Randi Alexandra Plake

Actor, Director Schaal ’06 Returns to Campus for Sold-Out Premiere of Go Forth

Kaneza Schaal ’06 (Photo by Randi Plake)

Kaneza Schaal ’06 spoke to Wesleyan theater majors Sept. 15. (Photo by Sandy Aldieri of Perceptions Photography)

Actor and director Kaneza Schaal ’06 returned to campus for her New England premiere of GO FORTH (2015), a series of vignettes with projection, sound, and dance inspired by the Egyptian Book of the Dead. The four performances took place over the past weekend to a sold-out audience.

At a special lunch surrounded by a group of theater majors, one being GO FORTH ensemble member Cheyanne Williams ’17, Schaal explained how the Book of the Dead inspired her production: “I was drawn to the Book of the Dead after experiencing the loss of my father. I went to Rwanda for the ceremony and experienced a ritualized grieving process that helped me process his death.”

Schaal credits her time studying theater and psychology for preparing her for a creative career. “What I gained at Wesleyan was the opportunity to learn many languages, psychology, and theater, which all came together to how I make my work.” Furthermore, she explained that it was the faculty and staff who really supported her to go out and make what interested her.

After Wesleyan, Schaal came up in the downtown experimental theater community, first working with The Wooster Group, then with companies and artists including Elevator Repair Service, Richard Maxwell/New York City Players, Claude Wampler, Jay Scheib, New York City Opera and National Public Radio. Schaal is an Arts-in-Education advocate and just returned from a new project with the International Children’s Book Library in Munich, Germany working with young Syrian and Eritrean refugees to address migration and storytelling.

Transportation Services’ New 14-Passenger Bus Moves Students More Efficiently

Wesleyan’s Transportation Department announces the addition of a new 14-passenger bus to the Wesleyan RIDE system fleet.

Wesleyan’s Transportation Department announces the addition of a new 14-passenger bus to the Wesleyan RIDE system fleet.

Wesleyan’s Transportation Services Department announces the addition of a new 14-passenger bus to the Wesleyan RIDE system fleet. The RIDE is a free shuttle service with 17 stops around campus. The department also provides a free off-campus grocery shuttle service to Price Chopper and Aldi on Sunday afternoons.

“Adding this bus to the RIDE program will allow us to move more people, more efficiently, and more comfortably,” said Joe Martocci, transportation services manager.

The RIDE shuttles are available seven nights a week, and Martocci says volume picks up on the weekends.

“We move over 500 students every weekend. The idea to add another vehicle was to make it more enjoyable for students to use the shuttles,” he explained. On the weekends, there are now three vehicles in rotation to meet the high demand of students who need a safe way to get around campus at night. All are equipped with GPS units so students can see their location from a mobile app.

Joe Martocci, transportation services manager, explains the features of the RIDE's new 14-passenger bus.

Joe Martocci, transportation services manager, explains the features of the new 14-passenger bus. (Photos by Randi Plake)

Martocci, who has worked at Wesleyan for 11 years, says the changes to the RIDE come from listening to the students and seeking advice from Public Safety Director Scott Rohde.

“We have changed some of the stops. Adding a larger vehicle and modifying the routes will be an experiment, but historically when students suggest ideas, we listen.”

Moreover, Martocci and his crew have added new shuttle stops signs around campus. The new signs are reflective and more identifiable for students on the RIDE.

Martocci notes that the bus provides comfort as well as safety features. Well-lighted on both the inside and outside, with rows of comfortable leather seats, it is also spacious, with enough room for students to enter and exit the bus quickly. Additionally, four video cameras provide an extra layer of security for all who are riding the bus.

To learn more about RIDE and the other services offered by the Transportation department, click here. Students can download the mobile app—Wes Shuttle (iTunes and Android)—and see where the shuttle is in real-time. Persons with disabilities can access special shuttle services by calling 860-982-8031 (day) or 860-685-3788 (evenings).

Lerer ’76 Interviewed By Slate Magazine on the Evolution of Children’s Literature

Seth Lerer ’76, literary critic and Distinguished Professor of Literature at the University of California at San Diego, spoke to Slate.com on the complex history of children’s literature.

“The earliest kids books…were largely designed to teach moral behavior,” he said. “They were about social decorum and a particular way of being a child, especially in relation to parents and teachers. Some children’s books—many of the early medieval romances, for instance—had an adventure quality to them, but always a moral and spiritual quality too.”

He also observed the increasing focus on young women in today’s literature. “When you look at the trajectory of modern books, Harriet the Spy, Judy Blume—books from the ’60s and ’70s—and then at Hermione in Harry Potter, who’s very much a modern YA heroine, and at The Hunger Games, you see children’s literature really moving toward an audience of younger women in particular, who face particular challenges and really develop their heroic lives.”

Lerer, the author of Children’s Literature: A Reader’s History from Aesop to Harry Potter, was awarded the National Book Critics Circle Award in Criticism in 2009 and the Truman Capote Award for Literary Criticism in 2010.

Read the full interview here.

McGill ’16 Screens Short Film at Princeton Film Festival

Adam_McGill

Adam McGill ’16

Film studies major Adam McGill ’16 screened his short film Punked! at the Princeton Student Film Festival this summer. McGill’s comedy is about a punk rock singer and guitarist named Dale, whose allegiance to his music is challenged when a new romance enters his life.

McGill filmed the short in the fall of 2015 as a senior thesis project at Wesleyan. During his time at Wesleyan, McGill was taught by Jeanine Basinger, the Corwin-Fuller Professor of Film Studies, who said, “I’m happy to see his work recognized outside the classroom. He joins a long line of Wesleyan film majors who have gone on to great things after they leave Wesleyan. It’s lots of fun to watch this happen.”

Since graduating in May, McGill worked on small sets in the New York City area and he’s currently interning at Sony Pictures Classics, a film distributor, working with their marketing team.

Punked! also will be playing later this September at the Golden Door International Film Festival in Jersey City, N.J. View his film online here.

Weaver MALS ’75, CAS ’76 to Co-Direct Smithsonian’s Video Game Pioneers Archive

ChristopherWeaverChris Weaver MALS ’75, CAS ’76, visiting professor in the College of Integrative Sciences at Wesleyan, was appointed co-director of the Video Game Pioneers Archive at the Smithsonian Institute’s Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation. This one-of-a-kind initiative will record oral-history interviews with first-generation inventors of the video game industry, creating a multimedia archive that will preserve the evolution of the industry in the words of its founders. The archive will offer scholars and the public the opportunity to better understand the personalities, technologies, and social forces that have driven interactive media to become one of the largest entertainment businesses of all time.

The Lemelson Center became interested in the video game industry while working to acquire the basement laboratory of the late Ralph Baer, considered the father of the video game industry. The Baer family and the Smithsonian wanted to expand on the importance of video games in today’s society so they tapped Weaver, someone with his own remarkable career in the industry and a close friend of Baer, to take the helm as external director, working side-by-side with Arthur Daemmrich, director of the Lemelson Center. This partnership has resulted in the creation of the Video Game Pioneers Archive, a long-term, massive undertaking—and a first for the Smithsonian—made even more unique by the fact that, according to Weaver, “no other industry in the history of technology has ever created anything like this. This archive will be a comprehensive recording of the creation of an industry as told by its founders.”

Solo Show by Weiner ’03 at Los Angeles Gallery

From http://bencharlesweiner.com

Textures of You from bencharlesweiner.com

Recent works by Ben Charles Weiner ’03, a New York-based artist, are on display at Mark Moore Gallery in Los Angeles. Artdaily.org praised the works in this exhibition, Textures of You,  as “lush yet uneasy,” noting that Weiner was inspired by synthetic body enhancement products and used a hyperrealistic technique to create the paintings. Read the full article here.

In a recent conversation with The Wesleyan Connection, Weiner explained the workflow and artistic style he used for these paintings. “Formally, my approach to painting these subjects takes inspiration from the stock textures used in graphic design and CG rendered imagery. I photograph these substances at close range, then use the same image as the source for multiple paintings, reformatting this image using analog means by painting it onto canvases of different sizes and dimensions. Thus, in both my subjects and process, I’m exploring the synthetic augmentation of the body and its expression.”

Weiner, who received his BA in studio arts from Wesleyan, later studied under Mexican muralist José Lazcarro at Universidad de las Americas (Mexico). He has also worked closely with artists Jeff Koons, Kim Sooja and Amy Yoes as an assistant. He notes that he still draws upon his experience at Wesleyan, explaining, “The work in my show is similar to the work from my thesis at Wesleyan in that both shows consist of hyperrealistic paintings of mass-produced ephemera from daily life. This new work takes inspiration from minimalism and pushes further toward abstraction than my earlier work.”

He has exhibited his work widely across the United States and in Mexico.

Bonin, Louie ’15 Co-Author Paper in Journal of Comparative Economics

John Bonin, the Chester D. Hubbard Professor of Economics and Social Science, and his former student Dana Louie ’15, are authors of a new paper published in Journal of Comparative Economics titled, “Did foreign banks stay committed to emerging Europe during recent financial crises?”

In the paper, Bonin and Louie investigate the behavior of foreign banks with respect to real loan growth during times of financial crisis for a set of countries where foreign banks dominate the banking sectors. The paper focuses on eight countries that are the most developed in emerging Europe and the behavior of two types of banks: The Big 6 European multinational banks (MNBs) and all other-foreign controlled banks. The results show that bank lending was impacted adversely during recent financial crises, but the two types of banks behaved differently. The Big 6 banks’ lending behavior was similar to domestic banks supporting the notion that these countries are treated as a “second home market” by these European MNBs. However, the other foreign banks in the region were involved in fueling the credit boom, but then decreased their lending aggressively during the crisis periods. The results suggest that both innovations matter for studying bank behavior during crisis periods in the region and, by extension, to other small countries in which banking sectors are dominated by foreign financial institutions having different business models.

“I am particularly proud of this collaborative publication because it does not stem from a student’s honors thesis, but rather from work that began with the Quantitative Analysis Center summer program and that Dana and I continued throughout her senior year in addition to her regular coursework,” Bonin said.

The paper is available online and will appear in a forthcoming hardcopy issue of the journal.

Walker ’79 Interviewed By Fortune on Women In Podcasting

Laura Walker (photo by Scott Ellison Smith)

Laura Walker. (Photo by Scott Ellison Smith)

Laura Walker ’79, New York Public Radio CEO, was recently interviewed by Fortune on the topic of women in the podcasting industry. She discussed how she got her start in radio, what business school was like for women in the 1980s, and why more women are needed in podcasting.

Walker discussed the motivation to help start Werk It, WNYC’s annual festival for women in podcasting, which is funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting to get more women involved in podcasting.

“I think that many women are natural storytellers and aren’t fearful of mixing the personal and the factual. I think also women often can ask tough personal questions…and they aren’t afraid to explore at deeper emotional levels. But most importantly I think it’s just that we need everyone’s voice.”

Read the full interview here.