Tag Archive for linkedin

Wesleyan Offers New Environmental Studies Linked Major

Barry Chernoff, the Robert Schumann Professor of Environmental Studies, Professor of Earth & Environmental Sciences, professor of biology and director of the Environmental Studies Certificate Program, highlights the new Environmental Studies Linked Major and ENVS certificate program Sept. 11 in Usdan University Center.

Barry Chernoff, the Robert Schumann Professor of Environmental Studies, professor of earth and environmental sciences, professor of biology and director of the Environmental Studies Certificate Program, highlights the new Environmental Studies Linked Major and ENVS certificate program Sept. 11 in Usdan University Center.

From his home in Hawaii, Evan Weber ’13 can walk a couple hundred yards and be standing in the Pacific Ocean. Or, he can walk a couple hundred yards and be on the Ka’iwa Ridge, climbing through forests.

As a result of his fortunate placement, Weber grew up with a deep connection to the natural world and developed a sense of personal duty to preserve and uphold the “multifaceted wonder that is our home, Earth,” he says.

At Wesleyan, Weber plans to expand his appreciation and knowledge for the planet by double majoring in the new Environmental Studies (ENVS) Linked Major. The new area of study is more than an expansion of the Environmental Studies Certificate Program.

“My interest in environmental studies has to do with taking my spiritual, ethical and conservational ideas about nature and helping to disperse these ideas into the semi-functional globalized, industrialized, materialistic and political society that we are all members of,” Weber explains. “When one has the opportunity to know nature as place of solitude, a place for reflection, a thing

Allbritton Center Unveiled at Ribbon Cutting Ceremony

Wesleyan President Michael Roth '78, WHO, WHO, Elena Allbritton ’93 and Robert Allbritton ’92 take part in a Allbritton Center ribbon-cutting ceremony Oct. 2. The U.S. Green Building Council awarded the Allbritton Center renovation its highly-prized Gold LEED Certification. (Photo by Bill Burkhart)

Wesleyan President Michael Roth '78, Joe Allbritton P'92, Barby Allbritton P'92, Elena Allbritton ’93 and Robert Allbritton ’92 take part in a Allbritton Center ribbon-cutting ceremony Oct. 2. (Photo by Bill Burkhart)

With a ribbon-cutting ceremony Oct. 2, Wesleyan unveiled a facility that enables Wesleyan to focus resources, encourage curricular innovation, original research and scholarship, and foster greater public understanding and responsibility.

The new Allbritton Broadcast Center is located on the second floor.

The new Allbritton Broadcast Center is located on the second floor.

The Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life, which occupies the renovated Davenport Campus Center, will emphasize its academic engagement with the public sphere. The center continues Wesleyan’s commitment to preparing students for lives as active citizens and for leadership. It seeks to support Wesleyan’s tradition of the scholar-teacher by encouraging faculty research in a manner that directly benefits and enhances student learning.

The Center reflects changes that have transpired across the social scientific disciplines. These include the creation of new multidisciplinary ventures, the growing number of studies employing multiple methodologies,

Draper ’12 Interns at Cannes Film Festival

Nathaniel Draper '12 and his friend Matt Firpo (NYU '12) stand in front of Festival de Cannes emblem in the Grand Lumiere Theater. Draper was an intern at the Festival de Cannes.

Nathaniel Draper '12 and his friend Matt Firpo (NYU '12) stand in front of Festival de Cannes emblem in the Grand Lumiere Theater. Draper was an intern at the Cannes Film Festival in southern France.

For 15 days, Nathaniel Draper ’12 mingled with top filmmakers at the Cannes Film Festival while participating in educational workshops, seminars, pitch sessions, roundtable discussions and screenings. He also happened to pick up an award for a film of his own while he was there.

As a student intern at the 62nd annual Cannes Film Festival, held May 13-24 in southern France, Draper had a hands-on opportunity to explore the film industry through the prism of perhaps it most prestigious international event.

“It was, to put it lightly, a surreal experience,” Draper recalls. “I was able to meet iconic directors such as Martin Scorcese and Francis Ford Coppola, and found myself interacting with actors and directors such as Inglorious Basterds’ Eli Roth.”

Draper applied for the internship though the American Pavilion Student Filmmaker Program at Cannes, which is the festival’s center for American film and filmmakers.

Draper spent a week with avant garde filmmaker Jonas Mekas in Paris.

Draper spent a week with avant garde filmmaker Jonas Mekas in Paris.

The internship program included a three-day pre-Festival orientation and tour of Cannes, including workshops and seminars on the business of filmmaking; nightly festival premiers; roundtable discussions with industry professionals; and an opportunity to network with industry insiders and observe the business of filmmaking firsthand.

“I was granted full festival accreditation–basically a carte blanche to go anywhere in the festival, which allowed me to interact with filmmakers, explore the Cannes film market, and essentially network with the incredibly array of industry professionals that were there,” Draper says. “I took part in panel discussions ranging from screenwriters to the screen actors guild to premier directors.”

Service Learning Class Studies Local Cemetery

Elizabeth Milroy, director of the Art History Program and professor of art history and American studies, and Anne Calder '11 use a scanning tool to survey grave markers in the Washington/Vine Street Cemetery Oct. 2.

Elizabeth Milroy, director of the Art History Program and professor of art history and American studies, and Anne Calder '11 use a scanning tool to survey grave markers in the Washington/Vine Street Cemetery Oct. 2.

On Oct. 10, 1741, Mr. William Bartlit was laid to rest in the Vine/Washington Street Cemetery near Wesleyan University. According to his gravestone, Bartlit was “aged about 70 years” and was “the first interred in this yard.”

“Mr. Bartlit has the oldest marker in this cemetery,” says Elizabeth Milroy, director of the Art History Program and professor of art history and American studies at Wesleyan University. “We would like to find out more about him.”

Milroy, who is teaching the Service Learning Course AMST 205 “The Study
of Material Culture: Marking the Past in Middletown,” is assigning each of her eight students particular grave markers in the cemetery. Students will conduct research on a deceased person, while studying how artifacts can mark the history of space and place within the urban environment of Middletown.

John Hinchman, a lecturer and research specialist in the Architectural Conservation Laboratory of the Historic Preservation Program at the University of Pennsylvania, teaches Anne Calder '11 how to conduct a digital site survey using a total station. The equipment records the 3-D location of the corner of each stone on the site, and results in an accurate representation of the cemetery. Calder is enrolled in the class, "The Study of Material Culture: Marking the Past in Middletown."

John Hinchman, a lecturer and research specialist in the Architectural Conservation Laboratory of the Historic Preservation Program at the University of Pennsylvania, teaches Anne Calder '11 how to conduct a digital site survey using a total station. The equipment records the 3-D location of the corner of each stone on the site, and results in an accurate representation of the cemetery. Calder is enrolled in the class, "The Study of Material Culture: Marking the Past in Middletown."

In addition, students will gain a working knowledge of the theoretical approaches that have been applied to material culture studies, as well as practical experience in the physical and contextual analysis of artifacts and cultural landscapes.

On Oct. 2-3, John Hinchman, a lecturer and research specialist in the Architectural Conservation Laboratory of the Historic Preservation Program at the University of Pennsylvania, taught Milroy’s students how to use a “total station” and scanner tool to map the cemetery’s terrain and grave markers. The collected data is imported into engineering software AutoCAD, and as a result, the class will have a detailed and accurate map of the entire cemetery’s physical layout.

“There’s no paper work on this cemetery, so we know no more about who is buried here than what their headstones say,” says Augie DeFrance, president of the Middletown Old Burial Ground Association.

At the end of the semester,

5 questions with … Neely Bruce

Neely Bruce, professor of music.

Neely Bruce, professor of music.

The following is the second installment of The Wesleyan Connection’s new feature, “5 Questions.” This issue, accomplished composer and Wesleyan Professor of Music Neely Bruce is our guest.

Q: I see your piece Vistas will be performed at the “Hearts Pounding and Skins Taut” concert in late October at Wesleyan. For what instrument was this piece originally composed?

NB: Vistas at Dawn is a short (approximately three minute) piece for organ and vibraphone.

Q: For what musician did you compose this piece?

NB: I wrote it for Ronald Ebrecht, Wesleyan University Organist, to play. Over the years I’ve written two major works and several smaller pieces for him. Ron has been a staunch advocate for new music for the organ for years, and has encouraged his faculty colleagues and our students to write all sorts of music in all sorts of styles for that remarkable instrument. This has been going on for more than 20 years, and dozens, perhaps hundreds of new organ works have seen the light of day because Ron asked people to write them and offered an opportunity to get them before the public. Vistas was originally written for a tour that he did in Russia with a Russian percussionist, although he’s played it many times in the US with several different vibes players, including Wesleyan’s own Jay Hoggard. It’s something like a pop ballad—slow, languorous, very chromatic, sometimes almost atonal, sometimes with jazz-like quasi-standard chord changes.

Q: Aside from hearing Vistas at the Center for the Arts in October, where can people see you perform publicly this fall?

NB: October is an exceptionally busy month, even for me. I’m playing the world premiere of Twelve Fugues by Gerald Shapiro, chair of the Music Department at Brown and one of my closest friends. (Shapiro and I were freshmen together at the Eastman School of Music). I’m playing these pieces at Wesleyan’s Crowell Concert Hall on Saturday October 10 at 8 p.m. and at Brown on October 14, with a little Stravinsky and Ravel as the warm-up. The Bill of Rights: Ten Amendments in Eight Motets is being performed at Mitchell College in New London on October 20. For

Labyrinth Built in Honor of Joe and Kit Reed

The new Wesleyan installation, Labyrinth, was presented to Wesleyan to honor Kit and Joe Reed. Kit is an author and resident writer at Wesleyan and Joe is professor of English and American studies, emeritus.

The new Wesleyan installation, Labyrinth, was presented to Wesleyan to honor Kit and Joe Reed. Kit is an author and resident writer at Wesleyan and Joe is professor of English and American studies, emeritus.

“Every university should have a labyrinth, for it represents our desire to unravel the essential mysteries of human existence. It is a problem to be solved, a question to be answered, a paradox to be considered.  Each labyrinth has a center and, as a diagram of learning, its tangled patterns lead us to that hidden core.  Even as the pursuit of knowledge follows many diverging paths there is also a basic symmetry to these designs, a unified whole that pleases the eye and piques the mind.” – Stephen Alter ’77

This month, the Wesleyan community can leave the stress behind while taking a meditative walk around a newly constructed labyrinth.

Located between the Skull and Serpent building and the Davison Art Center Courtyard, the 30-foot-wide circular maze simply titled “Labyrinth”, is a result of six years of planning and alumni fundraising. Labyrinth was presented to Wesleyan to honor Kit and Joe Reed. Kit is an author and resident writer at Wesleyan and Joe is professor of English and American studies, emeritus, who taught film courses at Wesleyan from the mid 1960s until his retirement in 2004.

Labyrinth detail. (Photos by Bill Burkhart)

Labyrinth detail. (Photos by Bill Burkhart)

“Kit and Joe Reed represent the very best of Wesleyan’s labyrinthine traditions,” explains Stephen Alter ’77, who spearheaded the Reed project. “They have led us along paths that do not follow a straight or predictable route. They have challenged and provoked us with questions that digress from ordinary disciplines and discourse. They have surprised and inspired us with their humor, their eccentricities, and their love of literature, film and art. For all these reasons, we dedicate this labyrinth in their honor, so that future generations of Wesleyan students will trace these paths and discover the secrets that lie therein.”

Alter and Cheryl Sucher ’78, with help from University Relations, started raising funds from Wesleyan alumni who were taught by Kit or Joe Reed. They hoped to create a structure that would reflect the Reeds’ love of literature, film, “irrepressible imaginations, and above all, their subversive integrity.” With the Reeds’ input, the group

Tribute Service for Lebergott on Oct. 18

Stanley Lebergott.

Stanley Lebergott.

A service in tribute to Stanley Lebergott, the Chester D. Hubbard Professor of Economics and Social Sciences, Emeritus, who passed away on July 24, will be held at 11 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 18. The service will be in the Daniel Family Commons in the Usdan University Center and will be followed by a reception.

The Lebergott family invites friends and colleagues who may have photographs or remembrances of Stan to bring them to the service.

Lebergott began his career as a public servant, working for 20 years in the U.S. Department of Labor, the International Labor Office, and the U.S. Bureau of the Budget. He joined the Wesleyan faculty in 1962 as professor of economics, becoming University Professor in 1970. He was a pivotal scholar in his field, and a prolific author.

He is survived by his wife, Ruth, daughter Karen, and granddaughters StarRose Keyes-Lebergott ’10 and Sunshine Vogt ’98. In lieu of flowers, Lebergott’s family has asked for donations to be made to a scholarship being established in his memory at Wesleyan. Memorial gifts may be sent to Wesleyan University, 318 High Street, Middletown, CT 06459.

Jewish Community Celebrates Holiday in Student-Designed WesSukkah

WesSukkah, designed and built by Wesleyan's Architecture II research-design-build studio, is constructed with 1,600 culms of bamboo, measuring a combined 19,200 linear feet. The Wesleyan community is invited to the WesSukkah dedication at 1 p.m. Oct. 3 on Foss Hill.

WesSukkah, designed and built by Wesleyan's Architecture II research-design-build studio, is constructed with 1,600 culms of bamboo, measuring a combined 19,200 linear feet. The Wesleyan community is invited to the WesSukkah dedication at 1 p.m. Oct. 3 on Foss Hill.

Every October, Wesleyan’s Jewish community dwells in a temporary structure built for the festival of Sukkot. For eight days, students study, socialize, mediate, eat, host events and occasionally sleep in the religious building.

This holiday, the Jewish students will celebrate the Israelites 40-year journey to the Holy Land inside an airy, five-mound curving structure of carbon-steel clad in bamboo. Designed by 15 students enrolled in Architecture II, a research-design-build studio, the “WesSukkah” provides a sacred space that adheres to a complex, medieval Rabbinic building code.

“The students have crafted something which is both compelling and meaningful for Wesleyan’s campus,” explains the studio’s instructor, Elijah Huge, assistant professor of art. “The structure maintains its symbolic and literal connection to the broader landscape through its materiality and permeability.”

WesSukkah was honored with a 2009 "Faith and Form" Award for art and architecture from the American Institute of Architects. (Photo by Gideon Finck '11)

WesSukkah was honored with a 2009 "Faith and Form" Award for art and architecture from the American Institute of Architects. (Photo by Gideon Finck '11)

The students designed WesSukkah with 1,600 culms of bamboo, 46 high carbon steel pipes, six steel rods, five spools of monofilament test line and steel rebar. The structure will be dedicated at 1 p.m. Oct. 3 on the top of Foss Hill.

The final design is a result of an intensive sequence of research, design, fabrication phases and client presentations.

Initially, the project clients,