Tag Archive for conference

Wesleyan Hosts Undocumented Students Conference

Wesleyan, along with Connecticut Students for a Dream, presented “Moving From Knowledge to Action: An Educators Conference on Undocumented Students” Nov. 4 in Beckham Hall.

Undocumented students in Connecticut and nationwide face a broad range of challenges, many of those specifically related to education. These issues directly stem from a student’s undocumented status as well as being disproportionately affected by other education equity issues.

Wesleyan staff joined high school teachers, counselors, parent liaisons, community organization staff, future educators, and others from around the state to discuss ways educational institutions can better support and advocate for undocumented students.

Attendees learned about the history and current climate surrounding undocumented students in education; discussed ways to make their school or campus a safe and welcoming space; and networked with fellow educators passionate about working with undocumented students to create change.

Photos of the conference are below:

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CEAS Hosts “Environment in East Asia” Student Conference

"Environment in East Asia" was the topic of the inaugural College of East Asian Studies Student Conference held March 25. The conference included an interdisciplinary panel of Wesleyan faculty discussing issues related to the environment in East Asia; break-out sessions conducted in four languages (Chinese, English, Japanese, Korean); and a wrap-up session to bring all conversations together.

“Environment in East Asia” was the topic of the inaugural College of East Asian Studies Student Conference held March 25. The conference included an interdisciplinary panel of Wesleyan faculty discussing issues related to the environment in East Asia; break-out sessions conducted in four languages (Chinese, English, Japanese, Korean); and a wrap-up session to bring all conversations together.

More than 60 students gathered in Beckham Hall for the College for East Asian Studies Student Conference, “Environment in Asia,” co-sponsored with the Center for Global Studies and the Center for Pedagogical Innovation on March 25.

Professor of Government Mary Alice Haddad, Associate Professor of Music Su Zheng, and Associate Professor of Film Studies Lisa Dombrowski offered their discipline as a lens through which to view environmental concerns in the region— from using political action to regulate pollution, to music videos that call attention to smog concerns, to films that highlight the surreal aspects of man-made structures that change the landscape.

Following the talks, students adjourned small discussion groups. The conference was unique in offering conversation in each of four languages, noted Haddad, who is also chair of the College for East Asian Studies and professor of East Asian studies and professor of environment studies.

“At Wesleyan, we have enough language competency for students to engage in meaningful, intellectually rigorous discussions in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean,” said Haddad. “We have enough diversity on campus that any given session will likely have no fewer that four nationalities represented.”

After the sessions, the students and professors then convened to bring their observations back to the group—and to plan similar events.

Haddad was pleased with the conference, calling it “an extraordinary event that highlighted everything that is so special about Wesleyan.” She said, “Students from around the globe interacted in multiple languages discussing one of the most important issues of our time. Faculty from different disciplines illuminated and discovered new insights as we discussed our work in the interdisciplinary panel.
She also noted that student identity groups were the primary organizers of the event, “generating the ideas and the energy underneath everything. It was one of those moments in which everything comes together.”

Haddad also places the event in context of growth: “The CEAS received two large institutional grants this year. One was from the Japan Foundation to hire a new tenure track faculty member in traditional Japanese literature. The other was from the Korea Foundation to hire a new tenure track faculty member in Korean political economy. Although neither of the grants had funds for student conferences, and thus were not direct funders of the events, some of the inspiration for the event came from our wish to celebrate the growth and vibrancy of our new College.”

See additional photos of the conference below: (Photos by Olivia Drake)

 Professor of Government Mary Alice Haddad spoke on "Environmental Politics in East Asia." Haddad also is chair and professor of East Asian studies and professor of environmental studies.


Professor of Government Mary Alice Haddad spoke on “Environmental Politics in East Asia.” Haddad also is chair and professor of East Asian studies and professor of environmental studies.

Wesleyan Hosting New England Intercollegiate Geological Conference Oct. 9-11

The 107th New England Intercollegiate Geological Conference will  be hosted by Wesleyan in Octobe

The 107th New England Intercollegiate Geological Conference will be hosted by Wesleyan in October. (Click to enlarge)

Wesleyan’s Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences is hosting the 107th New England Intercollegiate Geological Conference Oct. 9-11 on campus and in the field. Several Wesleyan faculty, students and alumni are participating in the conference, which includes trips to local sites of ancient and modern geological interest.

Participants will have the opportunity to examine tectonic slivers of oceanic terrain near New Haven; explore groundwater flow patterns and geologic deposits in Bloomfield; observe a gravel bed channel affected by a dam removal on the Naugatuck River in Waterbury; learn about the bedrock geology in Collinsville; examine common continental facies that comprise the Jurassic Portland Formation in the Hartford Basin at multiple locations; observe mineral forming geoenvironments near Trumbull; study a cranberry bog restoration in Massachusetts, and much more.

In addition, Wesleyan’s Johan Varekamp, the Harold T. Stearns Professor of Earth Science, and Ellen Thomas, University Professor in the College of Integrative Sciences, research professor of earth and environmental sciences, will lead a tour of coastal marshes

Wesleyan Celebrates 40 Years of Coeducation at Seminars Oct. 11-12

Wesleyan will celebrate the "Women of Wesleyan" at "Women in STEM Day" Oct. 11 and at "Campus Transformation Through Co-Education" Oct. 12. Pictured above are two female students in 1969.

Wesleyan will celebrate the women of Wesleyan at “Women in STEM Day” Oct. 11 and at “Campus Transformation Through Co-Education” Oct. 12. Pictured above are Josette Sayers ’71 of Simsbury, Conn. and Susan Strauss ’70 of Cleveland, Ohio. (Photo appeared in the The Courant Magazine, 1969)

It may be difficult for today’s sophomores (roughly 54 percent female and 46 percent male) to imagine a Wesleyan without women. Harder still to wrap their minds around the idea that coeducation is relatively young at the 182-year-old university. (A pre-modern coed experiment lasted from 1872 to 1912.)

In this June 1970 Middletown Press photo, six of the seven women who received degrees at the 1970 commencement, are pictured.

In this June 1970 Middletown Press photo, six of the seven women who received degrees at the 1970 commencement, are pictured.

Yet this year, Wes celebrates 40 years of women at Wesleyan, from the early female varsity athletes (some of whom competed on men’s squads until enough women could be found to join) to the influx of women who integrated the largely male professoriat (and now make up about 46 percent of the faculty).

“It was conveyed to me when I was hired that Wesleyan didn’t want to just add female students; it wanted to change the university culture,” said Sheila Tobias, the first female provost at Wesleyan who was hired in 1970 and charged with not just overseeing the inclusion of women students, but to help hire and promote female faculty.

Political Theorist Hannah Arendt Discussed at Recent Conference

On Sept. 26-28, Wesleyan hosted a conference titled “Exercising Judgment in Ethics, Politics, and the Law: Hannah Arendt’s 'Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil,' 50 Years Later." The event honored the 50th anniversary of political theorist Hannah Arendt's publication, 'Eichmann in Jerusalem,' a work she completed while she was a fellow at Wesleyan’s Center for Advanced Studies (now the Center for the Humanities).

On Sept. 26-28, Wesleyan hosted a conference titled “Exercising Judgment in Ethics, Politics, and the Law: Hannah Arendt’s ‘Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil,’ 50 Years Later.” The event honored the 50th anniversary of political theorist Hannah Arendt’s publication, ‘Eichmann in Jerusalem,’ a work she completed while she was a fellow at Wesleyan’s Center for Advanced Studies (now the Center for the Humanities).

Wesleyan to Host Gun Violence Prevention Conference Sept. 28

On Sept. 28, Wesleyan hopes to change the conversation, change the culture, and change future laws regarding gun violence in America.

During a day-long conference titled, “Marching On,” experts from Wesleyan and all over Connecticut will speak on gun violence prevention and ways to promote legislation change. The event is hosted by Connecticut Against Gun Violence, the Wesleyan Association of Christian Thinkers, Wesleyan’s Center for Community Partnerships and the Office of Religious and Spiritual Life, Delta Kappa Epsilon, Psi Upsilon, Womanist House, Buddhist house, 200 Church residence hall and Wes Democrats.

“The evidence of preventable, unnecessary gun violence in our society is unavoidable,” said conference co-organizer Claire Wright ’16. “Wesleyan has been blessed with an engaged, socially conscious student body that has shown continued interest in changing the current gun legislation in the U.S. The conference will provide Wesleyan guests an opportunity to learn about current concerns about gun violence, methods to effectively change legislation, and organizations that are working to reduce irresponsible gun use.”

Participants may attend sessions on “Past, Present and Future of Gun Violence Prevention in Connecticut,” “Guns 101: The Terminology and Technology,” The 2014 Elections: How YOU can Impact the Results,” “Beyond Mass Shootings: The Hidden Epidemic of Gun Homicide,” “Marching for Change: Building a Movement,” “Legislative Strategy: Making Your Voice Heard,” and “Maximum Impact: Effective Social Media Strategy.”

Marty Isaac, president of the CAGV Board of Directors, and Donald Moon, the Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Professor in the College of Social Studies, professor of government, will welcome the participants. Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy will deliver the keynote address.

Students admission is free of charge.

“In order for us to truly change the U.S. legislation, we need to work consistently and continuously towards this goal,” Wright said. “For students interested in politics and social change, I believe this conference will provide empowering, useful advice, information and resources, uniting Wesleyan students with CAGV.”

For a list of speakers, to see a full schedule, see this link. To register and pay on-line visit www.cagv.org.

Wesleyan Hosts Conference to Honor Theorist Hannah Arendt

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of former Wesleyan fellow Hannah Arendt's publication, Wesleyan is hosting an interdisciplinary conference with speakers from the U.S., Israel and Germany.

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of Hannah Arendt’s groundbreaking trial report on “the banality of evil,” Wesleyan is hosting an interdisciplinary conference featuring internationally acclaimed historians and political philosophers.

Fifty years ago, political theorist Hannah Arendt (1906-1975) published Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil, a work she completed while she was a Fellow at Wesleyan’s Center for Advanced Studies (now the Center for the Humanities). On Sept. 26-28, Wesleyan will host a conference to honor this achievement and reflect on the reverberating repercussions of Arendt’s work, a trial report that asks important and abiding questions about personal responsibility under dictatorship, the moral judgment of evil, the juridical prosecution of genocidal crimes of an international nature, and, more broadly, the historical conditions that shape our understanding of the Holocaust.

The conference, titled “Exercising Judgment in Ethics, Politics, and the Law: Hannah Arendt’s Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil, Fifty Years Later,” is organized by Sonali Chakravarti, assistant professor of government; Ethan Kleinberg, director of the Center for the Humanities; and Uli Plass, associate professor of German studies and Center for the Humanities faculty fellow.

Arendt’s book comments on the trial of SS-Lieutenant Colonel Adolf Eichmann, who was responsible for organizing the deportation of European Jews to Nazi death campus during World War II. At his trial, Eichmann was found guilty of 15 criminal charges in an Israeli court and was executed in 1962. In a lecture at Wesleyan in January 1962, Arendt explained that Eichmann had been found guilty of “crimes against humanity,” a new category of crime to be distinguished from war crimes: “[Eichmann’s] crime was international in nature. It has been called, properly, crime against humanity. Only if such a crime exists can there be international law, criminal law, and an international court which deals with individuals.”

Eichmann in Jerusalem continues to be one of the most famous and controversial works of political theory ever written,” Plass said. “The book immediately caused a controversy that has not fully subsided to this day; it also opened up a new chapter in the public awareness and understanding of genocide and played a crucial role in the emergence of the academic field of Holocaust studies.”

To acknowledge the intellectual range of Arendt’s book in particular and her political philosophy more broadly, this interdisciplinary conference will feature speakers from the U.S., Israel and Germany representing the fields of political theory, moral philosophy, intellectual history, law, Holocaust studies, feminist and gender studies, and literary theory.

Wesleyan Hosts 18th Century Scholars Conference

Wesleyan hosted the 2012 Northeast American Society for 18th Century Studies Conference Oct. 11-14 with a theme of “The Social Individual.”

Scholars from universities and colleges throughout the country presented papers and participated in panels. Topics included Haiti’s Circum-Atlantic Roots and Routes; The Image and Occupations of the Social Individual; Questions and Experience of Temporality in 18th-Century France; Translation and the Public Good; Rethinking the Early American “Social Individual;” Lunatics, Lice, Mad Doctors, and Assassins; Shakespeare and 18th Literary Criticism; The Social Animal: Humans and Nonhumans; British Narratives; Social Science and the Science of the Social; among many others.

Photos of the conference are below:

Social Justice Leadership Conference April 21

The SJLC conference provides a space for students, student groups, community members, alumni, faculty and staff to discuss social justice and to learn and refine leadership skills.

Education reform, conflict resolution and confronting racial segregation are among the topics to be discussed at the fourth annual Social Justice Leadership Conference (SJLC) on April 21.

SJLC is a collaborative effort which provides a space for students, student groups, community members, alumni, faculty, and staff to discuss social justice and to learn and refine leadership skills. SJLC seeks to empower its participants to create change by applying the skills and knowledge acquired during the conference.

Students, student groups, alumni, community members, faculty and staff facilitate sessions in their area of interest or expertise. Sessions focus on leadership skills that may be applied to any social movement and on the many manifestations of injustice and how participants can be involved in creating change. SJLC provides participants with resources and opportunities for engagement on campus, in Middletown, in Connecticut and across the globe.

The conference begins at 11 a.m. with a keynote address from Mark Masselli P ’15, P’16. Masselli was honored with a Doctorate of Humane Letters by Wesleyan in 2009 for his work in the health care field.  Along with a small group of Wesleyan students and community activists,  Masselli founded the Community Health Center in Middletown, Conn. as a Free Clinic in 1972 and worked with the National Free Clinic Council based in San Francisco in promoting the development of free clinics across America. He’s a founding member of many health and human services initiatives in Middletown, including New Horizons Battered Women’s Shelter, Nehemiah Housing Corporation and Oddfellows Youth Playhouse.

The following SJLC sessions and presenters are:

12:15 p.m. “Radical Accessibility” presented by Ariel Schwartz ’12 and Catherine MacLean ’14 from Wesleyan Students for Disability Rights; 12:15 p.m. “Teacher and Training Accountability,” presented by Andrew Ribner ’14; 12:15 p.m. “How to be a Good Trans* Ally,” presented by Nico Vitto ’12;

1:15 p.m. “Educational Markets, Testing and Accountability in Comparative Perspective,” presented by Catherine Doren ’13 and Daniel Long, assistant professor of sociology; 1:15 p.m. “WesDEF Presnets: Conflict Resolution within Activism,” presented by Mariana Eversley ’14 and Janika Oza ’15; 1:15 p.m. “Religious Impact on 2012 Election,” presented by Halbert Weidner and Erin Chase ’15;

2:15 p.m. “Connecticut Education Reform,” presented by Andrew Ribner ’14 and Patrick Riccards from CONNCAN; 2:15 p.m. “Failing Schools and Violent Neighborhoods: Intersecting Problems and Solutions,” presented by Alyssa Bonneau ’14 and Sam Mcallister ’14; 2:15 p.m. “Considering Opportunity – Confronting Racial Segregation in 2012,” presented by Erin Boggs ’93; 2:15 p.m. “Self-Care as a Radical Technique in Queer Community Organizing,” presented by Sarah Lamming ’13;

3 p.m. Reflection and wrap-up with Wesleyan staff members Elisa Del Valle and Gretchen Streiff.

The vent is sponsored by the Office of Student Activities and Leadership Development. To register, fill out this form online here. For more information send an email here.