Tag Archive for English Department

Tölölyan Interviewed by French Publication

Khachig Tölölyan, professor of letters, professor of English, founder and editor of Diaspora: A Journal of Transnational Studies, was interviewed by the French weekly publication L’Express about Thomas Pynchon on Oct. 6. The article is online, in French.

Tölölyan Keynote Speaker at International Diaspora Conference

Khachig Tölölyan, professor of letters, professor of English, editor of “Diaspora,” was one of two keynote speakers at a conference on “Diaspora as a resource: Comparative Studies in Strategies, Networks and Urban Space.” The international event was held in Hamburg, Germany June 4-6. Tölölyan’s interests include diasporas, transnationalism, the world/globe polarity and the Armenian diaspora.

English Graduates Speak About Experiences in the Field

The English Majors Committee and the English Department sponsored English Major Grads Take on the World Dec. 10 in Downey House. The event's panel included, from left, Jim Kubat, associate director for career development; Amy Tang, assistant professor of English, assistant professor of American studies; book author Sophie Pollitt-Cohen '09 and <em>New Yorker</em> staff writer Ariel Levy '96. The audience watched a video clip of Levy, who was recently interviewed on The Colbert Report.

The English Majors Committee and the English Department sponsored "English Major Grads Take on the World," Dec. 10 in Downey House. The event's panel included, from left, Jim Kubat, associate director for career development; Amy Tang, assistant professor of English, assistant professor of American studies; book author Sophie Pollitt-Cohen '09 and staff writer of The New Yorker, Ariel Levy '96. The audience watched a video clip of Levy, who was recently interviewed on "The Colbert Report."

 

Joel Pfister, the Kenan Professor of the Humanities and chair of the English Department, holds a copy of Levy's book, <em>Female Chauvinist Pigs</em>. Pfister introduced the speakers and moderated the event.

Joel Pfister, the Kenan Professor of the Humanities and chair of the English Department, holds a copy of Levy's book, Female Chauvinist Pigs. Pfister introduced the speakers and moderated the event.

 

Kubat shared statistics and information on what Wesleyan English majors have done, and currently do. The even focused on how literature is equipment for living, and making a living.  Tang worked in several different fields before switching gears and earning her Ph.D from Stanford in 2009. Pollitt-Cohen is a book author and independent writer for The Huffington Post, The New York Times Book Review and other publications.

Kubat shared statistics and information on what Wesleyan English majors have done, and currently do. The even focused on how literature is equipment for living, and making a living. Tang worked in several different fields before switching gears and earning her Ph.D from Stanford in 2009. Pollitt-Cohen is an author and independent writer for The Huffington Post, The New York Times Book Review and other publications.

 

More than 70 students attended the event. Pictured in back are Anne Greene, director of Writing Programs, director of the Wesleyan Writers Conference and adjunct professor of English; and Andy Szegedy-Maszak, the Jane A. Seney Professor of Green, professor of classical studies and chair of the Classical Studies Department.

More than 70 students attended the event. Pictured in back are Anne Greene, director of Writing Programs, director of the Wesleyan Writers Conference and adjunct professor of English; and Andy Szegedy-Maszak, the Jane A. Seney Professor of Greek, professor of classical studies and chair of the Classical Studies Department.

Pfister’s The Yale Indian Profiles Roe Cloud

New book by Joel Pfister.

New book by Joel Pfister.

American history has almost completely edited out Henry Roe Cloud from its story, even though this full-blood Winnebago was one of the most accomplished and celebrated American Indians in the first half of the twentieth century.  Joel Pfister’s The Yale Indian: The Education of Henry Roe Cloud corrects this omission.

Pfister, chair of the English Department and the Kenan Professor of the Humanities, and former chair of the American Studies Program, began exploring American Indian archives when he was a Yale doctoral student in the 1980s and started his research on Yale’s Roe Cloud letters in 1995.  Very little has been published about the experiences of the few American Indians who beat tremendous odds to make it to college in the early 1900s.  Pfister aimed to find out more about the undergraduate years of one of the most inspiring advocates of higher education for Native Americans.

Next year marks the 100th anniversary of Roe Cloud’s graduation from Yale College in 1910.  His portrait does not hang in Yale’s Sterling Memorial Library,

Poet, Fiction Writer Speak at Distinguished Writers Series

As part of the Writing at Wesleyan Russell House Series, poet Bernadette Mayer spoke and read prose Oct. 14. Mayer is the author of more than two dozen volumes of poetry, including Midwinter Day, Sonnets, The Desires of Mothers to Please Others in Letters, and Poetry State Forest. A former director of the Poetry Project at St. Mark's Church in the Bowery and co-editor of the conceptual magazine 0 to 9, Mayer has been a key figure on the New York poetry scene for decades.

As part of the Distinguished Writers Series at Wesleyan, poet Bernadette Mayer spoke and read prose Oct. 14. Mayer is the author of more than two dozen volumes of poetry, including Midwinter Day, Sonnets, The Desires of Mothers to Please Others in Letters, and Poetry State Forest. A former director of the Poetry Project at St. Mark's Church in the Bowery and co-editor of the conceptual magazine 0 to 9, Mayer has been a key figure on the New York poetry scene for decades.

Mayer's visit was organized by Elizabeth Willis, the Shapiro-Silverberg Associate Professor of Creative Writing, associate professor of English.

Mayer's visit was organized by Elizabeth Willis, the Shapiro-Silverberg Associate Professor of Creative Writing, associate professor of English.

Fiction writer John Brandon spoke on Oct. 21. Brandon is the author of the novel Arkansas and the forthcoming novel The Semester. He is currently the Grisham Writer-in-Residence at University of Mississippi.

Fiction writer John Brandon spoke on Oct. 21. Brandon is the author of the novel Arkansas and the forthcoming novel The Semester. He is currently the Grisham Writer-in-Residence at University of Mississippi.

Brandon's visit was organized by Deb Olin Unferth, assistant professor of English. (Photos by Jeffrey Katzin '10)

Brandon's visit was organized by Deb Olin Unferth, assistant professor of English. (Photos by Jeffrey Katzin '10)

For more information on the Distinguished Writers Series go to: http://www.wesleyan.edu/writing/distinguished_writers/

Deb Olin Unferth: New English Department Faculty Member

Deb Olin Unferth joined the Department of English in fall.

Deb Olin Unferth joined the Department of English in fall.

Deb Olin Unferth has joined the Department of English as assistant professor. She specializes in fiction writing, innovative literature, the short story and the novel.

She says she was attracted to Wesleyan because of its well-known writing program.

“Wesleyan is a fantastic liberal arts school,” Unferth says. “I am very excited to be here. I am enjoying my classes immensely. The students are excellent—in ability, focus, creativity, intelligence, and temperament.”

Unferth has a B.A. in philosophy with distinction from the University of Colorado, where she was Phi Beta Kappa. In 1998, she earned her M.F.A. in creative writing from Syracuse University.

Unferth’s debut novel Vacation was published by McSweeney’s in October 2008. The book garnered her the Virginia Commonwealth University Cabell First Novelist Award for 2009.

Reed Guest Author at Festival of Reading

Kit Reed

Kit Reed

Kit Reed, resident writer in the English Department, participated in the 17th Annual Festival of Reading in St. Petersburg, Fla., Oct. 24.  Reed was one of dozens of authors who spoke to the community about a particular book.

According to the St. Petersburg Times Festival author biography, Reed is “One of our brightest cultural commentators. ” Often anthologized, her short stories appear in venues ranging from The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Asimov’s SF and Omni to The Yale Review, The Kenyon Review and The Norton Anthology of American Literature.

During the festival, Reed spoke about her book, Enclave.

Faculty Kick-Off Writing Programs’s Fall Readings

Anne Greene, director of Writing Programs, adjunct professor of English, introduces the Writing Programs' Fall Faculty Reading series Sept. 23 in Russell House.

Anne Greene, director of Writing Programs, adjunct professor of English, introduces the Writing Programs' Fall Faculty Reading series Sept. 23 in Russell House.

Deb Olin Unferth, assistant professor of English, reads from her work. Unferth is the author of a collection of stories, Minor Robberies, and a novel, Vacation, both published by McSweeney’s. Her work has appeared in Harper’s, 3rd Bed, Fence, and other publications. She has received a Pushcart Prize, a Creative Capital Grant from the Warhol Foundation, and in 2009 the Cabell First Novelist Award.

Deb Olin Unferth, assistant professor of English, reads from her work. Unferth is the author of a collection of stories, Minor Robberies, and a novel, Vacation, both published by McSweeney’s. Her work has appeared in Harper’s, 3rd Bed, Fence, and other publications. She has received a Pushcart Prize, a Creative Capital Grant from the Warhol Foundation, and in 2009 the Cabell First Novelist Award.

Poetry and nonfiction by Lisa Cohen, assistant professor of English, have appeared in numerous journals, including Ploughshares, Lit, Barrow Street, GLQ, Fashion Theory, Bookforum, The Boston Review, and Voice Literary Supplement. She is currently completing a group biography of three early 20th century figures—the fashion professional Madge Garland, the fan and collector Mercedes de Acosta, and the eccentric scholar Esther Murphy.

Poetry and nonfiction by Lisa Cohen, assistant professor of English, have appeared in numerous journals, including Ploughshares, Lit, Barrow Street, GLQ, Fashion Theory, Bookforum, The Boston Review, and Voice Literary Supplement. She is currently completing a group biography of three early 20th century figures—the fashion professional Madge Garland, the fan and collector Mercedes de Acosta, and the eccentric scholar Esther Murphy.

Elizabeth Willis, the Shapiro-Silverberg Associate Professor of Creative Writing, is the author of four books of poetry, Second Law, The Human Abstract, Turneresque, and Meteoric Flowers. Her work has been selected for the National Poetry Series and her awards include the Boston Review Prize, an award from the Howard Foundation, a Walter N. Thayer Fellowship for the Arts, and a grant from the California Arts Council.  (Photos by Stefan Weinberger '10)

Elizabeth Willis, the Shapiro-Silverberg Associate Professor of Creative Writing, is the author of four books of poetry: Second Law, The Human Abstract, Turneresque, and Meteoric Flowers. Her work has been selected for the National Poetry Series and her awards include the Boston Review Prize, an award from the Howard Foundation, a Walter N. Thayer Fellowship for the Arts, and a grant from the California Arts Council. (Photos by Stefan Weinberger '10)

To view upcoming guest speakers go to:
http://newsletter.blogs.wesleyan.edu/2009/09/22/writing-programs-announces-fall-faculty-readings/

Slotkin Publishes Book on the Civil War’s Battle of the Crater

NO QUARTER JACKET ARTRichard Slotkin, the Olin Professor of English Emeritus, is the author of the book, No Quarter: The Battle of the Crater, 1864 published by Random House on July 21.

No Quarter is a dramatic recount of one of the Civil War’s most pivotal events — the Battle of the Crater on July 30, 1864.

At first glance, the Union’s plan seemed brilliant. A regiment of miners would burrow beneath a Confederate fort, pack the tunnel with explosives, and blow a hole in the enemy lines. Then a specially trained division of African American infantry would spearhead a powerful assault to exploit the breach created by the explosion. Thus, in one decisive action, the Union would marshal its mastery of technology and resources, as well as demonstrate the superior morale generated by the Army of the Potomac’s embrace of emancipation. At stake

Slotkin’s Abe in Lincoln Anthology

A chapter from the novel, Abe, written by Richard Slotkin, the Olin Professor of English, emeritus, was reprinted in The Lincoln Anthology: Great Writers on His Life and Legacy from 1860 to Now, published by the Library of America No. 192, edited by Harold Holzer. The anthology was prepared in honor of the bicentennial of Lincoln’s birth, and is being sold separately and as part of a boxed set with Library of America’s edition of Lincoln’s writings and speeches.