Tag Archive for Hugo Black

Greenhouse Delivers the Hugo L. Black Lecture on ‘Writing the Truth in the Age of Trump’

Linda Greenhouse, the Knight Distinguished Journalist in Residence and Joseph Goldstein Lecturer in Law at Yale Law School, delivered the 26th annual Hugo L. Black Lecture on Freedom of Expression on April 20. Greenhouse, who covered the U.S. Supreme Court from 1978 to 2008 as a New York Times reporter, spoke about “Writing the Truth in the Age of Trump.”

On April 20, Linda Greenhouse, the Knight Distinguished Journalist in Residence and Joseph Goldstein Lecturer in Law at Yale Law School, delivered the 26th annual Hugo L. Black Lecture on Freedom of Expression in Beckham Hall. Greenhouse, who covered the U.S. Supreme Court from 1978 to 2008 as a New York Times reporter, spoke about “Writing the Truth in the Age of Trump.”

“Writing the Truth in the Age of Trump” Topic of Hugo Black Lecture April 20

Linda Greenhouse

Linda Greenhouse

Note: This event has been rescheduled for April 20.

Linda Greenhouse, the Knight Distinguished Journalist in Residence and Joseph Goldstein Lecturer in Law at the Yale Law School, will present a talk titled “Writing the Truth in the Age of Trump” during the 26th annual Hugo L. Black Lecture on Freedom of Expression.

The talk begins at 8 p.m., April 20 in Memorial Chapel.

Linda Greenhouse covered the Supreme Court for The New York Times between 1978 and 2008 and writes a biweekly op-ed column on law as a contributing columnist. She received several major journalism awards during her 40-year career at the Times, including the Pulitzer Prize (1998) and the Goldsmith Career Award for Excellence in Journalism from Harvard University’s Kennedy School (2004). In 2002, the American Political Science Association gave her its Carey McWilliams Award for “a major journalistic contribution to our understanding of politics.” Her books include a biography of Justice Harry A. Blackmun, Becoming Justice Blackmun; Before Roe v. Wade: Voices That Shaped the Abortion Debate Before the Supreme Court’s Ruling; The Burger Court and the Rise of the Judicial Right; and The U.S. Supreme Court, A Very Short Introduction. 

Greenhouse is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, where she serves on the council, and is one of two non-lawyer honorary members elected to the American Law Institute, which in 2002 awarded her its Henry J. Friendly Medal. She is a vice president of the Council of the American Philosophical Society, which in 2005 awarded her its Henry Allen Moe Prize for writing in the humanities and jurisprudence. She has been awarded 11 honorary degrees. Greenhouse is a 1968 graduate of Radcliffe College (Harvard), where she was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, and she currently serves on the Phi Beta Kappa national senate. She earned a Master of Studies in Law degree from Yale Law School (1978), which she attended on a Ford Foundation fellowship.

The lecture is named in honor of U. S. Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black. The series is designed to bring to the Wesleyan campus distinguished public figures and scholars with experience and expertise in matters related to the First Amendment and freedom of expression. This lecture, which is endowed by Leonard S. Halpert ’44, is offered annually.

For more information on the lecture, visit this website.

Stanley Fish Delivers Lecture on Freedom of Expression, Meets with Students

lec_hugoblack_2016-0218211535

On Feb. 18 the Wesleyan community gathered in Memorial Chapel to hear Stanley Fish, the Davidson-Kahn Distinguished University Professor and professor of law at Florida International University, deliver the 25th annual Hugo Black Lecture on Freedom of Expression. His talk was titled “Micro-aggressions, Trigger Warnings, Cultural ‘Appropriations’ and History: What’s Happening on Campus?”

Stanley Fish to Deliver Hugo Black Lecture Feb. 18

Stanley Fish (Photo by Jay Rosenblatt)

Stanley Fish (Photo by Jay Rosenblatt)

On Feb. 18, Stanley Fish will deliver the 25th annual Hugo L. Black Lecture on Freedom of Expression. The title of his talk is, “Micro-aggressions, Trigger Warnings, Cultural ‘Appropriations’ and History: What’s Happening on Campus?” The talk begins at 8 p.m. in Memorial Chapel.

Fish is the Davidson-Kahn Distinguished University Professor and professor of law at Florida International University; Floersheimer Professor of Law at Cardozo Law School; Emeritus Professor of English and Law at Duke University; and Dean Emeritus of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Distinguished Professor of English, Criminal Justice and Political Science at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He earned a BA from the University of Pennsylvania in 1959, and a MA and PhD from Yale University in 1960 and 1962. He has previously taught at the University of California at Berkeley (1962-74); Johns Hopkins University (1974-85), where he was the Kenan Professor of English and Humanities; and Duke University, where he was Arts and Sciences Professor of English and Professor of Law (1985-1998). From 1993 through 1998 he served as Executive Director of the Duke University Press.

Fish writes regularly on The Huffington Post.

The lecture, named in honor of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Hugo L. Black, is offered annually and endowed by Leonard S. Halpert ’44. The series is designed to bring to the Wesleyan campus distinguished public figures and scholars with experience and expertise in matters related to the First Amendment and freedom of expression.

Post Delivers 24th Annual Hugo L. Black Lecture on Freedom of Expression

Robert Post, dean and Sol & Lillian Goldman Professor of Law at Yale Law School, delivered the 24th Annual Hugo L. Black Lecture on Freedom of Expression Feb. 19 in Memorial Chapel.

Robert Post, dean and Sol & Lillian Goldman Professor of Law at Yale Law School, delivered the 24th Annual Hugo L. Black Lecture on Freedom of Expression Feb. 19 in Memorial Chapel. His talk was titled “The First Amendment, Knowledge, and Academic Freedom.”

The lecture is named in honor of the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice and endowed by Leonard S. Halpert, Esq., ’44.

The lecture is named in honor of the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice and endowed by Leonard S. Halpert, Esq., ’44.

Justice Aharon Barak to Lead Annual Hugo Black Lecture on Oct. 8

Aharon Barak

Aharon Barak

Aharon Barak, former president of the Israeli Supreme Court Interdisciplinary Center, in Herzliya, Israel will deliver the 23rd annual Hugo L. Black Lecture on Freedom of Expression at 8 p.m. Oct. 8 in Memorial Chapel. His talk is titled, “Human Dignity and Free Speech.”

Barak served as a justice on the Supreme Court of Israel from 1978 to 1995 and as president of the Court from 1995 to 2006. Earlier, he was Attorney General of the State of Israel and Dean of the Law Faculty at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. In 1978, Barak traveled to the United States as the legal advisor to the Israeli delegation in negotiating the Camp David Accords.

Much of Barak’s judicial work and writing has focused on the concept of a constitutional revolution brought about through the adoption by the Israeli Knesset of Basic Laws guaranteeing human rights.

The recipient of many international prizes and of 17 honorary degrees, Justice Barak was chosen in 1987 as a Foreign Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.  Among his books are The Judge in a Democracy (2006) and Proportionality: Constitutional Rights and Their Limitations (2012).

The lecture, endowed by Leonard S. Halpert, Esq., ’44, is named in honor of the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black. The series is designed to bring to the Wesleyan campus distinguished public figures and scholars with experience and expertise in matters related to the First Amendment and freedom of expression. Former Hugo Black Lecture speakers have included U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, Geoffery Stone, Lawrence Tribe, Jack Balkin, Lawrence Lessig and others.

Constitutional Law Expert Geoffrey Stone Delivers Annual Hugo Black Lecture April 18

Geoffrey Stone, the Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago, delivered the 22nd annual Hugo L. Black Lecture on Freedom of Expression on April 18.

Geoffrey Stone, the Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago, delivered the 22nd annual Hugo L. Black Lecture on Freedom of Expression on April 18. (Photo by Bill Tyner ’13)

Geoffrey Stone, the Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago, delivered the 22nd annual Hugo L. Black Lecture on Freedom of Expression on April 18.

The topic of this year’s event was “Justice Alito’s First Amendment.”

Stone explored the current state of constitutional jurisprudence, with a particular eye on the approach of the most “conservative” of the current justices. How they undertake the challenge of interpreting the often vague and open-ended guarantees of the Constitution? What explains their decisions in the most controversial cases, involving such issues as the constitutionality of campaign finance regulation, affirmative action, and gun control? He then turned  to Justice Samuel Alito’s approach to interpreting the free speech guarantee of the First Amendment to illustrate more general observations about the conservative justices and to illuminate Justice Alito’s own “vision” of the First Amendment.

Stone was admitted to the New York Bar in 1972 and has been a member of the University of Chicago’s law faculty since 1973. He served as a law clerk to Judge J. Skelly Wright of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit and to Justice William J. Brennan Jr. of the Supreme Court of the United States.

Professor Stone teaches and writes primarily in the area of constitutional law. His most recent books are Speaking Out! Reflections on Law, Liberty and Justice (2010); Top Secret: When Our Government Keeps Us in the Dark (2007) and War and Liberty: An American Dilemma (2007). He’s currently working on a new book, Sexing the Constitution, which will explore the historical evolution in western culture of the intersection of sex, religion and law.

Among his many public activities, Professor Stone is a member of the Board of Directors of the American Constitution Society, a member of the National Advisory Council of the American Civil Liberties Union, a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the American Philosophical Society, a member of the American Law Institute and a member of the Straight for Equality Project.

The lecture, endowed by Leonard S. Halpert, Esq., ’44, is named in honor of the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black. The series is designed to bring to the Wesleyan campus distinguished public figures and scholars with experience and expertise in matters related to the First Amendment and freedom of expression. Former Hugo Black Lecture speakers have included U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, Lawrence Tribe, Jack Balkin, Lawrence Lessig, Justice Harry Blackmun and others.

A commentary on “Professor Stone’s First Amendment Views and Its Jurisprudence,” written by Halpert for this lecture, is online here. (To download Halpert’s essay, open the link and save it to your desktop.)

Justice Scalia Delivers Defense of Originalism at Hugo Black Lecture

Antonin Scalia, associate justice of the U.S Supreme Court, delivered the 21st Hugo Black Lecture on Freedom of Expression March 8 in Memorial Chapel.

An originalist approach to interpreting the Constitution may not be perfect, but it’s “the only game in town,” was the message from U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonin Scalia when he delivered the annual Hugo L. Black Lecture on Freedom of Expression at Wesleyan on March 8.

“Do you think that judges—that is to say, lawyers—are better at the science of what ought to be than the science of history? I don’t think so,” Scalia told a packed crowd in Memorial Chapel. “The reality is that originalism is the only game in town; the only real verifiable criteria that can prevent judges from reading the Constitution to say whatever they think it should say. Show Scalia the original meaning, and he is prevented from imposing his nasty conservative views upon the people. […]

Supreme Court Justice Scalia to Deliver Hugo Black Lecture

Justice Antonin Scalia

U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonin Scalia will be the featured speaker at the annual Hugo L. Black Lecture on Freedom of Expression, which will be held 8 p.m., March 8, in Memorial Chapel.

Tickets to the lecture in the chapel were scooped up almost immediately, as were tickets for the simulcast viewing at the Center for Film Studies. The lecture will also be simulcast in CFA Hall, PAC 001 and PAC 002 where tickets are not needed and seats are available.

Justice Scalia’s speech will be titled “The Originalist Approach to the First Amendment.”

In addition to the speech, Justice Scalia will be meeting with a small group of students, have lunch with faculty, attend a performance of Professor of Music Neely Bruce’s “Bill of Rights,” share dinner with President Roth, members of the faculty and invited guests, and do a book signing.

The annual Hugo L. Black Lecture on Freedom of Expression is named in honor of U. S. Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black. The series is designed to bring to the Wesleyan campus distinguished public figures and scholars with experience and expertise in matters related to the First Amendment and freedom of expression.

This lecture, which has been endowed by Leonard S. Halpert ’44 since 1991, is offered annually. Hugo Black Lecture speakers have included Lawrence Tribe, Jack Balkin, Lawrence Lessig, and Justice Harry Blackmun, among others. A commentary on Justice Scalia and the First Amendment, written by Halpert for this lecture, can be found here. (To download Halpert’s essay, open the link and save it to your desktop).

“First Amendment is an Information Policy” Topic of Hugo Black Lecture with Jack Balkin

Jack M. Balkin was the 20th Annual Hugo L. Black Lecturer. (Photo by Emily Brackman '11)

The Knight Professor of Constitutional Law and the First Amendment at Yale Law School, Jack M. Balkin, spoke on “The First Amendment is an Information Policy,” during the 20th Annual Hugo L. Black Lecture on Freedom of Expression.

Professor Balkin received his Ph.D. in philosophy from Cambridge University, and his A.B. and J.D. degrees from Harvard University. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and writes political and legal commentary at the weblog Balkinization. Professor Balkin is the founder and director of the Information Society Project at Yale Law School, an interdisciplinary center that studies law and the new information technologies, as well as the director of Yale’s Knight Law and Media Program.

His books include Cultural Software: A Theory of Ideology; The Constitution in 2020 (with Reva Siegel); Processes of Constitutional Decisionmaking (5th ed., with Brest, Levinson, Amar and Siegel);

Leonard Halpert’s Commentary on Jack Balkin’s Hugo Black Lecture

The Knight Professor of Constitutional Law and the First Amendment at Yale Law School, Jack M. Balkin, will speak on “The First Amendment is an Information Policy,” during the 20th Annual Hugo L. Black Lecture on Freedom of Expression. The event will be held at 8 p.m. March 23 in Memorial Chapel.

The annual event is endowed by a gift from Leonard S. Halpert ’44, Esq. Halpert has provided the following commentary:

What are Professor Balkin’s views as to the parameters of freedom of expression, legal as set by the First Amendment, and by societal pressures and norms?

To understand his outlook properly as to the boundaries of free speech, first it seems useful to know his concept of interpreting the Constitution. His views are set forth in articles appearing in law reviews and texts.[1]

“First, we should be faithful to the text of the Constitution, its                  text, its underlying principles; second, we should understand that the Constitution is a democratic instrument and that we believe in democratic constitutionalism; and the third is that the Constitution