Snapshots

“Wes Out-Loud” Theater Performance Takes Audience on Site-Specific Auditory Journey

During the "Wes Out-Loud" performance, audience members wore wireless headsets to listen to recorded stories of place created for various sites on campus.

During the “Wes Out-Loud” performance, audience members wore wireless headsets to listen to recorded stories of place created for various sites on campus.

The Theater Department presented “Wes Out-Loud: Stories of Place” April 28 on campus.

“Wes Out-Loud: Stories of Place” is a site-specific auditory journey conceived and created for the Wesleyan campus through a collaboration between theater students and Assistant Professor of Theater Marcela Oteíza. “Wes Out-Loud” invited the audience to experience Wesleyan as a scenographic space by inserting new narratives into everyday sites.

The juxtaposition of place and stories presented the richness and diversity of the students on campus and promoted inclusiveness.

Audience members wore wireless headsets to listen to the recorded stories of place created for each site. The performance, led by Wesleyan students, covered a one-and-a-half mile loop through campus.

The journey includes stories of current students who wrote a piece specific to Wesleyan and the space that Wesleyan occupies.

“Wesleyan is an intensely personal space to me. It is the place where I have experienced the most growth and had the most memorable experiences of my life thus far. Given its significance, the memories of Wesleyan are positive, negative, and everywhere in between,” said collaborator Jess Cummings ’17. “I wanted to focus on disparities between positive and negative, especially those which I often hide. I also wanted to emphasize the way that these memories take on a spatiality and transform the spaces which the original events occurred in. I hope that listening to my story, as well as everyone else’s, will allow members of our Wesleyan community and beyond to question their relationships to the spaces they inhabit everyday and recognize the lasting effects that memory and space leave on their lives.”

“Wes Out-Loud” was recorded with a binaural, 3D-surround-sound system — a method that emulates the workings of human auditory perception, explained Marcela Oteíza. “Utilizing an actual scale model of left and right ears, the recording system works with the premise that it is the architecture of our anatomy that dictates how we understand the sounds we hear,” she said.

Additional performances will take place on April 29, April 30 and May 1.

(Photos below by Rebecca Goldfarb Terry ’19)

eve_wesoutloud_2016-0428160926 eve_wesoutloud_2016-0428161656 eve_wesoutloud_2016-0428162326 eve_wesoutloud_2016-0428163100 eve_wesoutloud_2016-0428163139 eve_wesoutloud_2016-0428163206 eve_wesoutloud_2016-0428163547eve_wesoutloud_2016-0428164303 eve_wesoutloud_2016-0428164509 eve_wesoutloud_2016-0428164647 eve_wesoutloud_2016-0428165125 eve_wesoutloud_2016-0428165826 eve_wesoutloud_2016-0428165941 outloudcollaborators

 

COE Hosts Community Discussion on Middletown’s Future

On April 26, the College of the Environment hosted a discussion on “Middletown/Mattabesset and the Connecticut River: Past, Present and Future” in the Community Health Center in Middletown. Several Wesleyan staff and faculty attended, along with members of the Middletown community.

On April 26, the College of the Environment hosted a discussion on “Middletown/Mattabesset and the Connecticut River: Past, Present and Future” in the Community Health Center in Middletown. Several Wesleyan staff and faculty attended, along with members of the Middletown community.

Panelist Stephen Devoto, professor of biology, professor of neuroscience and behavior, is a community activist who is a member of the Middletown Planning and Zoning Commission.

Panelist Stephen Devoto, professor of biology, professor of neuroscience and behavior, is a community activist who is a member of the Middletown Planning and Zoning Commission.

The panelists shared short vision statements on Middletown’s past, present and future and discussed what will and should the Middletown/Mettabesset look like in 50 years. Panelists welcomed questions and comments from the audience.

The panelists shared short vision statements on Middletown’s past, present and future and discussed what will and should the Middletown/Mettabesset look like in 50 years. Panelists welcomed questions and comments from the audience.

William “Vijay” Pinch served as the moderator. Pinch is professor of history, chair and professor of environmental studies. William “Vijay” Pinch served as the moderator. Pinch is professor of history, chair and professor of environmental studies.

William “Vijay” Pinch served as the moderator. Pinch is professor of history, chair and professor of environmental studies.

Other panelists included John Hall, founder and director of the Jonah Center for Earth & Art in Middletown; Erik Hesselberg, president of the Middlesex County Historical Society; Lucianne Lavin, director of research and collections for the Institute for American Indian Studies in Washington, Conn.; and Meg Walker, vice president of Project for Public Spaces in New York, NY.

Other panelists included Meg Walker, vice president of Project for Public Spaces in New York; Erik Hesselberg, president of the Middlesex County Historical Society; Lucianne Lavin, director of research and collections for the Institute for American Indian Studies in Washington, Conn. and John Hall, founder and director of the Jonah Center for Earth & Art in Middletown.

Attendees continued their conversation at a reception following the event. (Photos by Richard Marinelli)

Attendees continued their conversation at a reception following the event. (Photos by Richard Marinelli)

Wesleyan, Middletown Community Members Vote at Beckham Hall April 26

For the first time this year, Wesleyan’s Beckham Hall served at Middletown’s District No. 14 polling location for the presidential primary election held on April 26. District No. 14 encompasses most of the Wesleyan campus as well most of downtown Middletown.

According to Cathy Lechowicz, director of the Jewett Center for Community Partnerships, the District No. 14 polling location was at the Senior Center on Broad Street for many years. When the relocation and construction of a new Senior Center required the polling place to be moved, Middletown’s Registrar of Voters asked if Wesleyan would be willing to serve as the new location. With assistance and input of several offices on campus, Beckham Hall was identified as the best location. It will host a November election every year going forward, and may host one or two additional elections in April and/or in August or September.

Undergraduate and graduate students at Wesleyan have the option to vote via absentee ballot based on their home residence, or can choose to register in Middletown. Wesleyan’s Office of the Registrar maintains information on local voting.

Photos of the polling location in Beckham Hall are below: (Photos by Olivia Drake)

Voting for the Primary Election in Beckham Hall, April 26, 2016.
Voting for the Primary Election in Beckham Hall, April 26, 2016.
Voting for the Primary Election in Beckham Hall, April 26, 2016.
Voting for the Primary Election in Beckham Hall, April 26, 2016.
Voting for the Primary Election in Beckham Hall, April 26, 2016.
Voting for the Primary Election in Beckham Hall, April 26, 2016.

Psychology Students Share Research at 10th Annual Poster Presentation

Psychology Poster Session, April 28, 2016. (Photo by Olivia Drake MALS '08)

Assistant Professor of Psychology Clara Wilkins, pictured in back row center, gathered with her students during the Psychology Research Poster Presentation. The Wilkins Lab broadly examines prejudice, stereotyping, and the self.

Forty-six thesis and research students presented 36 posters during the Psychology Research Poster Presentation April 28 in Beckham Hall. The 10th annual event allowed the students to share their research and ongoing studies with peers and faculty from the Natural Sciences and Mathematics Division.

Photos of the poster presentation are below: (Photos by Olivia Drake MALS ’08)

Psychology Poster Session, April 28, 2016. (Photo by Olivia Drake MALS '08)

Psychology Poster Session, April 28, 2016. (Photo by Olivia Drake MALS '08)

Science, Mathematics Students Share Their Ongoing Research at Poster Session

On April 14, the final day of WesFest, a select group of Wesleyan students gathered in the Exley Science Center Lobby to share some of their research projects in the natural sciences and mathematics. This relatively small gathering represented only a fraction of the 150 students on campus actively engaged in natural science and mathematics research.

Harim Jung ’16 presented his research done with Cameron Arkin ’17, “Electrophysiological Correlates of Rhythm and Syntax in Music and Language.“ Their faculty advisor is Assistant Professor of Psychology Psyche Loui.

Harim Jung ’16 presented his research done with Cameron Arkin ’17, “Electrophysiological Correlates of Rhythm and Syntax in Music and Language.“ Their faculty advisor is Assistant Professor of Psychology Psyche Loui.

Rare Miniature Books Exhibited at Olin Library

Olin Library’s Special Collections & Archives hosted an exhibit, “A World in the Palm of your Hand: The Art of Miniature Books,” April 14. Examining miniature books, which are typically no larger than three inches, the program gave visitors the opportunity to view these treasures in both an exhibit and an open house.

The exhibit was curated by the Miniature Book Society (MBS), an international organization devoted to the appreciation of miniature books. These books are rarely encountered outside the personal collections of libraries or individuals. The event culminated with an address, titled “A Collection in a Shoebox,” by Jim Brogan, vice-president of MBS, and publisher of The Microbibliophile, a bimonthly journal about miniature books and the book arts.

(Photos by Rebecca Goldfarb Terry ‘ 19)

cam_oli_ins_2016-0413193330

Free Drawing Workshops Offered at 5th Annual Big Draw

On April 16, the Friends of the Davison Art Center presented “The Big Draw: Middletown,” the fifth annual community celebration of drawing with workshops designed for all skill levels, from beginning drawers to accomplished artists. The event took place at four locations across the campus including the Davison Art Center; the Center for the Arts; Fayerweather Beckham Hall; and the Usdan University Center.

“The Big Draw” included eight workshops facilitated by faculty and students from Wesleyan’s Art Studio Program in the Department of Art and Art History. Activities included developing narrative through drawing, drawing with inked feet to music, drawing from elaborate still lives of taxidermy and skeletons, using giant Spirograph-style drawing tools, face painting and more. Drawing study of nude models was open to adults, and minors with parental permission.

This year, “The Big Draw: Middletown” also featured a special Koinobori Project workshop led by Japanese artist Taichiro Takamatsu, who founded the project in 2012, and has led workshops creating carp flags in Australia, Austria, Germany, Japan, Kenya, Sri Lanka and Uganda.

More than 375 local artists participated, up from 286 in 2015. Forty-nine Wesleyan faculty, alumni, students and community members volunteered to teach participants and help run the program.

“The Big Draw: Middletown” is organized and hosted by the Friends of the Davison Art Center, with grant support from the Middletown Commission on the Arts; and special funding for the Koinobori Project from the Community Foundation for Middlesex County in conjunction with the Center for the Arts “Feet to the Fire: Riverfront Encounter.”

Other sponsors included Blick Art Materials, Community Health Center, CT Yoga Center, Middletown Framing, It’s Only Natural Market, Kidcity Children’s Museum, Middletown Toyota, Mondo Pizza, Munkittrick Associates, Nobul Apparel, Tesoro Artisan Gift Boutique & Gallery, and Ursel’s Web.

WTNH Channel 8 featured the event as one of eight fun things to do in Connecticut on the morning news on Friday, April 15, with live broadcasts.

(Photos below by Rebecca Goldfarb Terry ’19). View additional photos on the Big Draw Facebook page.

eve_bigdraw_2016-0415122521

President Emeritus Campbell Discusses “Thoughts on Citizenship” at Olin Library

President Emeritus Colin G. Campbell spoke to a crowded Smith Reading Room in Olin Library April 13 about “Thoughts on Citizenship.” Campbell, who served as president from 1970 to 1988, had visited the Allbritton Center prior to his talk and said the citizen engagement promoted by the Center is one of the most exciting activities he has seen on any campus.

President Emeritus Colin G. Campbell spoke to a crowded Smith Reading Room in Olin Library April 13 about “Thoughts on Citizenship.”
Campbell, who served as president from 1970 to 1988, had visited the Allbritton Center prior to his talk and said the citizen engagement promoted by the Center is one of the most exciting activities he has seen on any campus.

He spoke at length about the ethical obligations of educated citizens in a participatory democracy, and he took questions after. After Wesleyan, Campbell served as president of the Rockefeller Brothers Fund. He went on to serve as chairman, president, and chief executive officer of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, retiring in 2014 and now serving as chairman emeritus. His talk was sponsored by the Wasch Center for Retired Faculty.

He spoke at length about the ethical obligations of educated citizens in a participatory democracy, and he took questions after.
After Wesleyan, Campbell served as president of the Rockefeller Brothers Fund. He went on to serve as chairman, president, and chief executive officer of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, retiring in 2014 and now serving as chairman emeritus. His talk was sponsored by the Wasch Center for Retired Faculty.(Photos by Ryan Heffernan ’16)

Faculty Learn How to Enhance Their Online Profiles at CFCD Workshop

Through grants, workshops, seminars, publications, and formal and informal discussions, the Center for Faculty Career Development (CFCD) aims to cultivate dialogue among Wesleyan’s faculty and encourage association with faculty members at other academic institutions.

On April 12, about 25 faculty members attended a CFCD workshop titled “Becoming More Visible: Enhance Your Online Profile” in Usdan University Center. The workshop taught faculty ways to become more visible to colleagues, students and non-campus organizations by optimizing their work and presence online through search engine optimization as well as social media.

The workshop was taught by editor Naedine Joy Hazell MALS ’14 and Scott Johnson. Hazell has been editor-in-chief of The Hartford Courant, a three-time judge of the Pulitzer Prizes, editor of Hartford Magazine and New Haven Living and more. Johnson spent 25 years in journalism before moving into rebranding and strategy. Beginning as a graphic artist and designer, he then moved into newspaper redesign. He then moved from newspapers to the Associated Press in New York as director of graphics and visuals and authored the AP visual style guide. He currently works at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in the Strategy and Innovation Department.

(Photos by Tom Dzimian)
fac_workshop_2016-0412131946

Japanese Custom Celebrated at Cherry Blossom Festival

The College of East Asian Studies sponsored cherry blossom festival (Hanami) April 21 at the Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies. The annual event is attended by students taking Japanese courses, students from Japan and students and faculty who are interested in Japanese culture.

Hanami is the Japanese traditional custom of enjoying flowers (hana) and generally involves an outdoor celebration. This year, the group enjoyed sushi and other Japanese foods.

The event was sponsored by the College of East Asian studies and Japan Society.

(Photos by Rebecca Goldfarb Terry ’19)

cam_eas_2016-0421001748

PhD Candidate Frayne Speaks on Designing Dendritic Polymers

During the Graduate Student Speaker Series talk on April 20, Stephen Frayne, a PhD candidate in chemistry, spoke on "Designing Dendritic Polymers: From Theory to Experiment." Study and application of polymeric materials spans the physical, life, and applied sciences and has revolutionized nearly every facet of modern day society: medicine, transportation, construction, agriculture, and electronics, to name a few.

During the Graduate Student Speaker Series talk on April 20, Stephen Frayne, a PhD candidate in chemistry, spoke on “Designing Dendritic Polymers: From Theory to Experiment.” Study and application of polymeric materials spans the physical, life, and applied sciences and has revolutionized nearly every facet of modern day society: medicine, transportation, construction, agriculture, and electronics, to name a few.