Students Present Research at Neuroscience and Behavior Symposium

On May 1, the Neuroscience and Behavior Program held its second annual undergraduate research symposium. Arranged in the format of a professional scientific conference, seniors in the program presented their research done in faculty labs, while students and faculty in attendance enjoyed dinner at Daniel Family Commons. Five seniors spoke and seven other students presented posters on topics ranging from sonification of measures of electrical activity in the brain to the study of characteristics of neuronal membranes. About 50 junior and senior neuroscience and behavior students attended, in addition to the NSB faculty. (Photos by Dat Vu ’15.)

Matan Koplin-Green '15 spoke about his research on alpha neurofeedback training for the purpose of reducing anxiety levels.

Matan Koplin-Green ’15 spoke about his research on alpha neurofeedback training for the purpose of reducing anxiety levels.

From left, Aarit Ahuja '16, Rebecca Tom '16, and Vaishvi Jhaveri '18. Ahuja and Tom presented their poster titled, "Optogenetic Activation of the Central Amygdala Generates Addiction-Like Preference for Reward."

From left, Aarit Ahuja ’16, Rebecca Tom ’16, and Vaishvi Jhaveri ’18. Ahuja and Tom presented their poster titled “Optogenetic Activation of the Central Amygdala Generates Addiction-Like Preference for Reward.”

Min Cheol Lee '15 presented his poster, "Investigating Voice Feedback Control and its Possible Relationship with Empathy."

Min Cheol Lee ’15 presented his poster, “Investigating Voice Feedback Control and Its Possible Relationship with Empathy.”

Shenghao (Isis) Chen '15 presented a poster on "Cognitive Processing of Guilt and Shame."

Shenghao (Isis) Chen ’15 presented a poster on “Cognitive Processing of Guilt and Shame.”

Dan Lawrence '15 spoke on "The Effects of Striatal Enriched Tyrosine Phosphates (STEP) Inhibition on Epileptogenesis."

Dan Lawrence ’15 spoke on “The Effects of Striatal Enriched Tyrosine Phosphates (STEP) Inhibition on Epileptogenesis.”

Ellen Lesser '15 gave a talk, "Biting Off More Than A Cue: Incentive Salience in Lifetime and Prenatal Exposure to Junk Food."

Ellen Lesser ’15 gave a talk, “Biting Off More Than A Cue: Incentive Salience in Lifetime and Prenatal Exposure to Junk Food.”