Tag Archive for employee news

Staff on the Move, January-April 2017

The Office of Human Resources reports the following hires, transitions and departures from January through April:

Hires
Seirra Fowler, director of health education on Jan. 3.
Shelissa Newball, associate director of student activities and leadership development on Jan. 5.
Rhoanne Esteban, data analyst in university relations on Jan. 9.
Jacob Gonzalez, STEM Career Advisor in the Gordon Career Center on Jan. 9.
Andrew Harazim, athletic facility maintenance person on Jan. 9.
Katie Scheinberg, psychiatric nurse practitioner for CAPS on Feb. 6.
Tania Inturrisi, budget analyst in financial planning on Jan. 9.
Sarah Curran, director of the Center for the Arts on Feb. 20.
Megan Conte was hired as residential operations coordinator on March 27.
Sandy Durosier ’13 was hired as an area coordinator on April 3.
Melanie Messier was hired as manager of financial reporting on April 3.
Andres Sarda was hired as operations project coordinator for Physical Plant-Facilities on April 10.
Victoriano Diaz was hired as operations project coordinator for Physical Plant-Facilities on April 17.
Bonnie Solivan was hired as academic technologist on April 17.
Denise White-Patterson was hired as associate director of benefits on April 17.

Transitions
Melissa Rocha, manager of video services and lead video producer on Jan. 1.
Valerie Nye, director of financial services on Jan. 20.
Joseph Rich, user services manager on Feb. 16.
Jenna Starr, assistant director of alumni and parent relations on March 20.
Teshia Levy-Grant ‘00, dean for equity and inclusion on April 1.
Karen Hook, donor database implementation project manager on April 24.
Courtney Fullilove, associate professor of history, effective July 1.
Tushar Irani, associate professor of letters, associate professor of philosophy, effective July 1.
Marty Gilmore, director of graduate studies, effective July 1.
William Johnston, academic secretary, effective July 1.
Sean McCann, director of academic writing, effective July 1.
Peter Rutland, director of the Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life, effective July 1.

Departures
Pierina Cheung, research associate in psychology
Robert Jasek, chief information security officer
Ismet Jooma, assistant director of online communications for university relations
Eileen McNamara, residential operations coordinator
Laura Paul, interim director of the Center for the Arts
Allynn Wilkinson, video editor
Krystle Wilson, admissions coordinator for continuing studies
Stephanie Aviles, medical office assistant
Jeffrey McDonald, assistant to the director for operations and facilities
Patrice Melley, director of human resources
Jamil Ragland, assistant registrar

Ice Cream Social June 6

The Office of Human Resources will host an ice cream social for Wesleyan staff and faculty from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m., Tuesday June 6. 

 

Kolcio Leads Somatic Exercises for the Ukrainian National Guard

Professor of Dance and Environmental Studies Katja Kolcio leading a somatic workshop with Ukrainian National Guardsmen. What I’ve learned is most radical about being invited by the National Guard – The have instituted counseling and mind-body programming in an effort to mitigate the dehumanizing effects of war. There is a great concern about the long term effects that this invasion political conflict with Russia will have in Ukraine on the present and future generations.

The Ukranian National Guard invited Wesleyan Professor of Dance and Environmental Studies Katja Kolcio to their country to lead somatic workshops for Guard personnel. The request from a reserve military force, says Kolcio, was unprecedented, and it illustrates that country’s radically new understanding of conflict. “They have instituted counseling and mind-body programming in an effort to mitigate the dehumanizing effects of war,” Kolcio says. “There is a great concern about the longterm effects that this political conflict with Russia will have in Ukraine on the present and future generations.”

Wesleyan Professor of Dance and Environmental Studies Katja Kolcio traveled again to Ukraine in April, this time to work with soldiers and psychologists in the National Guard. It was her third trip to the region to teach somatic practices to those undergoing the stress of political conflict, displacement, and combat.

Somatics are “mind-body practices that combine physical activity and motion with deep reflection,” she explained in “Somatics and Political Change: Ukraine’s Revolution of Dignity,” (Contact Quarterly, summer/fall 2016), detailing her first trip to the region after Russia invaded Ukraine in 2014. In June 2015 she had been invited to lead somatic workshops for the volunteers working with refugee families and injured soldiers and offered her first set of classes in Ukraine then.

“One goal of somatics is to become more aware of subtle physical indications of dis-ease before they become acute or chronic issues,” she wrote. “Somatics is also a practice of “sense-making’—of integrating internal experiences with the external environment in order to become more conscious in the present moment.”

Kolcio considers this crucial work for her Wesleyan students, including first-year students “who are away from home for the first time, encountering world-shifting ideas.” Working with the breath and experiencing the body in the environment—its weight, the stress it holds—helps to orient the practitioner in the present moment—and envision new possibilities, make sense of the world in a different way.”

This work of integrating experiences is particularly important for those in regions undergoing crises, Kolcio believes—and it is what she can offer this country where she has familial roots. At the invitation of the National Guard of Ukraine this time, Kolcio returned to implement a somatics program to alleviate the injuries that soldiers sustain in combat.

Offering two-day workshops, Kolcio taught the creative and contemplative physical practices of somatics, as well as the cognitive approaches to build psychological flexibility and stress resistance among soldiers. Some of the techniques included the history of the body, self-awareness, breathing, body weight, muscle tension and movement.

“Various events leave a mark not only in memory but also in the body,” says Kolcio. “Thus, when helping patients recover from traumatic events, it is important to consider not only the memory in a classic sense, but the memory within the body.”

A political science major as an undergraduate, Kolcio places her body work in the context of that country’s history. The peaceful protest of the Revolution of Dignity has helped that country envision “another kind of orientation, one that seemed intent on superseding ethnic, national, and religious definitions,” she wrote in Contact Quarterly.

”What if we treated social-political orientation in the way we approach awareness in a somatic workshop?” she asks in her article. “I believe this is why my somatic workshops are being embraced here. People are seeking new ways of making sense in the world…. Somatics is an individual practice; I also see it as a social movement.” dlya_oficeriv-psyhologiv_provely_trening_za_uchasti_zakordonnyh_ekspertiv_2

 

Royer Finds Climate Could Soon Hit a State Unseen in 50 Million Years

Dana Royer

Dana Royer

New climate research by Dana Royer, professor and chair of earth and environmental sciences, finds that current carbon dioxide levels are unprecedented in human history and, if they continue on this trajectory “the atmosphere could reach a state unseen in 50 million years” by mid-century, according to an article in Salon.

The carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere today are ones that likely haven’t been reached in 3 million years. But if human activities keep committing carbon dioxide to the atmosphere at current rates, scientists will have to look a lot deeper into the past for a similar period. The closest analog to the mid-century atmosphere we’re creating would be a period roughly 50 million years ago known as the Eocene, a period when the world was completely different than the present due to extreme heat and oceans that covered a wide swath of currently dry land.

“The early Eocene was much warmer than today: global mean surface temperature was at least 10°C (18°F) warmer than today,” Dana Royer, a paleoclimate researcher at Wesleyan University who co-authored the new research, said. “There was little-to-no permanent ice. Palms and crocodiles inhabited the Canadian Arctic.”

Royer’s paper was published April 4 in Nature Communications and widely covered in the mainstream press. The implications, writes Salon, “are some of the starkest reminders yet that humanity faces a major choice to curtail carbon pollution or risk pushing the climate outside the bounds that have allowed civilization to thrive.”

According to an article in U.S. News & World Report:

 CO2 levels in the atmosphere have varied over millions of years. But fossil fuel use in the last 150 years has boosted levels from 280 parts per million (ppm) before industrialization to nearly 405 ppm in 2016, according to the researchers.

If people don’t halt rising CO2 levels and burn all available fossil fuels, CO2 levels could reach 2,000 ppm by the year 2250, the researchers said. CO2 and other gases act like a blanket, preventing heat from escaping into space. That’s known as the greenhouse effect, the researchers explained.

But the researchers note that CO2 levels are not the only factor in climate change; changes in the amount of incoming light also have an affect, and nuclear reactions in stars like the sun have made them brighter over time. Royer says this interplay is important:

“Up to now it’s been a puzzle as to why, despite the sun’s output having increased slowly over time, scant evidence exists for any similar long-term warming of the climate. Our finding of little change in the net climate forcing offers an explanation for why Earth’s climate has remained relatively stable, and within the bounds suitable for life all this time.”

Royer also is professor of environmental studies, professor of integrative sciences. See more coverage in Science Daily and International Business Times.

Tamhankar Honored with Cardinal Achievement Award

Anjali Tamhankar, associate director of human resources, received a Cardinal Achievement Award for her efforts in demonstrating extraordinary initiative in performing a specific task associated with her work at Wesleyan University.

This special honor comes with a $250 award and reflects the university’s gratitude for her efforts.