Tag Archive for tuition

Tuition, Residential Comprehensive Fees Increase by 3.7 Percent

At its meeting March 4, the Board of Trustees voted to increase tuition and residential comprehensive fees by 3.7 percent for the 2017-18 year.

Tuition and fees for the 2017–18 year will be $52,474. The residential comprehensive fee for first-year and sophomore students will be $14,466, for juniors and seniors, $16,446.

As always, Wesleyan will meet the full demonstrated financial need of all admitted students. Recent initiatives have eliminated loans for our neediest students and lowered overall student debt to levels far below the national average. Over the next four years, Wesleyan will phase in additional changes to financial aid that will result in higher grants for most students, as well as changes to student contributions, loan policies and other provisions that will benefit students and their families.

Wesleyan’s THIS IS WHY fundraising campaign, which concluded in June with $482 million raised, has seen the creation of 120 new endowed scholarships, and over $227 million in new endowment and annual funding to support financial aid.

As part of its affordability program, Wesleyan continues to offer the three-year BA option, announced in 2012 with the potential to save students about 20 percent on tuition. Since then, Wesleyan has seen a significant increase in the number of students taking advantage of this program.

Wesleyan Sets 2015–2016 Student Charges

For the 2015–16 academic year, total student charges will be $62,478 for first-year students and sophomores, and $64,324 for juniors and seniors

For the 2015–16 academic year, total student charges will be $62,478 for first-year students and sophomores, and $64,324 for juniors and seniors.

At its meeting Feb. 28, Wesleyan’s Board of Trustees voted to increase tuition and residential comprehensive fees by 2.1 percent for the 2015–16 year, reflecting the third year of linking tuition increases to the rate of inflation.

The increase is based on the three-year national CPI average of June 30, 2014, the latest full fiscal year available. As a result of this policy, Wesleyan’s student charges for first-year students and sophomores currently rank 14th among a peer comparison group, compared to 1st in 2011. A further decline is anticipated.

“We remain committed to keeping Wesleyan affordable for all students,” said President Michael S. Roth. “Through a generous financial aid program, Wesleyan meets the full need of all its students receiving financial aid, and we ensure that our students leave here without a heavy debt burden.”

The university’s affordability initiative also provides for an optional three-year degree program, saving families about $50,000 on their total tuition bill while retaining the core academic experience for students who participate.

Support for financial aid is the highest priority of Wesleyan’s current campaign, and the university has raised nearly $380 million toward a goal of $400 million.

For the 2015–16 academic year, total student charges will be $62,478 for first-year students and sophomores, and $64,324 for juniors and seniors (reflecting the 2.1 percent increase in residential fees). Tuition will be $48,704 for all students.

2.2 Percent Tuition Increase Pegged to Inflation

At its meeting on March 1, Wesleyan’s Board of Trustees voted to increase tuition and residential comprehensive fees by 2.2 percent for the 2014–15 year, reflecting the second year of a new policy to link tuition increases to inflation.

The increase is based on the three-year national CPI average of June 30, 2013, the latest full fiscal year available. The Board adopted a three-year average in order to reduce year-to-year fluctuations in tuition increases.

“We’re committed to keeping Wesleyan affordable for all our students,” said President Michael Roth. “We’re holding down our tuition increases, ensuring that our students graduate not burdened by heavy debt, and providing a generous financial aid program.”

To keep Wesleyan affordable, the university meets the full demonstrated need of all admitted students who receive financial aid. Need-based support represents a commitment of about $51 million in the university’s budget next year. Wesleyan also has instituted an optional three-year degree program, saving families around $50,000 on their total tuition bill while retaining Wesleyan’s core academic experience.

Raising funds for additional scholarships is the top priority for Wesleyan’s $400 million fundraising campaign. To date, Wesleyan has raised $331 million toward that goal.

For the 2014-15 academic year, tuition will be $47,702 for all students. The residential comprehensive fee will be $13,226 for freshmen and sophomores, and $15,034 for juniors and seniors. Including the student activity fee, the total student charges will be $61,198 for freshmen and sophomores, and $63,006 for juniors and seniors.

 

Wesleyan Tuition Increase Smallest in at Least 3 Decades

At its March meeting, Wesleyan’s Board of Trustees voted to increase tuition and residential comprehensive fees by 2.9 percent for the 2013-14 academic year, a rise equal to the Consumer Price Index (CPI) rate of inflation.

This increase is significantly less than those for recent years, which have ranged from 3.8 percent to 5.0 percent.

“We are committed to reining in over time the price of a Wesleyan education and to meeting the full financial need of students who enroll,” said Wesleyan President Michael Roth. “By tying tuition increases to the rate of inflation, we are seeking to moderate the growth of costs in keeping with the goal of affordability.”

Wesleyan also is offering students the option of graduating in three years, saving families around $50,000 0n their total tuition bill while retaining Wesleyan’s core academic experience.

Financial aid is a key component of affordability, and next year Wesleyan will spend approximately one-third of its tuition revenue, or $50 million, on need-based scholarship support. Raising funds for additional scholarships is also the top priority for Wesleyan’s $400 million fundraising campaign, announced publicly March 1. To date, Wesleyan has raised $283 million toward that goal.

For the 2013-14 academic year, tuition will be $46,674 for all students. The residential comprehensive fee will be $12,940 for freshmen and sophomores, and $14,710 for juniors and seniors. Including the student activity fee, the total student charges will be $59,884 for freshmen and sophomores, and $61,654 for juniors and seniors.

Tuition, Financial Aid Increase for 2011-2012

Wesleyan’s Board of Trustees voted on Feb. 26 to increase tuition and residential comprehensive fees by 3.8 percent for the 2011-12 academic year.

Continuing its commitment to a strong financial aid program, Wesleyan will increase its budget for aid by 11.8 percent. Wesleyan admits first-year students without regard to their financial circumstances and meets, through grants and loans, the full demonstrated need of all students eligible for financial aid.

Tuition will be $43,404 for all students in 2011-2012. For freshman and sophomores, the residential comprehensive fee will be $12,032. For juniors and seniors,

Tuition Translation Celebration Thanks Alumni, Parents for Support

Wesleyan Tuition Transition 2010

University Relations held a "Tuition Transition" celebration March 26 in Usdan University Center to thank alumni and parent donors for their financial support.

Wesleyan Tuition Transition 2010

The ever-popular Wesleyan Cardinal made an appearance at the event.

Wesleyan Tuition Transition 2010

A tuition grant from alumni and parents through the Wesleyan Fund, along with the endowment, reduces tuition, room and board charges by nearly $20,000 per student every year.

Wesleyan Tuition Transition 2010

Red & Black callers passed out informational material and cookies. (Photos by Olivia Bartlett Drake)

Tuition to Rise 5%; Financial Aid 11%

Wesleyan’s Board of Trustees voted last weekend to increase tuition and residential comprehensive fees by 5% percent for the 2010-11 academic year.

Tuition will be $41,814 for all students in 2010-2011. For freshman and sophomores, the residential comprehensive fee will be $11,592. For juniors and seniors, the fee will be $13,176. The higher residential comprehensive fee for juniors and seniors reflects the higher cost of the options available to them. Juniors and seniors have access to apartments and houses in addition to residence hall rooms. They also have greater flexibility in dining options.

“Although we are mindful of the difficulties inherent in annual tuition increases,” says President Michael S. Roth, “in order to maintain our high quality liberal arts programs and our scholar-teacher model we must increase tuition in the coming year.”

Roth went on to say that “Wesleyan is financially stable and has a balanced budget because we have significantly reduced expenditures over the past two years. We are raising student charges by the smallest amount needed to maintain our fiscal stability.” After consulting with the Board of Trustees, Roth emphasized the importance of minimizing expenditures that do not directly affect the experience of students so as to reduce the need for significant tuition hikes in the future.

In the context of the tuition increase for 2010-2011, Roth emphasized the importance of maintaining access to Wesleyan through a robust financial aid program. The university expects financial aid expenditures to rise next year by 11 percent and is projecting an increase in health care costs of 10 percent.

Wesleyan has taken steps to relieve inflationary pressures on the budget in the long term. The university has reduced annual expenses significantly and is in the process of implementing approximately $30M in reductions to its annual budget. Steps taken include:

• curtailment or elimination of proposed construction projects
• an approximate 10 percent reduction in staff (mostly through attrition and a voluntary separation program)
• one-year salary freeze
• a 22 percent reduction in energy usage since 2004
• numerous additional reductions in specific budgets

Wesleyan also has increased enrollments in each class by 30 students (120 total) to generate additional revenue.

President Roth noted that Wesleyan is building its endowment so that more resources will be available to support educational expenditures in the future. In the coming years, the university hopes to triple the endowment for financial aid, adding the equivalent of 400 new scholarships.

Roth stressed that in this difficult economic period the university is still taking steps to offer students an enhanced educational experience. “We have hired 25 faculty members, and even as we secure our future financially, we are developing new curricular programs.”

Roth cited the new programs in Creative Writing, the College of the Environment and Middle Eastern Studies as examples of curricular enhancement, as well as an initiative that has added dozens of new small classes to the curriculum in a variety of fields. “Applications have soared by 30 percent in the last two years. Students across the nation and around the world see Wesleyan as the exciting school all of us know it to be,” Roth says.

Wesleyan Celebrates Alumni and Parent Donations

University Relations held a "Tuition Transition" celebration March 27 in Usdan University Center to thank alumni and parent donors for their financial support. Pictured, from left, Sarah Bell '09, Pam Vasiliou, director of the Wesleyan Fund, and Katie Borfshever '09 look over a poster on display.

University Relations held a "Tuition Transition" celebration March 27 in Usdan University Center to thank alumni and parent donors for their financial support. Pictured, from left, Sarah Bell '09, Pam Vasiliou, director of the Wesleyan Fund, and Katie Borfshever '09 looking over a poster on display.