Snapshots

Employees Sport Tie-Dye T-Shirts at Wesleyan

On June 1, the Office of Human Resources hosted an Ice Cream Social for faculty, staff and employed students to provide an opportunity for employees to mingle and celebrate the end of spring semester. As part of the day’s activities, employees were invited to create a tie-dye t-shirt.

On Aug. 10, Human Resources invited the tie-dye shirt makers to gather at Usdan’s Huss Courtyard for a brief meeting and photo opportunity.

“We thought this would be a fun way for employees to show off their ‘art work’ to the Wesleyan community,” said Julia Hicks, co-director of Human Resources. “It’s a very colorful day!”

Go Wes!

“Go Wes!”

1, 2, 3 … Jump!

1, 2, 3 … Jump! (Photos by Olivia Drake)

Green Team Hosts Mini-Bin Workshop

The Wesleyan Green Team hosted a mini-trash bin talk and workshop Aug. 10 at the Theater Department’s studio building. Dawn Alger, Theater Department administrative assistant and Green Team member led the workshop.

The Wesleyan Green Team hosted a mini-trash bin workshop and discussion Aug. 10 at the Theater Department’s studio building. Dawn Alger, Theater Department administrative assistant and Green Team member (pictured fifth from right, in back) led the workshop. “We’d love to see all staff and faculty members at Wesleyan use mini-bins in place of standard trash cans,” Alger said. “You’ll be surprised to see how little trash you create in a week.”

Mini-bins are small containers that are used in place of standard waste receptacles. They encourage recycling and reduce the number of trash can liners used on campus.

Mini-bins are small containers that are used in place of standard waste receptacles. They encourage recycling and reduce the number of trash can liners used on campus. Pictured are workshop participants Jordan Nyberg, program and events coordinator for the Office of Admission and Laura McQueeney, administrative assistant for the Office of Admission.

Jennifer Platt, manager of printing services, gets crafty with her mini-bin.

The Green Team provided craft supplies including cleaned coffee containers, colored paper, stickers, yarn, magazines, glue and scissors. Participants also discussed campus recycling efforts while designing their mini-bin. Pictured is workshop participant Jennifer Platt, manager of printing services.

Jen Kleindienst, sustainability director, decorates her mini-bin with magazine images.

Jen Kleindienst, sustainability director, decorates her mini-bin with cutouts from a magazine.

Olivia Drake, editor of The Wesleyan Connection and campus photographer, pastes recycle emblems to her mini-min.

Olivia Drake, editor of The Wesleyan Connection and campus photographer, pastes tree-shaped recycle emblems onto her mini-bin.

Liz Tinker, administrative assistant in the English Department, works on finalizing her mini-bin.

Liz Tinker, administrative assistant in the English Department, works on finalizing her mini-bin.

Wesleyan’s Green Team is researching, communicating, and implementing effective strategies that increase sustainability within the university. For more information on the team, or to join, visit the Green Team website.

Wesleyan Faculty Teach Local Girls about Science

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Ishita Mukerji, the Fisk Professor of Natural Science, professor of molecular biology and biochemistry, shows Girls in Science Summer Camp participant Sophie how to filter strawberry DNA on Aug. 2.  (Photo by Olivia Drake)

Wesleyan’s Green Street Teaching and Learning Center hosted the 2016 Girls in Science Summer Camp for 4th, 5th, and 6th grade girls Aug. 1-5. Campers were exposed to a variety of careers in science and learned how to use scientific tools like lab notebooks, pipets, and microscopes.

Four female Wesleyan faculty—Ishita Mukerji, the Fisk Professor of Natural Science, professor of molecular biology and biochemistry; Candice Etson, assistant professor of physics; Erika Taylor, associate professor of chemistry, associate professor of environmental studies; and Michelle Personick, assistant professor of chemistry—led a series of hands-on experiments with the campers. Sara MacSorley, director of the GSTLC, coordinated the activities.

Mukerji taught the campers about DNA by extracting DNA from strawberries. Students also built a large DNA model and created a secret message using DNA code.

Etson taught the campers about light, color, energy, light refraction, lenses and prisms, and electronics. The girls built their own electric motors, studied solar power, and learned the difference between incandescent and LED light bulbs.

Taylor and graduate student Mackenzie Schlosser taught the campers about parts of a cell, germs, and good and bad bacteria, and had campers test various areas of the Green Street Teaching & Learning Center for bacteria.

Personick taught viscosity by racing different fluids, such as chocolate sauce, corn oil, ketchup, soap, and glue, to see which flows best. The campers also learned about the different phases of matter.

“The girls were very surprised to see that ketchup flows slower than glue, and we talked about non-Newtonian fluids to explain that observation,” Personick said.

Personick also had the campers make bouncy balls by cross-linking a polymer (glue) with Borax; tested the properties (magnetism, conductivity, density, flexibility) of different metals to learn about what properties metals have in common and which properties depend on the shape/size of the piece of metal; and created silver nanoparticles in a rainbow of colors and then used silver and gold nanoparticles to make stained glass. On Aug. 5, the campers used what they learned about viscosity to make bubbles.

Students also made and ate liquid nitrogen ice cream to study phase changes in cooking, and talked about how cooking is science in the kitchen.

The Girls in Science Camp is supported by the Petit Family Foundation.

Photos of the Girls in Science Camp are below:

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Undergraduates Present Posters at Summer Research Presentation

More than 100 undergraduate research fellows presented their work at the Wesleyan Summer Research Poster Session July 28 in Exley Science Center and the Science Library.

More than 140 undergraduate research fellows presented their work at the Wesleyan Summer Research Poster Session July 28 in Exley Science Center and the Science Library.

Tristan Ang Tze Heng speaks about his study titled “Quantifying the Heterogeneous Dynamics a DPPC and Cholesterol Bilayer. Ang’s advisor is Francis Starr, professor of physics, professor of molecular biology and biochemistry, director of the College of Integrative Sciences.

Tristan Ang Tze Heng speaks about his study titled “Quantifying the Heterogeneous Dynamics of a DPPC and Cholesterol Bilayer. Ang’s advisor is Francis Starr, professor of physics, professor of molecular biology and biochemistry, director of the College of Integrative Sciences.

GLS Students Take Intensive Summer Courses

Wesleyan’s Graduate Liberal Studies is offering 13 courses this summer in narrative fiction and film, biography writing, European history, world literature, multivariable mathematics, the photographic book, abnormal psychology and more. Wesleyan offers a Master of Arts in Liberal Studies (MALS) and the more advanced Master of Philosophy in Liberal Arts (MPhil), as well as a Graduate Certificate in Writing and non-degree graduate study. Rather than becoming specialists in narrow fields, GLS graduates possess the highly-valued ability to connect across disciplines, identify multiple possibilities, and argue all sides of a topic.

Indira Karamcheti, associate professor of English, associate professor of American studies, is teaching HUMS 633: World Literature for Graduate Liberal Studies on Monday and Wednesdays.

Indira Karamcheti, associate professor of English, associate professor of American studies, is teaching HUMS 633: World Literature for Graduate Liberal Studies on Monday and Wednesdays.

Karamcheti’s class examines literature from the last half of the 20th century including works by authors from India, Africa, South America, and the Caribbean.

Karamcheti’s class examines literature from the last half of the 20th century including works by authors from India, Africa, South America, and the Caribbean.

Students learn how the authors shape their world and what issues concern them. Students learn how the authors shape their world and what issues concern them.

Students learn how the authors shape their world and what issues concern them.

Graduate Liberal Studies at Wesleyan University, 2016.

Anne Greene, the University Professor of English, (pictured at left) is teaching HUMS 606: Place, Character and Design. The class meets June 27-July 29 for three hours on Monday and Wednesday.

Place, Character and Design offers a rich and varied reading list and a chance to write and experiment, with careful editing of one's work.

Place, Character and Design offers a rich and varied reading list and a chance to write and experiment, with careful editing of one’s work.

The assignments are flexible and will suit each student's interests. Students may writing a novel, journalism, a memoir, or a grant proposal,The assignments are flexible and will suit each student's interests. Students may writing a novel, journalism, a memoir, or a grant proposal,

The assignments are flexible and suit each student’s interests. Students may write a novel, journalism article, a memoir, or a grant proposal.

Students read each other's work and offer feedback in class. Students learn how to establish a narrator's voice or characters' presence, develop style and design, and connect with readers.

Students read each other’s work and offer feedback in class. Students learn how to establish a narrator’s voice or characters’ presence, develop style and design, and connect with readers. (Photos by Olivia Drake)

Giulio Gallarotti, professor of government, professor of environmental studies and co-chair of the College of Social Studies, is teaching SOCS 630: The Evolution of Government: The Rise of the Modern Nation State on Tuesday and Thursday evenings.

Giulio Gallarotti, professor of government, professor of environmental studies and co-chair of the College of Social Studies, is teaching SOCS 630: The Evolution of Government: The Rise of the Modern Nation State on Tuesday and Thursday evenings this July.

This course takes the most historically complete view of the evolution of governance, from the very earliest forms of governance among humans in hunter-gatherer societies up to the most recent forms of governance in the present. Our study of the evolution of governance focuses on patterns in the transition from one form of governance to the next.

This course takes the most historically complete view of the evolution of governance, from the very earliest forms of governance among humans in hunter-gatherer societies up to the most recent forms of governance in the present. The class studies the evolution of governance and focuses on patterns in the transition from one form of governance to the next. (Photos by Ben Travers)

Campaign Celebrated at Grand Central in NYC

More than 200 members of the Wesleyan community—decked out in red and black—gathered in Vanderbilt Hall at Grand Central Terminal in New York City on June 16 to celebrate the success of the THIS IS WHY campaign, which draws to its end on June 30, 2016. The event was hosted by THIS IS WHY campaign chair John Usdan ’80, P’15, P’18, P’18.

At the event, President Michael Roth ’78 acknowledged some of the campaign leaders—including Usdan; Joshua Boger ’73, P’06, ’09, retiring chair of the Wesleyan Board of Trustees; Ellen Jewett ’81 P’17, trustee emerita; Alan Dachs ’70, P’98, Hon ’07, chair emeritus of the Board; and Donna Morea ’76, P’06, chair-elect of the Board—and thanked the entire Wesleyan community for its support.

“Thank you all for being generous donors to and supporters of this campaign,” said Roth, addressing the crowd. “We have faculty here who have mentored for decades, coaches who have helped athletes thrive, and parents whose kids have discovered what they love to do at Wesleyan. We are a family of people who support one another—not just for the sake of alma mater but also to send people out into the world to do great things.”

Photos of the event are below and the full gallery is in this Wesleyan Flickr album. (Photos by Robert Adam Mayer)

Wesleyan University and Campaign Chair John Usdan ’80 P’15, P’18, P’18, hosted a THIS IS WHY Campaign Celebration at Grand Central Station, New York, N.Y. on June 16, 2016. (Photo by Robert Adam Mayer)

THIS IS WHY campaign chair John Usdan ’80 P’15, P’18, P’18 hosted a campaign celebration at Grand Central Terminal, New York, N.Y., on June 16, 2016.

Wesleyan University and Campaign Chair John Usdan ’80 P’15, P’18, P’18, hosted a THIS IS WHY Campaign Celebration at Grand Central Station, New York, N.Y. on June 16, 2016. (Photo by Robert Adam Mayer)

Pictured, from left: John Usdan ’80 P’15, P’18, P’18; Wesleyan President Michael Roth ’78; and Joshua Boger ’73, P’06, ’09.

Wesleyan University and Campaign Chair John Usdan ’80 P’15, P’18, P’18, hosted a THIS IS WHY Campaign Celebration at Grand Central Station, New York, N.Y. on June 16, 2016. (Photo by Robert Adam Mayer)

From left: Wesleyan trustee David Resnick ’81, P’13, with Helen Haje P’13 and Peter Haje P’13.

Wesleyan University and Campaign Chair John Usdan ’80 P’15, P’18, P’18, hosted a THIS IS WHY Campaign Celebration at Grand Central Station, New York, N.Y. on June 16, 2016. (Photo by Robert Adam Mayer)

Pictured, from left: Connie McCann ’76, trustee emerita; Alan Dachs ’70, P’98, Hon ’07, chair emeritus of the Wesleyan Board of Trustees; and Karl Scheibe, professor of psychology, emeritus.

From left: Barbara-Jan Wilson, vice president for university relations; John Usdan ’80, P’15, P’18, P’18; and Eva Usdan P'15, P'18, P'18.

From left: Barbara-Jan Wilson, vice president for university relations; John Usdan ’80, P’15, P’18, P’18; and Eva Usdan P’15, P’18, P’18.

Wesleyan University and Campaign Chair John Usdan ’80 P’15, P’18, P’18, hosted a THIS IS WHY Campaign Celebration at Grand Central Station, New York, N.Y. on June 16, 2016. (Photo by Robert Adam Mayer)

From left: Cristhian Escobar ’00, Miguel Guadalupe ’98 and Jamie Novogrod ’02.

Wesleyan University and Campaign Chair John Usdan ’80 P’15, P’18, P’18, hosted a THIS IS WHY Campaign Celebration at Grand Central Station, New York, N.Y. on June 16, 2016. (Photo by Robert Adam Mayer)

Amy Appleton ’83 P’16, ’19 sports her homemade Wesleyan University dress.

Poetry, Fiction, Memoir Writing Taught at 60th Annual Writers Conference

The Wesleyan Writers Conference celebrated its 60th year with discussions on poetry, fiction and non fiction writing, the short story, novel, publishing, The conference, held June 15-19, allowed anyone interested in the writer’s craft to hone their skills.

The Wesleyan Writers Conference celebrated its 60th year with discussions on poetry, fiction and non fiction writing, the short story, novel and publishing. The conference, held June 16-19, welcomes new writers, established writers, and everyone interested in the writer’s craft.

Anne Greene, director of the Wesleyan Writers Conference, welcomed the participants to the conference on June 16.

Anne Greene, director of the Wesleyan Writers Conference, welcomed the participants to the conference on June 16.

The program includes seminars, craft sessions, workshops, master classes, guest speakers, readings, panel discussions, and manuscript consultations.

The program included seminars, craft sessions, workshops, master classes, guest speakers, readings, panel discussions and manuscript consultations.

Amy Bloom, the Distinguished University Writer-in-Residence at Wesleyan, made remarks at the Writing Conference. Bloom is the author of three novels, three collections of short stories, a children's book, and an essay collection. She has been a nominee for both the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award.

Amy Bloom, the Distinguished University Writer-in-Residence at Wesleyan, made remarks at the Writing Conference. Bloom is the author of three novels, three collections of short stories, a children’s book, and an essay collection. She has been a nominee for both the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award.

Guest faculty member Salvatore Scibona spoke about novel and short story writing. His short stories have been published in Threepenny Review, Best New American Voices 2004, The Pushcart Book of Short Stories: The Best Stories from a Quarter-Century of the Pushcart Prize, A Public Space, D di la Repubblica, Satisfaction, the New York Times, and The New Yorker.

Guest faculty member Salvatore Scibona spoke about novel and short story writing. His short stories have been published in Threepenny Review, Best New American Voices 2004, The Pushcart Book of Short Stories: The Best Stories from a Quarter-Century of the Pushcart Prize, A Public Space, D di la Repubblica, Satisfaction, The New York Times and The New Yorker.

Guest faculty member Lis Harris, a journalist and author, spoke about literary journalism and memoir. Harris was a staff worker on The New Yorker for 25 years, and her work has appeared in The New York Times, The World Policy Journal, and the Wilson Quarterly.

Guest faculty member Lis Harris, a journalist and author, spoke about literary journalism and memoir. Harris was a staff worker on The New Yorker for 25 years, and her work has appeared in The New York Times, The World Policy Journal, and the Wilson Quarterly.

Participants are welcome to ask questions throughout the Writers Conference.

Participants are welcome to ask questions throughout the Writers Conference.

Guest faculty member and poet Honor Moore is the author of three poetry collections: Red Shoes, Darling, and Memoir and two memoirs: The White Blackbird: A Life of the Painter Margaret Sargent by Her Granddaughter and The Bishop's Daughter, named an Editor's Choice by The New York Times, a "Favorite Book of 2008" by the Los Angeles Times, and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award.

Guest faculty member and poet Honor Moore is the author of three poetry collections: Red Shoes, Darling, and Memoir and two memoirs: The White Blackbird: A Life of the Painter Margaret Sargent by Her Granddaughter and The Bishop’s Daughter, named an Editor’s Choice by The New York Times, a “Favorite Book of 2008” by the Los Angeles Times, and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award.

On June 18, William Finnegan spoke to conference participants about writing about social and political issues. Finnegan’s new book Barbarian Days: A Surfing Life won the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography.

On June 18, William Finnegan spoke to conference participants about writing about social and political issues. Finnegan’s new book Barbarian Days: A Surfing Life won the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography.

Finnegan has been a contributor to The New Yorker since 1984 and a staff writer since 1987. Reporting from Africa, Central America, South America, Europe, the Balkans, and Australia, as well as from the United States, he has twice received the John Bartlow MArtin Award for Public Interest Magazine Journalism and twice been a National Magazine Award finalist.

Finnegan has been a contributor to The New Yorker since 1984 and a staff writer since 1987. Reporting from Africa, Central America, South America, Europe, the Balkans, and Australia, as well as from the United States, he has twice received the John Bartlow MArtin Award for Public Interest Magazine Journalism and twice been a National Magazine Award finalist.

Finnegan spoke to Wesleyan Writers Conference participants and signed copies of his book.

Finnegan spoke to Wesleyan Writers Conference participants and signed copies of his book.

Additional photos of the Wesleyan Writers Conference are below: (Photos by Olivia Drake and Tom Dzimian)

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Wesleyan’s Campus Boasts Natural Landscapes, Meadows, Wildflowers

Wesleyan’s campus is home to 89 acres of natural areas. These meadow areas are only mowed once a year and are home to wildflowers, native grasses and provide food and homes for wildlife. As part of the Wesleyan Sustainability Grounds Initiatives, the university is in the process of expanding no-mow areas across campus.

Hundreds of lupines grow in a meadow near Physical Plant on Long Lane. Hundreds of lupines grow in a meadow near Physical Plant on Long Lane.

Hundreds of lupines grow in a meadow near Physical Plant on Long Lane.

Land behind Wesleyan University Press on Long Lane is left natural.

Land behind Wesleyan University Press on Long Lane is left natural.

The student organization WILD Wes (Working for Intelligent Landscape Design at Wesleyan), created WILD WestCo, a .75 acre sustainable landscaping initiative in the West College Courtyard. WILD Wes developed a landscape design and implementation plan following a permacultural ethic.

The student organization WILD Wes (Working for Intelligent Landscape Design at Wesleyan), created WILD WestCo, a .75 acre sustainable landscaping initiative in the West College Courtyard. WILD Wes developed a landscape design and implementation plan following a permacultural ethic.

The West College courtyard is home to more than 40 shrubs, dozens of fruit trees, two rain gardens, a rainwater catchment system, multiple wood chip pathways lined in rye, clover and buckwheat, a seating area, compost area and hundreds of perennials that draw birds, insects and other wildlife.

The West College courtyard is home to more than 40 shrubs, dozens of fruit trees, two rain gardens, a rainwater catchment system, multiple wood chip pathways lined in rye, clover and buckwheat, a seating area, compost area and hundreds of perennials that draw birds, insects and other wildlife.

Wesleyan's cross country trails pass through a wooded area and this grassy field.

Wesleyan’s cross country trails pass through a wooded area and this grassy field rich with clover.

Buttercups bloom in a natural area between Physical Plant and the Freeman Athletic Center.

Buttercups bloom in a natural area between Physical Plant and the Freeman Athletic Center. (Photos by Olivia Drake)

Classes in Drawing, Biology, Programming, Writing Currently Offered during Wesleyan’s Summer Session

During Wesleyan’s Summer Session, students complete semester-long courses in only five weeks.

This summer, classes are being offered in drawing, biology, chemistry, computer programming, legal thinking, writing creative nonfiction, foreign policy, the art of the personal essay, the narrative, techniques of fiction, and international politics. All courses have limited enrollment, preserving the small seminar style and opportunity for close relationships with faculty and fellow students.

Summer Session I runs May 25 to June 23, and Session II takes place June 28 to July 28.

Pictured below is ARST131, Drawing I, taught by Kate TenEyck, assistant professor of art:

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Faculty, Staff Celebrate End of the Semester at Ice Cream Social

On June 1, the Office of Human Resources hosted an Ice Cream Social for faculty, staff and employed students on Andrus Field and the Huss Courtyard.

On June 1, the Office of Human Resources hosted an Ice Cream Social for faculty, staff and employed students on Andrus Field and the Huss Courtyard. The gathering provided an opportunity for employees to mingle and celebrate the end of spring semester.

Rhonda York, administrative assistant in the Art and Art History Department, adds an array of toppings to her ice cream.

Rhonda York, administrative assistant in the Art and Art History Department, adds an array of toppings to her ice cream.

Chris Cruz, manager of fire safety and facilities, enjoys the social with her son, Colin.

Chris Cruz, manager of fire safety and facilities, enjoys the social with her son, Colin.

Mario Torres, material handler in Physical Plant, served as the gathering's DJ.

Mario Torres, material handler in Physical Plant, served as the gathering’s DJ.

After enjoying ice cream, several faculty and staff played volleyball, steel drums, participated in a water balloon and bean bag toss and created tie-dye T-shirts. (Photos by Olivia Drake)

After enjoying ice cream, several faculty and staff played volleyball, steel drums, participated in a water balloon and bean bag toss and created tie-dye T-shirts.