Tag Archive for arts

Mellon Foundation Supports Curatorial Institute, Certificate Program at CFA

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded Wesleyan’s Center for the Arts (CFA) $750,000 to support the development of artists’ new work, interdisciplinary collaborations, co-teaching initiatives and arts-based campus-wide projects as well as the planning and partial funding of the Institute for Curatorial Practice in Performance (ICPP), a new post-graduate professional certificate program for performing arts presenters.

Pamela Tatge (Photo by Bill Burkhart)

“The CFA’s goal is to elevate the place of art, artists and the artistic process at Wesleyan in ways that innovatively strengthen teaching, student learning and art-making,” says Pamela Tatge, director of the Center for the Arts. “The Mellon-funded projects will help to achieve these goals by supporting the creative practice of diverse artists; sponsoring cross-disciplinary exchange and new course development; engaging students in a wide variety of opportunities to make, experience and understand art; and launching the ICPP to enhance professional practice in the presenting field.”

Tatge anticipates that by the end of the grant’s four-year period, powerful new connections will exist between numerous faculty in different departments and between faculty and visiting artists, “so that the arts are more organically integrated into non-arts areas at Wesleyan.”

Institute for Curatorial Practice in Performance
The Institute for Curatorial Practice in Performance (ICPP) brings artists, presenters, academics, and other performing arts professionals together

Book Artist, Publisher Robin Price Embraces Chance in Talk, Exhibit

Book artist, fine press printer and publisher Robin Price spoke on "Chance and the Artist's Book (Thank You, John Cage)" March 25 in the Center for the Arts Hall. Her lecture was followed by an opening reception at the Davison Art Center.

Book artist, fine press printer and publisher Robin Price spoke on "Chance and the Artist's Book (Thank You, John Cage)" March 25 in the Center for the Arts Hall. Her lecture was followed by an opening reception at the Davison Art Center. Price is known for taking artistic risks within the context of the traditional format of the book. Her work embraces chance, serendipity, and randomness, and she thrives on collaboration with a wide range of artists.

Ravenal ’81 President of Art Museum Association

John Ravenal '81

John Ravenal '81

John Ravenal ’81 is now president of his professional organization: the Association of Art Museum Curators (AAMC).

The Sydney and France Lewis Family Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond, Ravenal has become the fourth president of AAMC since the organization was founded in 2001.

Ravenal joined the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (VMFA) in 1998, and his exhibitions have included Vanitas: Meditations on Life and Death in Contemporary Art; Outer & Inner Space, a history of video art; and Artificial Light, displayed at VCUarts Anderson Gallery and the Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami.

In addition, he has recently completed a book on modern and contemporary art at VMFA and is planning a complete redesign of all modern and contemporary galleries, as well as the addition of a sculpture garden, to open this May.

An art history major at Wesleyan, Ravenal earned his M.A. and M.Phil in art history from Columbia University. Prior to his affiliation with the VMFA, Ravenal worked at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, where he was associate curator of 20th-century art.

“Our profession is now more important than ever as we maintain the artistic vision of the museums we serve and engage ever broadening audiences,” he says in an AAMC press release.

To learn more about the Association of Art Museum Curators, see http://www.artcurators.org.

Art by Schorr, Shinohara at New York Gallery

Artwork by David Schorr.

Artwork by David Schorr.

David Schorr, professor of art, and Keiji Shinohara, artist-in-residence of art and East Asian studies, are showing their artwork at the DFN Gallery, 64 East 79th Street in New York, N.Y.

Their work is featured in an exhibit titled “Looks Good on Paper,” which runs through March 6.

Schorr has been a faculty member at Wesleyan since 1971 where he has taught printmaking, drawing, typography, book design, graphic design and calligraphy. Fifteen years ago he turned to canvas for a series of paintings about AIDS and early death so he could layer the backgrounds, dissolving the figures in the ether of space to suggest loss and memory.

He is represented by Mary Ryan Gallery in New York City where he shows regularly. In addition has had solo shows in Chicago, Milan, Rome, Naples, Paris, Athens, Toronto, Montreal and Copenhagen. His work has been reproduced extensively in the New York Times, The New Yorker and most significantly The New Republic, for which he has done more than 300 portraits.

His work is in the collections of the National Gallery of Art, The Museum of Fine Arts (Boston), The Cleveland Museum of Art, The Fogg Museum (Harvard), The New York Public Library, The Israel Museum (Jerusalem), and the Museum of Modern Art, among others.

Artwork by Keiji Shinohara.

Artwork by Keiji Shinohara.

Shinohara began studying traditional Ukiyo-e techniques at Uesugi Studio, Kyoto, Japan in 1975, and in 1981, he became a Master Printmaker of woodblock printing. He’s had solo shows at the Art Zone, Kaguaoka Gallery in Kyoto, Japan in 2008,  the Tremaine Gallery at the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Conn. and Wesleyan’s Davison Art Center in 2008.

Shinohara’s natural abstractions are printed on rice paper with water-based inks from woodblocks in the Ukiyo-e style – the traditional Japanese printmaking method dating to 600 CE. Keiji Shinohara has been a visiting artist at over 100 venues.

He has received grants from the Japan Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts and his work is in many public collections, including the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, the Cleveland Museum of Art, the Milwaukee Art Museum, the Fogg Art Museum at Harvard University, and the Library of Congress.

Telfair’s Oil Paintings to be on Display at Local Museum

Painting by Tula Telfair, professor of art.

Painting by Tula Telfair, professor of art.

Oil paintings by Tula Telfair, professor of art, will be on display at the Florence Griswold Museum April 24 through June 27. Telfair’s exhibit is titled “Landscapes in Counterpoint.” The Griswold Museum is located at 96 Lyme Street in Old Lyme, Conn.

The exhibition pairs nine new monumental paintings by the artist with her selection of 19th and early 20th-century paintings from the museum’s collection. Telfair’s choices, which include works by Thomas Cole and Frederic E. Church, establish the visual foundation for, as well as a counterpoint to, her own large-scale landscapes-paintings that are informed by both tradition and imagination.

“We’re thrilled that the artist is creating new work for this exhibition that is contemporary and yet also in dialogue with the long history of landscape painting,” says Amy Kurtz Lansing, curator of the Florence Griswold Museum.

Telfair’s poetic landscapes, some over 9 by 6 feet,

Exhibit Portrays Tension Between Material Body, Academic Work

"Student Bodies," an exhibit organized by the Center for Creative Research Student Task Force Group, interrogates how students are present on campus, both during their four years at Wesleyan and after they graduate. The student dancers portray a physical body and the body of work students produce while writing and reading for classes.  The case inside the Usdan University Center is filled with old academic papers to explore the tension between each student's material body and the one they create through academic work. While moving, the students are thinking about how the physical body is included or left out of texts or readings, and how their physical bodies relate to the bodies that are written in texts.

"Student Bodies," an exhibit organized by the Center for Creative Research Student Task Force Group, interrogates how students are present on campus, both during their four years at Wesleyan and after they graduate. The student dancers portray a physical body and the body of work students produce while writing and reading for classes. The case inside the Usdan University Center is filled with old academic papers to explore the tension between each student's material body and the one they create through academic work. While moving, the students are thinking about how the physical body is included or left out of texts or readings, and how their physical bodies relate to the bodies that are written in texts. Pictured is Asa Horvitz '10.

The Center for Creative Research is a nationwide initiative that puts movement based artists in long-term residency situations on college campuses to explore how movement and scholarship can inform one another. The project was spearheaded by CCR intern Mark McCloughan '10; Eiko Otake, a CCR fellow and visiting artist; and Liz Lerman, head of the Liz Lerman Dance Exchange.

The Center for Creative Research is a nationwide initiative that puts movement based artists in long-term residency situations on college campuses to explore how movement and scholarship can inform one another. The project was spearheaded by CCR intern Mark McCloughan '10 (pictured); Eiko Otake, a CCR fellow and visiting artist; and Liz Lerman, head of the Liz Lerman Dance Exchange.

(Photos by Cora Lautze ’11)

Black Like Me No. 2 by Glenn Ligon ’82 on Display at the White House

In early October, the White House press office announced that the President Obama and his family had chosen 45 art works borrowed from several Washington museums to decorate various White House walls, including the text painting Black Like Me No. 2 by Glenn Ligon ’82, which is on loan from the Hirshhorn Musuem.

In an article in the Washington Post about the Obamas’ selection of art works, Blake Gopnik described Ligon as “one of the best one of the best African American artists working today, and also one of the smartest and toughest. His loaner work is a tall white canvas covered from top to bottom with the repeated phrase ‘All traces of the Griffin I had been were wiped from existence,’ a quote from the 1961 book the picture’s named after, Black Like Me, in which the white journalist John Howard Griffin made himself look black and reported on the troubles that befell him. Just as Griffin disappeared into blackness, and into the obliterations of American racism, so Ligon’s stenciled text disappears into an ever thicker mess of black pigment as it descends the canvas, until at the bottom it’s close to illegible.”

The Obamas’ choices include mostly modern contemporary paintings and sculptures by well-known artists such as Jasper Johns, Mark Rothko, and Edward Ruscha in addition to pieces by lesser-known artists such as Edward Corbett, who worked in Washington in the 1960s, and Alma Thomas, a 1960s-1970s African American abstract painter. Works by other African Americans and Native Americans are also on view as well as bronze dancers by Edgar Degas and still life paintings from the 1950s by Italian artist Giorgio Morandi.

Kress Awards Aksamija for Studies on Sala Bologna

Nadja Aksamija, assistant professor of art history, received a grant for $13,500 from the Kress Foundation for her research on “Sala Bologna at the Vatican.” Her grant, which was awarded May 1, spans for one and a half years.

McCullough ’10 Designs Socio-urban Plan for the Bronx’s Grand Concourse

As part of the Grand Concourse Beyond 100 urban planning project, Angus McCullough '10 designed the MTA "Skyway." By using cameras and projectors, the Skyway renders the sidewalk transparent, enabling passengers to see the sky from the platform below or an approaching train from above.

As part of the Grand Concourse Beyond 100 urban planning project, Angus McCullough '10 designed the MTA "Skyway." By using cameras and projectors, the Skyway renders the sidewalk transparent, enabling passengers to see the sky from the platform below or an approaching train from above.

Brooklyn, N.Y. native Angus McCullough ’10 envisions the thriving community living on Bronx’s Grand Concourse connected with a web of speakers, microphones, projectors and cameras.

As one of seven finalists, who placed third out of 400 entrants,  in the Intersections: Grand Concourse Beyond 100 urban planning project, McCullough designed an audio-visual nervous system for the Grand Concourse, using nodes to weave the long, thin boulevard into a tight-knit web of interaction. His project, titled “Live Wired,” landed him a $1,000 cash stipend to further develop his proposal for inclusion in the exhibition Intersections: Grand Concourse at 100 — Future at The Bronx Museum of the Arts,, which opened Nov. 1, 2009.

“The residents of the concourse are the focus of my design, and provide the content for this virtual infrastructure,” McCullough explains. “They share information with each other and govern when and how to use this nervous system, which is there for the sole purpose of connecting them to one another. My hope is that the residents use these systems to systems to reach out to each other, cultivating chance interactions between individuals who might otherwise never meet.”

Designed as a wide, tree-lined thoroughfare with carriage drives, bridle paths and sunken cross-streets, the Grand Concourse was conceived in 1870 by engineer Louis Risse as a means to connect Manhattan to the parks of the Northern Bronx. Today, the Grand Concourse hosts the largest collection of Art Deco and Art Moderne style buildings in America.

The MTA m.i.c. would allow riders waiting at subway or bus stops to talk to each other, find out how crowded the bus or train will be, when it will arrive or to pass the time. (Graphics by Angus McCullough '10)

The MTA m.i.c. would allow riders waiting at subway or bus stops to talk to each other, find out how crowded the bus or train will be, when it will arrive or to pass the time. (Graphics by Angus McCullough '10)

McCullough’s plan involves the installation of interactive nodes to connect disparate spaces along the four-mile-long Concourse: The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) mutual intercom connections (m.i.c.), would allow riders waiting at subway or bus stops to talk to each other, find out how crowded the bus or train will be, when it will arrive or to pass the time. Similarly, the Bodega Broadcast Network, installed near delis and grocery stores, would turn the concourse into a giant speaker system.

“The broadcast network relies on the

Dowdey Participates in Panel Discussion on Buddhist Printing

Patrick Dowdey, curator at the Freeman Center for East Asian Studies, adjunct assistant professor of anthropology, and adjunct assistant professor of East Asian Studies, is a co-curator of Pearl of the Snowlands: Buddhist Printing at the Derge Parkhang, an exhibit of original prints from Tibetan Buddhists.

The exhibit will be held from Sept. 11 to Dec. 5 at The Center for Book and Paper Arts at Columbia College in Chicago.  The prints from the Derge Parkhang are still created from hand-carved woodblocks, as they have been for over 300 years.

Dowdey will participate in a Nov. 21 panel discussion about the prints he helped retrieve from the monastery.

For more information, visit the Derge Parkhang website.