Tag Archive for campus buildings

Allbritton Center Unveiled at Ribbon Cutting Ceremony

Wesleyan President Michael Roth '78, WHO, WHO, Elena Allbritton ’93 and Robert Allbritton ’92 take part in a Allbritton Center ribbon-cutting ceremony Oct. 2. The U.S. Green Building Council awarded the Allbritton Center renovation its highly-prized Gold LEED Certification. (Photo by Bill Burkhart)

Wesleyan President Michael Roth '78, Joe Allbritton P'92, Barby Allbritton P'92, Elena Allbritton ’93 and Robert Allbritton ’92 take part in a Allbritton Center ribbon-cutting ceremony Oct. 2. (Photo by Bill Burkhart)

With a ribbon-cutting ceremony Oct. 2, Wesleyan unveiled a facility that enables Wesleyan to focus resources, encourage curricular innovation, original research and scholarship, and foster greater public understanding and responsibility.

The new Allbritton Broadcast Center is located on the second floor.

The new Allbritton Broadcast Center is located on the second floor.

The Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life, which occupies the renovated Davenport Campus Center, will emphasize its academic engagement with the public sphere. The center continues Wesleyan’s commitment to preparing students for lives as active citizens and for leadership. It seeks to support Wesleyan’s tradition of the scholar-teacher by encouraging faculty research in a manner that directly benefits and enhances student learning.

The Center reflects changes that have transpired across the social scientific disciplines. These include the creation of new multidisciplinary ventures, the growing number of studies employing multiple methodologies,

Labyrinth Built in Honor of Joe and Kit Reed

The new Wesleyan installation, Labyrinth, was presented to Wesleyan to honor Kit and Joe Reed. Kit is an author and resident writer at Wesleyan and Joe is professor of English and American studies, emeritus.

The new Wesleyan installation, Labyrinth, was presented to Wesleyan to honor Kit and Joe Reed. Kit is an author and resident writer at Wesleyan and Joe is professor of English and American studies, emeritus.

“Every university should have a labyrinth, for it represents our desire to unravel the essential mysteries of human existence. It is a problem to be solved, a question to be answered, a paradox to be considered.  Each labyrinth has a center and, as a diagram of learning, its tangled patterns lead us to that hidden core.  Even as the pursuit of knowledge follows many diverging paths there is also a basic symmetry to these designs, a unified whole that pleases the eye and piques the mind.” – Stephen Alter ’77

This month, the Wesleyan community can leave the stress behind while taking a meditative walk around a newly constructed labyrinth.

Located between the Skull and Serpent building and the Davison Art Center Courtyard, the 30-foot-wide circular maze simply titled “Labyrinth”, is a result of six years of planning and alumni fundraising. Labyrinth was presented to Wesleyan to honor Kit and Joe Reed. Kit is an author and resident writer at Wesleyan and Joe is professor of English and American studies, emeritus, who taught film courses at Wesleyan from the mid 1960s until his retirement in 2004.

Labyrinth detail. (Photos by Bill Burkhart)

Labyrinth detail. (Photos by Bill Burkhart)

“Kit and Joe Reed represent the very best of Wesleyan’s labyrinthine traditions,” explains Stephen Alter ’77, who spearheaded the Reed project. “They have led us along paths that do not follow a straight or predictable route. They have challenged and provoked us with questions that digress from ordinary disciplines and discourse. They have surprised and inspired us with their humor, their eccentricities, and their love of literature, film and art. For all these reasons, we dedicate this labyrinth in their honor, so that future generations of Wesleyan students will trace these paths and discover the secrets that lie therein.”

Alter and Cheryl Sucher ’78, with help from University Relations, started raising funds from Wesleyan alumni who were taught by Kit or Joe Reed. They hoped to create a structure that would reflect the Reeds’ love of literature, film, “irrepressible imaginations, and above all, their subversive integrity.” With the Reeds’ input, the group

Students Begin Class Sept. 8

Zoe Beyer ’10 and Daniel Krantz ’11 prepare for their first day of classes on Sept. 8.

Zoe Beyer ’10 and Daniel Krantz ’11 prepare for their first day of classes outside Usdan University Center. About 2,700 undergraduates kicked-off the start of the 2009-10 academic year Sept. 8.

Students pass by the new Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life.

Students pass by the new Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life.

Wesleyan students walk to Fisk Hall for their first classes.

Wesleyan students walk to Fisk Hall for their first classes.

William Kreiger ’11 gets ready to tackle his first day of classes at the Davison Art Center.

William Kreiger ’11 gets ready to tackle his first day of classes at the Davison Art Center.

Wesleyan students stroll down College Row on their first day of school. (Photos by Stefan Weinberger '10)

Wesleyan students stroll down College Row on their first day of school. Wesleyan offers more than 900 courses and 47 major fields of study. (Photos by Stefan Weinberger)

Preservation Services Remodeled, Receives Extra 180 Square Feet

A former storage room in Olin Library is now part of the Preservation Services facility.

A former storage room in Olin Library is now part of the Preservation Services facility.

When one of Olin Library’s books becomes tattered or torn, Preservation Services helps restore the book, making it again available for circulation.

In April, the one-room shop located in Olin’s basement received its own facelift.

“We outgrew the space that we had,” explains Michaelle Biddle, head of preservation services. “Our carpet was saturated with dirt and mold, and we needed more space and better lighting.”

The renovation included removing a wall between Preservation Services and a storage room formerly used by Special Collections and Archives. The storage area was merged with the current preservation lab, adding an additional 180 square feet to the working area.

The lab received new paint, new lighting and a Scottish tile floor. The project was funded by the Adelphic Education Fund.

Biddle works in the lab with between five student preservation technicians. She will be hiring eight students for the 2009-10 academic year.

“We now have wonderful light, cleanliness and enough space to be organized,” Biddle says. “Our productivity is up by over 100 percent compared to last year because we can now work on several different projects simultaneously.”

Preservation Services, established in 1999, restores books that have torn binding or pages, mold, page staining, and defacing. The department helps maintain the library’s collections, to ensure their availability to users, and to make items available in different formats when the originals are no longer useful because of severe deterioration of paper or bindings.

Davenport to Re-Open with Public Life, Writing Centers

At left, Scott Martin, superintendent of PAC Group LLC in North Haven, Conn. discusses floor plans with Alan Rubacha, construction services consultant, inside the former Davenport Campus Center on March 16.The building is undergoing an interior remodeling project and will re-open as The Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life for the Fall 2009 semester.

At left, Scott Martin, superintendent of PAC Group LLC in North Haven, Conn. discusses floor plans with Alan Rubacha, construction services consultant, inside the former Davenport Campus Center on March 16.The building is undergoing an interior remodeling project and will re-open as The Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life for the Fall 2009 semester.

1873 Class Album Returns to Wesleyan

Valerie Gillispie, assistant university archivist at Wesleyan University, flips through the pages of a class photo album dated 1873. A gentleman from Newark, Del. found the album in a pile of books and donated it back to Wesleyan this month. (Photo by Olivia Bartlett)

Valerie Gillispie, assistant university archivist at Wesleyan University, flips through the pages of a class photo album dated 1873. A gentleman from Newark, Del. found the album in a pile of books and donated it back to Wesleyan this month. (Photo by Olivia Bartlett)

When John Chambless was rummaging through a pile of old books at his mother’s home in Newark, Del., one mammoth album with an ornate and intertwined “WU” stuck out. Curious, he opened it up and discovered an album containing more than 50 black and white hand-laid photos of students, staff and campus buildings dated 1873.

Intrigued by the mysterious book that lacked attribution, Chambless began a series of internet searches in attempt of finding the book’s origin.

Wesleyan’s Alsop House Named National Landmark

The historical Alsop House - now the Davison Art Center -

The historical Alsop House - now the Davison Art Center - was designated a national historic landmark.

The Davison Art Center/Richard Alsop IV House, located at 301 High Street in Middletown, was designated a national historic landmark in January. The site was recognized for its role in U.S. history.

The landmark was suggested by the National Park System’s advisory board and designated by Interior Secretary Dirk Kempthorne.

The historic Alsop House is a distinguished architectural monument of the pre-Civil War period. The lot was acquired in 1835 and the house was built between 1838-1840 by Richard Alsop IV, son of the poet and “Hartford wit,” Richard Alsop III. Originally built for Alsop’s widowed mother, Maria Pomeroy Alsop Dana, the house remained in the Alsop family (although not occupied by them for a number of years) until 1948. In that year, it was purchased by Wesleyan with funds given by Harriet and George W. Davison, class of 1892.