Olivia DrakeMay 24, 20111min
Jan Naegele, professor of biology, professor of neuroscience and behavior, is the author of "Tangled Roots: Digging Deeper into Astrocyte or Interneuron Dysfunction in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy," published in Epilepsy Currents, Volume 11, Issue 1, 2011. The article is online here. She's also the author of "STEP Regulation of Seizure Thresholds in the Hippocampus," published in Epilepsia by Wiley Publishers, 2011. The article is online here.

Olivia DrakeMarch 1, 20111min
Janice Naegele, professor of biology, professor of neurosceince and behavior, and a group of Wesleyan students attended the Connecticut Forum on “The Glorius, Mysterious Brain” Feb. 25 at the Bushnell Theater in Hartford, Conn. The Connecticut Forum is a nationally recognized, nonprofit organization that offers live, unscripted panel discussions among renowned experts and celebrities, and community outreach programs. Nagele’s group listened to Autism advocate Temple Grandin, author and Harvard professor Steven Pinker and cognitive scientist Paul Bloom. In addition, Michael Greenberg '76, chair of neurobiology at Harvard Medical School, spoke to Naegele's students about “experience-dependent changes in gene expression."

Olivia DrakeSeptember 2, 20101min
Jan Naegele, professor of biology, professor of neuroscience and behavior, received a $100,000 from the National Institute of Mental Health for her research on “Molecular and Cellular Analysis of Brand-Enriched PTPs.” The grant will be awarded through March 2010. This is a renewal of a previous grant, which is subcontracted with Yale University.

Olivia DrakeJune 28, 20101min
Laura Grabel, the Lauren B. Dachs Professor of Science and Society, professor of biology, and Jan Naegele, professor of neuroscience and behavior, professor of biology, are the co-authors of “Migration of transplanted neural stem cells in experimental models of neurodegenerative diseases,” published in Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine by Springer/Humana Press, 2010.

Olivia DrakeMay 12, 20101min
Janice Naegele, professor of biology, professor of neuroscience and behavior, is the co-author of “Gene and stem cell therapies for treating epilepsy,” published in Epilepsy: Mechanisms, Models, and Translational Perspectives, Dekker M, Inc., 2010; “Migration of transplanted neural stem cells in models of neurodegenerative diseases,” published in  Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine by Springer Science (Humana Press, 2010; “Westward Ho! Pioneering mouse models for X-linked infantile spasms syndrome,” published in Epilepsy Currents 10(1): 1-4, 2010; “Trekking through the telencephalon: hepatocyte growth factor-mediated guidance for parvalbumin-expressing interneurons,” published in Epilepsy Currents 10(4), 2010; and “Transplants for brain repair in epilepsy and…

David PesciJuly 14, 20093min
Ann Burke, associate professor of biology, recently received a three-year, $395,000 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to study the development and evolution of the shoulder girdle using transgenic mice, frog and salamander. The mice will be generated in collaboration with a lab at the University of Michigan and will allow Burke and her associates to turn off Hox genes, which are specific patterning genes, in specific sub populations of the embryonic mesoderm that make the musculoskeletal tissues. "Comparing the dynamics of gene expression and cell interactions during the formation of the pectoral region in a variety of embryos…

Olivia DrakeMay 19, 20091min
Jan Naegele, professor of neuroscience and behavior, professor and chair of biology, was honored for her innovative work in bioscience by the organization “We Work For Health" overseen by the Connecticut Consortium of Independent Colleges on May 18. Congressman Joe Courtney presented a plaque to Naegele’s designee, Deborah Hall '11 at a ceremony in Cromwell, Conn.

Olivia DrakeSeptember 23, 20081min
Janice Naegele, professor of neuroscience and behavior, professor and chair of biology, is the co-recipient of a grant from the Fragile X Foundation worth $69,450 for the "Role of STEP in Fragile X Syndrome." The grant was awarded May 1. Fragile X is the most common inherited cause of mental impairment and the most common known cause of autism. About 25 percent of children with Fragile X have seizures and epilepsy. The grant will support research on the causes and potential treatments for epilepsy in a mouse model of Fragile X. In addition to the grant, Professor Naegele and her…