Tag Archive for CFA

Students Re-Create Rural Arkansas Portraits

Aaron Peisner '12 and Garth Taylor '12 pose in a photo during the opening reception for Mike Disfarmer: Photographs in the Zilkha Gallery Oct. 9. Hailing from the small mountain town of Heber Springs, Arkansas, the photographer known as Mike Disfarmer captured the lives and emotions of rural Arkansans in starkly intimate portraits.

Aaron Peisner '12 and Garth Taylor '12 pose in a photo during the opening reception for Mike Disfarmer: Photographs in the Zilkha Gallery Oct. 9. Hailing from the small mountain town of Heber Springs, Arkansas, the photographer known as Mike Disfarmer captured the lives and emotions of rural Arkansans in starkly intimate portraits.

Aaron Peisner '12 and Garth Taylor '12 pose as rural Arkansans living between 1939 and 1945 in this portrait.

Aaron Peisner '12 and Garth Taylor '12 pose as rural Arkansans living between 1939 and 1945 in this portrait.

Cordelia Blanchard '12, Lindsay Keys '11, and Daria Lombroso '11 mimic Disfarmer's portraits by reflecting the mood at the height of the Great Depression. Disfarmer's photographs show the dramatic shifts during the war years, as well as the transformations of postwar prosperity.

Cordelia Blanchard '12, Lindsay Keys '11, and Daria Lombroso '11 mimic Disfarmer's portraits by reflecting the mood at the height of the Great Depression. Disfarmer's photographs show the dramatic shifts during the war years, as well as the transformations of postwar prosperity.

Mary Lauran Hall '10 and Mark McCloughan '10 pose for their picture. All photos were e-mailed to students after the event. Accompanying photos taken by Disfarmer are included in the exhibit. The photographs in this exhibition were printed from the original glass plates, recovered in the 1970s from Disfarmer's studio.

Mary Lauran Hall '10 and Mark McCloughan '10 pose for their picture. All photos were e-mailed to students after the event. Accompanying photos taken by Disfarmer are included in the exhibit. The photographs in this exhibition were printed from the original glass plates, recovered in the 1970s from Disfarmer's studio.

Emergency Response Studio Inspired by Hurricane Katrina Disaster

Nina Felshin, curator of exhibitions at the Center for the Arts, and Camille Parente, financial analyst/gallery coordinator, examine the Emergency Response Studio installed on the Center for the Arts green. The studio was inspired by artist Paul Villinski's visit to New Orleans, La. in August 2006 after Hurricane Katrina.

Nina Felshin, curator of exhibitions at the Center for the Arts, and Camille Parente, financial analyst/gallery coordinator, examine the Emergency Response Studio installed on the Center for the Arts green. The studio was inspired by artist Paul Villinski's visit to New Orleans, La. in August 2006 after Hurricane Katrina.

Though designed as an artist's studio and residence, Emergency Response Studio is an ingenious prototype for self-sufficient, solar-powered mobile housing.

Though designed as an artist's studio and residence, Emergency Response Studio is an ingenious prototype for self-sufficient, solar-powered mobile housing.

Emergency Response Studio is a transformed 30-foot Gulfstream Cavalier trailer, virtually identical to the 50,000 trailers built for FEMA.  Working continuously from April to October 2008, Villinski transformed the trailer's formaldehyde-ridden materials with green technology and building materials, including recycled denim insulation, bamboo cabinetry, compact fluorescent lighting, reclaimed wood, and floor tiles made from linseed oil.

Emergency Response Studio is a transformed 30-foot Gulfstream Cavalier trailer, virtually identical to the 50,000 trailers built for FEMA. Working continuously from April to October 2008, Villinski transformed the trailer's formaldehyde-ridden materials with green technology and building materials, including recycled denim insulation, bamboo cabinetry, compact fluorescent lighting, reclaimed wood, and floor tiles made from linseed oil.

Alaskan Composer Speaks, Samples Music at CFA

Alaskan composer John Luther Adams presented a talk on his complex musical work, <i>The Place Where You Go to Listen</i>, Jan. 28 in the Center for the Arts Cinema. For the past 30 years, the vastness of Alaska has been instrumental in the composer's imagination and his compositions. Adams sampled his musical compositions during the talk.

Alaskan composer John Luther Adams presented a talk on his new book, The Place Where You Go to Listen, Jan. 28 in the Center for the Arts Cinema. For the past 30 years, the vastness of Alaska has been at the forefront of the composer's imagination and his compositions. Adams sampled his musical compositions during the talk.

Exhibit Examines Post-Soviet Russia through Photography, Video

Sasha Rudensky, <i>Bus Station</i>, Sevastopol, Ukraine, 2004, chromogenic print.

Sasha Rudensky's "Bus Station," Sevastopol, Ukraine, 2004, chromogenic print.

In her first major solo exhibition, visiting professor of art Sasha Rudensky ’01, will present two photographic series at Wesleyan University’s Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery: “Remains” (2004/08) and “Demons” (2007–08).

In “Remains,” Rudensky, who was born in Moscow in 1979 and moved to the United States in 1990, explores the political and social transformation of the former Soviet Union by poignantly focusing on the intimate details of everyday life. “Demons,” a series of hybrid portraits, suggests a fantastical version of the artist’s childhood.

Rudensky “Remains” in the fall of 2004 after receiving a Mortimer Hays Brandeis traveling fellowship. Her images, however, turned out to be very different than what she first intended to photograph.

“My proposal was to document mining towns in Siberia and the arctic north,” Rudensky says. “But having gotten there and after doing some preliminary shooting, I realized I didn’t want to simply document post-soviet devastation of depressed towns,

Photographers Speak on ‘Eye of History: The Camera as Witness’ Panel

The Camera as Witness" presentation and panel Nov. 7.

Documentary photographer Wendy Ewald explained how photography relates to personal history during the "Eye of History: The Camera as Witness" presentation and panel Nov. 7.

“We can never really claim to have seen anything unless it has been photographed.” — Émile Zola, c. 1901, Minutes of the Camera Club of Paris

Documentary photographers, contemporary visual artists and historians grapple with issues of photographic meaning, evidence, and interpretation.

This fall, Wesleyan has hosted a series of exhibitions, talks and films that explore photography’s role in historiography, historical memory and public life. Organized by Associate Professor of History Jennifer Tucker, “Eye of History: The Camera as Witness” serves as a meeting point for people who share a common interest in photography, art and historical memory.

On Nov. 7, internationally-renowned documentary photographers Wendy Ewald, Eric Gottesman and Susan Meiselas joined acclaimed writer and critic David Levi Strauss in a panel discussion about photography’s role in the world today.

10 Artists Featured in Documentary Photography Exhibit

Nina Felshin explains a recent exhibition of Eric Gottesman and Sudden Flowers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Curator Nina Felshin explains a recent exhibition of Eric Gottesman and Sudden Flowers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

By Intisar Abioto ’09

The current Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery exhibition Framing and Being Framed: The Uses of Documentary Photography, challenges the traditional space between the artist, the subject and the viewer.

The exhibition of two-dimensional photographs, photo installations, video and web-based works features art by Ann Messner, Perry Bard, Matthew Buckingham, Wendy Ewald, Susan Meiselas, An-My Lê, Emily Jacir, Alfredo Jaar, Eric Gottesman and Kota Ezawa.

Curator Nina Felshin planned this exhibition after meeting with Jennifer Tucker, chair and associate professor of feminist, gender and sexuality studies, associate professor of history, associate professor of science in society, several years ago. Tucker organized a university-wide, photography project, Eye of History: The Camera as Witness, a semester long series of exhibitions, films and talks exploring how photographs shape the ways in which people remember historical events.