volunteer initiative which centers around three central community outreach efforts, including online tutoring with Syrian refugee students in Turkey and Jordan, helping Connecticut-based refugees fill out subsidized housing and energy assistance applications, and aiding Iraqi refugees in finding U.S. employment via the International Refugee Assistance Program. Pictured is volunteer Elisabeth Arslanoglou '16.

The Wesleyan Refugee Project is a volunteer initiative which centers around three central community outreach efforts, including online tutoring with Syrian refugee students in Turkey and Jordan, helping Connecticut-based refugees fill out subsidized housing and energy assistance applications, and aiding Iraqi refugees in finding U.S. employment via the International Refugee Assistance Program. Pictured is volunteer Elisabeth Arslanoglou ’16.

Wes Sailing Team Hosts First Inter-Collegiate Regatta

On April 30, the Wesleyan University Sailing Team hosted their first ever inter-collegiate regatta on Lake Pocotopaug in East Hampton, Conn. After a morning of little to no wind, the afternoon picked up and the students were able to sail eight races.

Wesleyan seniors and co-captains Katie Walker ’16, Kevin Winnie ’16 and Rachel Kurlander ’16 sailed their last college regatta at the event, which was sponsored by the New England Intercollegiate Sailing Association.

Bates College, Sacred Heart, and Fairfield University also participated, with Bates taking first place in the regatta. Wesleyan took third. (Photos courtesy of Wesleyan Sailing Team)

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Students Meet Astronaut Jemison at Sturm Lecture

Dr. Mae Jemison, an astronaut, physician, Peace Corp. volunteer and dancer, delivered the annual Sturm Lecture April 19 in the Ring Family Performing Arts Hall. Her topic was "Exploring the Frontiers of Science and Human Potential." 

Dr. Mae Jemison, an astronaut, physician, Peace Corp. volunteer and dancer, delivered the annual Sturm Lecture April 19 in the Ring Family Performing Arts Hall. Her topic was “Exploring the Frontiers of Science and Human Potential.” Jemison’s sister, Dr. Ada Jemison, majored in biology at Wesleyan in 1974.

Neuroscience Program Holds Undergraduate Research Symposium, Poster Session

The Neuroscience and Behavior (NSB) Program hosted their third annual undergraduate research symposium April 29 in Daniel Family Commons. Senior thesis writers delivered 10-minute scientific presentations during a dinner with fellow NSB students and faculty. Students also showcased their finest scientific projects during a research poster session, pictured below: (Photos by Ryan Heffernan ’16)

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“Wes Out-Loud” Theater Performance Takes Audience on Site-Specific Auditory Journey

During the "Wes Out-Loud" performance, audience members wore wireless headsets to listen to recorded stories of place created for various sites on campus.

During the “Wes Out-Loud” performance, audience members wore wireless headsets to listen to recorded stories of place created for various sites on campus.

The Theater Department presented “Wes Out-Loud: Stories of Place” April 28 on campus.

“Wes Out-Loud: Stories of Place” is a site-specific auditory journey conceived and created for the Wesleyan campus through a collaboration between theater students and Assistant Professor of Theater Marcela Oteíza. “Wes Out-Loud” invited the audience to experience Wesleyan as a scenographic space by inserting new narratives into everyday sites.

The juxtaposition of place and stories presented the richness and diversity of the students on campus and promoted inclusiveness.

Audience members wore wireless headsets to listen to the recorded stories of place created for each site. The performance, led by Wesleyan students, covered a one-and-a-half mile loop through campus.

The journey includes stories of current students who wrote a piece specific to Wesleyan and the space that Wesleyan occupies.

“Wesleyan is an intensely personal space to me. It is the place where I have experienced the most growth and had the most memorable experiences of my life thus far. Given its significance, the memories of Wesleyan are positive, negative, and everywhere in between,” said collaborator Jess Cummings ’17. “I wanted to focus on disparities between positive and negative, especially those which I often hide. I also wanted to emphasize the way that these memories take on a spatiality and transform the spaces which the original events occurred in. I hope that listening to my story, as well as everyone else’s, will allow members of our Wesleyan community and beyond to question their relationships to the spaces they inhabit everyday and recognize the lasting effects that memory and space leave on their lives.”

“Wes Out-Loud” was recorded with a binaural, 3D-surround-sound system — a method that emulates the workings of human auditory perception, explained Marcela Oteíza. “Utilizing an actual scale model of left and right ears, the recording system works with the premise that it is the architecture of our anatomy that dictates how we understand the sounds we hear,” she said.

Additional performances will take place on April 29, April 30 and May 1.

Students Teach Strawberry DNA Extraction Workshop at GSTLC

On April 25, the Green Street Teaching and Learning Center celebrated National DNA Day to commemorate the completion of the Human Genome Project in April 2003, and the discovery of DNA's double helix in 1953. During the nationally-celebrated event, students, teachers and the public had the opportunity to learn more about genetics and genomics.

On April 25, the Green Street Teaching and Learning Center celebrated National DNA Day to commemorate the completion of the Human Genome Project in April 2003, and the discovery of DNA’s double helix in 1953. During the nationally-celebrated event, students, teachers and the public had the opportunity to learn more about genetics and genomics.

At Green Street, biology major Taylor Matthew ’17 and East Asian studies major Erin Deleon ’17 and led a hands-on science activity for GSTLC’s Discovery AfterSchool students.

At Green Street, biology major Taylor Matthew ’17 and East Asian studies major Erin Deleon ’17 and led a hands-on science activity for GSTLC’s Discovery AfterSchool students.

COE Hosts Community Discussion on Middletown’s Future

On April 26, the College of the Environment hosted a discussion on “Middletown/Mattabesset and the Connecticut River: Past, Present and Future” in the Community Health Center in Middletown. Several Wesleyan staff and faculty attended, along with members of the Middletown community.

On April 26, the College of the Environment hosted a discussion on “Middletown/Mattabesset and the Connecticut River: Past, Present and Future” in the Community Health Center in Middletown. Several Wesleyan staff and faculty attended, along with members of the Middletown community.

Panelist Stephen Devoto, professor of biology, professor of neuroscience and behavior, is a community activist who is a member of the Middletown Planning and Zoning Commission.

Panelist Stephen Devoto, professor of biology, professor of neuroscience and behavior, is a community activist who is a member of the Middletown Planning and Zoning Commission.

The panelists shared short vision statements on Middletown’s past, present and future and discussed what will and should the Middletown/Mettabesset look like in 50 years. Panelists welcomed questions and comments from the audience.

The panelists shared short vision statements on Middletown’s past, present and future and discussed what will and should the Middletown/Mettabesset look like in 50 years. Panelists welcomed questions and comments from the audience.

William “Vijay” Pinch served as the moderator. Pinch is professor of history, chair and professor of environmental studies. William “Vijay” Pinch served as the moderator. Pinch is professor of history, chair and professor of environmental studies.

William “Vijay” Pinch served as the moderator. Pinch is professor of history, chair and professor of environmental studies.

Other panelists included John Hall, founder and director of the Jonah Center for Earth & Art in Middletown; Erik Hesselberg, president of the Middlesex County Historical Society; Lucianne Lavin, director of research and collections for the Institute for American Indian Studies in Washington, Conn.; and Meg Walker, vice president of Project for Public Spaces in New York, NY.

Other panelists included Meg Walker, vice president of Project for Public Spaces in New York; Erik Hesselberg, president of the Middlesex County Historical Society; Lucianne Lavin, director of research and collections for the Institute for American Indian Studies in Washington, Conn. and John Hall, founder and director of the Jonah Center for Earth & Art in Middletown.

Attendees continued their conversation at a reception following the event. (Photos by Richard Marinelli)

Attendees continued their conversation at a reception following the event. (Photos by Richard Marinelli)