Tag Archive for Class of 2013

Hayes ’13 Presents Research at International Economics Conference

Rosa Hayes ’13 presented her paper on yield spread during The Carroll Round, an annual international economics conference at Georgetown University, in April. The Carroll Round provides a unique forum for research and discussion among the world’s top undergraduates.

The goal of the Carroll Round is to foster the exchange of ideas among the leading undergraduate international economics and political economy students by encouraging and supporting the pursuit of scholarly innovation in the field.

Hayes’ advisor is Masami Imai, chair and associate professor of East Asian studies, associate professor of economics and director of the Freeman Center for East Asian Studies. She also has been serving as the head tutor of Quantitative Analysis Center’s tutoring program under Manolis Kaparakis, director of the centers for advanced computing.

Shervais ’13 Presents Fault Surfaces Research in Vienna

Kate Shervais ’13 presented her thesis research on “Examining Microroughness Evolution in Natural and Experimental Pseudotachylyte-bearing Fault Surfaces,” at the European Geosciences Union General Assembly in April. More than 11,000 scientists from 95 countries attended the conference, which was held in Vienna, Austria. Only 28 percent of the participants were students.

Shervais completed her study with Phil Resor, associate professor of earth and environmental sciences. Resor, who received a National Science Foundation grant to study earthquakes in an Italian fault zone, also attended the conference. The NSF grant supported their travel to the conference.

“I had a wonderful time and was able to discuss my poster and research with geoscientists from all over the world,” she said.

Read an abstract of Shervais’s paper here.

Seniors Produce, Direct “Minds of Makers” Documentaries in 3 Countries

Piers Gelly ’13 and Daniel Nass ’13 created a nine-part documentary series on “The Minds of Makers."

Piers Gelly ’13 and Daniel Nass ’13 created a nine-part documentary series on “The Minds of Makers.”

In Kilkenny, Ireland, a man spins wool from freshly shorn sheep into rich fibers. A furniture maker in South Pomfret, Vt. studies the natural geometry of wood he turns into tables, chairs and consoles. And in London, England, a silversmith wielding a hammer transforms smooth metal into beautifully shaped and textured bowls, vases and pieces of art.

These and other craftspeople are featured in a series of nine short documentary films produced and directed by Piers Gelly ’13 and Daniel Nass ’13. Each film in the series, titled, “The Minds of Makers,” shows the creative process of a craftsperson working in a different medium—wood, glass, metal, wool. The films are available to view on ArtBabble, a website created by the Indianapolis Museum of Art to showcase art video content.

Gelly, a College of Letters major, won the Writing Program’s Annie Sonnenblick Writing Award last spring and received a grant to travel around France, Ireland and England researching historical recreation. He planned “to visit places where groups of people attempt to preserve and recreate ‘pure’ craft practices for various reasons of historical authenticity.” The “crown jewel,” he explained, was a 13th century chateau fort in Burgundy called Guédelon, which workers are building from scratch using period technology.

When Gelly was home in Milwaukee that spring break, he met up with Jon Prown of the Chipstone Foundation, a Milwaukee-based foundation that promotes craft and design education and scholarship. The two discussed Gelly’s travel and research plans, and Prown said he’d love to have a series of videos made about the people Gelly would be interviewing. Chipstone offered financial support for the project. Gelly then asked Nass, a friend since freshman orientation and a film studies major, if he’d like to come along and work on the films. The two had previously collaborated on two issues of the 48 Hour Magazine, and on articles for Ampersand, the Argus’ comedy supplement.

Piers Gelly ’13 and Daniel Nass ’13 filmed craftsman Michael Eden in England.

Piers Gelly ’13 and Daniel Nass ’13 filmed Michael Eden in England. Eden unites tradition and modern technology in the intricate ornamental objects that he designs and creates via 3D printing.

Gelly attributes his interest in questions of tradition and history largely to the College of Letters curriculum, and, in particular, to conversations with Javier Castro-Ibaseta, assistant professor of history, assistant professor of letters, and Tula Telfair, professor of art and Gelly’s thesis advisor. In addition, two introductory film classes Gelly took as a freshman “definitely gave me some film knowledge,” he said.

Though Nass is a film major, he said he never had an opportunity to take Wesleyan’s documentary filmmaking course. Instead, he feels that two creative nonfiction writing courses he took—“Distinguished Writers/ New Voices” with Anne Greene, and “Intermediate Nonfiction Workshop” with Lisa Cohen—best prepared him to undertake this project.

“There’s a lot of commonalities [between writing and documentary filmmaking] with the process of gathering materials, conducting interviews and figuring out how to shape what you have into a narrative. The experience I got in those classes helped me a lot when I was thinking about how I want to put these films together,” said Nass.

Gelly and Nass traveled and filmed the documentaries through June and part of July 2012.

The craftspeople featured in the films include subjects from Gelly’s Sonnenblick research, family friends, and people they met through Chipstone.

“All our subjects seemed really pleased to be interviewed. Since most never explain their work to anyone step by step, this was an opportunity for them to share a huge wealth of thoughts and ideas that they normally don’t,” Gelly said. “Some of the most interesting things we discussed were the basics of working with their materials, which these people take for granted but which the rest of us never think to wonder about.”

Piers Gelly ’13 and Daniel Nass ’13 documented how the Cushendale Woolen Mills in Ireland uses turn-of-the-century manufacturing techniques to produce fine wool. The film is one of nine documentaries featured in the "Mind of Makers" series.

The Cushendale Woolen Mills in Ireland uses turn-of-the-century manufacturing techniques to produce fine wool. The film is one of nine documentaries featured in the student-produced “Mind of Makers” series.

Nass added, “For many of the people we interviewed, the work that they do just consists of doing. Often, when we would ask them a question about some specific aspect of their technique, it seemed like they would have to figure out how to articulate it. One thing that came up over and over again was the way that an acquired craft is kind of fundamentally not able to be articulated. You have to learn just by doing. They did their best to explain in words how their practices worked.”

Another common theme that emerged in the interviews, said Nass, was “the relationship between tradition and innovation.” For example, they interviewed a basket maker who was one of the last practitioners of a centuries-old craft. In contrast, another subject, who had begun his work in traditional pottery making, went on to creating intricate ornamental objects using new 3-D printing technology.

“Everybody was in some way informed by the past, and chose to either carry on tradition or create something completely new,” Nass said.

In the fall, Gelly and Nass asked some musically-inclined friends—including Ben Seretan ’10, Ashlin Aronin ’13, Jack Ladd ’15 and Danny Sullivan ’13—to contribute soundtrack music for the films.

The first five films went online at ArtBabble in January, and the last four appeared in late March.

Gelly said he hopes the films cause viewers to “take a second look at the objects around them.”

This coming summer, Gelly and Nass plan to make several more films in the series—focusing on American craftspeople—while they shoot a longer documentary for Chipstone about face jugs. As Nass explained, these stoneware jugs with clay faces on them were made by slaves in South Carolina over a limited period of time in the 19th century. “The project is still in its conceptual planning stages, but if all goes well, we’ll be in South Carolina conducting interviews,” Nass said.

Though neither student has concrete plans for the long term, Nass said, “I really love doing independent documentary work like this. I could definitely see myself continuing with it.”

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Student-Athlete Craven ’13 has Stint with Professional Hockey Team

Nick Craven '13 is majoring in neuroscience and behavior. He's played hockey at Wesleyan all four years.

Nick Craven ’13 is majoring in neuroscience and behavior. He’s played hockey at Wesleyan all four years.

In this issue of The Wesleyan Connectionwe speak with hockey player Nick Craven from the Class of 2013. Craven signed an amateur try-out contract with the Binghamton Senators of the American Hockey League in March. He played in each of the Senators’ games March 8-10 as they defeated the Conn. Whale, 3-0; knocked off the Rochester Americans, 4-3; and beat the Hershey Bears, 3-2.

Q: How old were you when you first developed an interest in playing ice hockey? How would you describe the opportunity you had to fulfill your ice hockey desires growing up in Ft. Collins, Colo.?

A: I first started playing hockey when I was 6 years old. That was the same year the state of Colorado got an NHL team. This allowed the sport to become much more popular across the state. I was immediately obsessed with hockey. As I grew older, my interest level only increased. Fort Collins had a decent youth hockey program, but by the time I reached the Bantam level, I had to travel to Denver in order to play for the top teams in the state. The older I got, the amount of traveling in order to pursue my hockey dreams continued to increase. In high school, the AAA team I played for traveled to tournaments across the United States as well as in Canada. As a consequence, I ended up missing nearly twenty days of school a year. At this point in my career, I decided to transfer to Phillips Academy in Andover, Mass. This decision allowed me to pursue both my athletic and academic desires.

Q: How did you become interested in attending Wesleyan and playing ice hockey for Head Coach Chris Potter?

A: Playing college hockey had always been a goal of mine. During my senior year in high school I did not have a specific college I wanted to attend. I spoke with a handful of Division III and a few Division I schools. I connected with Coach Potter in the fall of that year. He saw me as a player with a lot of potential. I noticed that the team was not very good; however, I saw that as a positive thing. Not only could I receive some playing time as a freshman, I believed I could help the program improve. Following my talks with Coach Potter, I had such a good feeling that I applied Early Decision II to Wesleyan.

Art Studio Majors Display Artwork at Senior Thesis Exhibition

View the talents of the seniors in the Art Studio Program of Wesleyan’s Department of Art and Art History. “Senior Thesis Exhibitions 2013” runs March 26-April 21 in the Zilkha Gallery.

The show, features drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, sculpture, mixed media and architecture.

“We’re all so proud of our senior majors. The four weeks of rotating Senior Thesis Exhibitions are a wonderful opportunity for the broader Wesleyan community to experience their remarkable work,” said Tula Telfair, professor of art.

Allison Kalt, Tiffany Unno, Ilyana Schwartz, Anna Shimshak and Christina You will display their artwork from March 26-31.

Piers Gelly, Zoe Albert, Ally Bernstein, Ryu Hirahata, Charles Ellis and Nichola Kokkinis will display their work April 2-7. A reception will be held from 4 to 6 p.m. April 3 in the gallery.

Melissa Arroyo, Christian Lalonde, Emily Schubert, Kerry Klemmer, Ethan Cohen and Marissa Napolitano will display their artwork April 9-14. A reception will be held from 4 to 6 p.m. April 10.

Alahna Watson, Adam Forbes, Caitlin Palmer, Arin Dineen, Jessica Wilson and Kevin Brisco will display their work April 16-21. A reception will be held from 4 to 6 p.m. April 17.

In addition, each student in the show was invited to select a single work from their Senior Thesis Exhibition for a year-end showcase held April 30 through May 25. A reception will be held from 2 to 4 p.m. May 25 in the gallery.

The public is invited and the exhibition is free of charge.

View the talents of the seniors in the Art Studio Program of Wesleyan’s Department of Art and Art History. The “Senior Thesis Exhibition” runs March 26-April 21 in the Zilkha Gallery.

The “Senior Thesis Exhibitions 2013” runs March 26-April 21 in the Zilkha Gallery.

Ilyana Schwartz's "Figures"

Ilyana Schwartz’s “Figures.”

Sociology Major Okun ’13: “Interdisciplinary Connections Are Part of My Everyday Thinking”

Evan Okun '13 is a Phi Beta Kappa honor society member, a slam poet, an improv rapper and a Senior Interviewer for the Office of Admission. He also teaches classes at the Connecticut Juvenile Training School in Middletown. (Photo by Olivia Drake)

Evan Okun ’13 is a Phi Beta Kappa honor society member, a slam poet, an improv rapper and a Senior Interviewer for the Office of Admission. He also teaches classes at the Connecticut Juvenile Training School in Middletown. (Photo by Olivia Drake)

Q&As with outstanding students are an occasional feature of The Wesleyan Connection. This issue we speak with Evan Okun from the Class of 2013. 

Q: Evan, you’ll be graduating this spring. How would you sum up your Wesleyan experience so far?

A: Wesleyan University encourages interdisciplinary inquiry while simultaneously supporting student efforts to put theory into practice. Earlier this semester the Sociology Department (along with other student and administrative groups) sponsored a panel discussion on the education system featuring the brilliant rap duo, Dead Prez. This served as the action component of my Senior Essay, which addressed exclusion in academia and incorporated readings from classes I took in Buddhism, psychology, chemistry, poetry, music and sociology. After four years studying with innovative professors, alongside an engaged student body, interdisciplinary connections have become a part of my everyday thinking. Concepts from organic chemistry facilitate a metaphorical understanding of sociological phenomena, and classes in English help translate these ideas into spoken word poetry. There are classes cross-listed in dance and biology. There are students double majoring in neuroscience and art. Single theses for mathematics and dance. This school is incredible.

Q: What are you majoring in and why?

A:  I am majoring in sociology and last fall completed a Senior Essay advised by Professor Alex Dupuy. This spring I will expand the essay into a longer work, advised by Professor Jonathan Cutler. I have always been fascinated by how the mind works. Sociology links micro level examination of the human psyche to macro level discussion of social phenomena. It allows students to investigate the environment from which they precipitate, all the while supporting efforts to dismantle oppressive systems.

Q: What have been your most memorable classes at Wesleyan?

A: I have taken many life-changing classes at Wesleyan, but the two most influential ones were Introduction to Buddhism and Paternalism and Social Power. These classes were particularly powerful because they implicated my own thoughts and subsequent actions in the perpetuation of suffering. The professors held me accountable for the negativity I brought to the world, while catalyzing class discussions about how to uproot the human tendency to be egocentric.

Q: Through Wesleyan, you’ve taught a class at the Connecticut Juvenile Training School in Middletown. Why did you get involved?

A:  During my sophomore year, I toured the Connecticut Juvenile Training School and stumbled upon a CD made by residents in the Music Therapy Department. It featured original songs riddled with powerful stories, innovative literary devices, and dope rhymes.

3 Student-Athletes Participate in Soccer Night in Newtown

From left, Jen Brewer '13, Madeline Keane '16 and Kaylin Berger '13 attended the Newtown Youth Academy Sports and Fitness Center for Soccer Night.

From left, Jen Brewer ’13, Madeline Keane ’16 and Kaylin Berger ’13 attended the Newtown Youth Academy Sports and Fitness Center for Soccer Night.

Three Wesleyan women’s soccer players, two of whom are graduates of Newtown (Conn.) High School, took part in  Soccer Night in Newtown Jan. 7 as Newtown continued to heal from the tragic incident at Sandy Hook Elementary School Dec. 14.

Team quad-captain Jen Brewer ’13 of Sandy Hook, Conn. and Madeline Keane ’16 of Newtown, Conn. were joined by Kaylin Berger ’13 of Farmington, Conn., at the Newtown Youth Academy Sports and Fitness Center for the festivities.

Nearly 50 major professional soccer players, including Major League Soccer (MLS) stars Landon Donovan and Kenny Cooper, women’s national team standouts Kristine Lilly, Christie Rampone and Mia Hamm, and former World Cup talent Alexi Lalas all made appearances with well over 1,000 Newtown youth benefiting from the opportunity. Soccer games, autographs galore and other soccer-oriented activity took place during the evening.

The night was the brainchild of Connecticut native Chris Canetti, president of Major League Soccer’s Houston Dynamo.He got five of his players to sign on and the number grew to about 50 in the professional soccer community, including MLS player Marcus Tracy of the San Jose Earthquakes, a native of Newtown. Newtown’s soccer community rallied around its sport to aid the town.

“Growing up in Newtown, most kids start playing soccer in kindergarten,” said Brewer, who attended Sandy Hook Elementary as a kindergartener and first-grader. “We all play in the Park and Rec leagues. Then travel teams in U-10 and above keep us active. Being a ball boy or ball girl at the high school game was a big deal, too. Our girls team (at Newtown High School) won the state title this year.” Wesleyan assistant coach Brian Matzke, who is part of the Connecticut Football Club that helped sponsor the event, recruited the three Wesleyan women’s soccer players to help out.

Brewer, Berger and Keane were assigned to help with the autograph lines. “We got to talk with a few of the players afterwards,” Brewer added. “All the parents and kids were so appreciative. They were happy to just get away from eveything that had been going on and have fun for a while.”

Read more about the event in this Hartford Courant article and SI.com article.

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15 Students with 93 Percent GPAs Elected to Phi Beta Kappa

Fifteen seniors joined Phi Beta Kappa honor society on Dec. 5. (Photos by Olivia Drake)

Fifteen seniors joined Phi Beta Kappa honor society on Dec. 5. (Photos by Olivia Drake)

Fifteen students from the Class of 2013 were elected to early-decision membership in Phi Beta Kappa during an initiation ceremony Dec. 5. Phi Beta Kappa is the oldest surviving Greek letter society in America, dating back to 1776.

Sociology major Evan Okun accepts his Phi Beta Kappa papers from Class Dean Louise Brown, PBK chapter secretary and marshall. Okun teaches a class at the juvenile detention in Middletown, which examines literary technique and societal inequality through rap songs.

Sociology major Evan Okun ’13 accepts his Phi Beta Kappa membership papers from Dean Louise Brown, PBK chapter secretary and marshall. Okun teaches a class at the juvenile detention in Middletown, which examines literary technique and societal inequality through rap songs.

The organization’s Greek initials signify the motto, “Love of learning is the guide of life.”To be elected, a student must first have been nominated by his or her major department. He or she also must have demonstrated curricular breadth by having met the General Education Expectations, and have achieved a grade-point average of 93 percent. Members of the Fall 2012 class all have GPAs of 94.48 percent or above.

Sally Bachner, president of the Connecticut Gamma Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa and associate professor of English, said for students elected in the fall, it is an especially exacting selection process and the election is an extremely prestigious one, because admittance is based on a student’s performance at Wesleyan only through their junior year.

“The students gathered here today represent a broad range of learning and commitment to excellence in a major, in some cases two or more majors, or a major that combines several disciplines,” she said, during the initiation ceremony. “These new members’ accomplishments during their years at Wesleyan should be a source of pride to themselves and to their families.”

Bachner was joined by the chapter’s vice president Anna Shusterman, assistant professor of psychology; chapter treasurer Steven Horst, chair and professor of philosophy; chapter secretary and marshall Louise Brown, dean for academic advancement/dean for the Class of 2013; and chapter historian Lorna Scott, assistant to the vice president for student affairs.

The elected students and their majors are:

Benjamin Abravanel, English and psychology; Evan Baum, chemistry; Julianne Edwards, biology, molecular biology and biochemistry, Science In Society; Scott Greene, chemistry;

Chapter by Sanislow, Regan ’13, da Cruz ’11 Published in Personality Disorder Handbook

Chuck Sanislow, Liz Reagan '13 and Katie da Cruz '11 and  are co-authors of a chapter in this newly-published handbook on personality disorders.

Chuck Sanislow, Liz Reagan ’13 and Katie da Cruz ’11 and are co-authors of a chapter in this newly-published handbook on personality disorders.

Assistant Professor of Psychology Charles “Chuck” Sanislow, Liz Reagan ’13 and Katie da Cruz ’11 the co-authors of a chapter titled “Avoidant Personality Disorder, Traits, and Type,” published in The Oxford Handbook for Personality Disorders, Oxford University Press, pages 549-565, in 2012. May Gianoli, formerly a postdoc in psychology and now at Yale, also was a co-author. Katie da Cruz is currently working on her Ph.D in school psychology at Michigan State.

Read the abstract online here.

South Korea’s Choi ’13 is a Freeman Scholar, Humanities Journal Editor

Art history major Claire Choi '13 co-founded PYXIS, a new online and print project that aims to share and celebrate student academic writing in the humanities at Wesleyan. She also plays Korean drums and learned French and German at Wesleyan.

Art history major Claire Choi ’13 co-founded PYXIS, a new online and print project that aims to share and celebrate student academic writing in the humanities at Wesleyan. She also plays Korean drums and learned French and German at Wesleyan.

Q&As with outstanding students is an occasional feature of The Wesleyan Connection. This issue we speak with Claire Seo In Choi from the Class of 2013.

Q: Claire, what are you majoring in at Wesleyan, and why?

A: I’m majoring in art history at Wesleyan. I attended art high school before I came to Wes, and have been always interested in how socio-economic and cultural circumstances have shaped artworks, so I guess it was quite a natural choice for me. Besides my major credits, I explored many different disciplines; I learned French and German, and took various courses from the College of Letters, Philosophy and Studio Art departments.

Q: Coming to Wesleyan from South Korea, what were the biggest changes you encountered?

A: The education system was one of the biggest changes I encountered. My high school curriculum was very art-centric and did not have room for students to design their own curriculums. On the other hand, Wesleyan encourages students to take the full advantage of liberal arts education and explore different courses outside one’s major. Language barrier and cultural differences were also challenging changes, but I think the people I’ve met at Wesleyan have helped me a lot to transit into a new environment.

Q: You are involved with PYXIS, a new student-run online humanities journal. What is your position in the project?

A: Earlier this year, my friends and I co-founded PYXIS. PYXIS is a new online and print project that aims to share and celebrate student academic writing in the humanities at Wesleyan. We publish peer-edited papers and thought-provoking articles, both online and in print. By doing this, we hope to establish a dialogue across the humanities

Purdy ’13, Kurash ’13 Named NESCAC Players of the Year

Adam Purdy ’13

Adam Purdy ’13

Between 2000 and 2011, Wesleyan garnered just four New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC) Players of the Year honors. The first came in the spring of 2001 when John Landay ’01 led Wesleyan to a 17-3 record in men’s lacrosse and a spot in the ECAC Championship game by leading the nation in scoring with 121 points on 73 goals and 48 assists. The following fall, Alexis Keeler ’02 paced women’s volleyball to a best-ever 30-6 mark and a spot in the NCAA Division III tournament with 548 kills and a .379 hitting percentage. She was all-New England and a third-team CoSIDA academic All-American. Volleyball catapulted the third Cardinal to Player of the Year recognition as Lisa Drennan ’09 became a two-time winner, grabbing the laurels in both 2006 and 2008. She earned all-New England honors both seasons and as a senior, was a second-team AVCA All-American and second-team CoSIDA academic All-American. Wesleyan was a collective 40-16 those two campaigns.

In the fall of 2012, Wesleyan accomplished a new feat – a pair of NESCAC Players of the Year in the same season. And not only the same season, but the same sport. Adam Purdy ’13, for the men, and Laura Kurash ’13, for the women, both gained supreme conference recognition from the soccer coaches of the NESCAC. It was a perfect evolution for both players as each was a NESCAC Rookie of the Year in 2009. Kurash, a high-scoring forward, also was a second-team all-NESCAC pick that year while Purdy, a goaltender, made the first team along with all-New England and third-team All-America honors. The next three seasons, Kurash found her way to the all-NESCAC first team and also gained all-New England and CoSIDA/Capital One District II academic All-America accolades in 2011. Purdy was a NESCAC first-teamer in 2011 to complement his all-New England status.

Laura Kurash ’13

Laura Kurash ’13

All the honors are not yet in for 2012. So far, Kurash has added CoSIDA/Capital One District II academic All-America recognition for a second year. Both are likely candidates for all-New England acclaim once again. Kurash was among the top three in the NESCAC for scoring points with 22 and goals with nine while ranking in the top 10 for assists with four. She ended her four years with 37 goals and 14 assists for 88 points, ranking her second all-time at Wesleyan in both goals and points. Of her 37 goals, 15 were game-winners. Purdy started every game in goal for Wesleyan since he arrived on campus, 69 in total, and posted a lofty 40-17-12 overall record. He recorded a school-record 31 shutouts over his four seasons and had a career goals-against average of 0.71 and a save percentage of .842. In 2012, he went 9-4-4 with a 0.62 goals-against average and a .836 save percentage with seven shutouts.

In 2012, Kurash helped her team to a spot in the NESCAC semifinals for only the second time in school history, the first coming last year. Wesleyan has qualified for the NESCAC women’s soccer tournament five times, four of those with Kurash on the roster. Purdy helped Wesleyan qualify for the NCAA Division III tournament for the fifth time in the last eight years and third time in the last four.

(Photos by Peter Stein ’84 and SteveMcLaughlinPhotography.com)

Stowell ’13 Writes, Edits, Translates 2 New Books of Poetry

Glenn Stowell '13

Glenn Stowell ’13

Glenn Stowell ’13, an economics major, is the editor and translator of, and an author of, two poetry books published in 2012.

Stowell recently edited, translated and wrote the introduction to Yan Jun’s You Jump to Another Dream, published by Vagabond Press.

Last spring, Stowell worked with Ao Wang, assistant professor of Asian languages and literatures, assistant professor of East Asian studies, on an independent study on translation of contemporary Chinese poetry. You Jump to Another Dream was the result of the independent study. Additionally, the Olin Fellowship provided Stowell with funds needed to travel to China this summer and to work with Yan Jun on their book.

Also last spring, Stowell’s first collection of poetry, Until We Leave, was published by Stethoscope Press, a Wesleyan-funded press.

Stowell began studying Chinese at Phillips Academy in Andover, Mass. and is completing his language studies at Wesleyan. He is the recipient of DKE international short story contest in 2010, was named a Wesleyan Student Poet for 2011-2012 and has been published in The Tulane Review.

In addition to being an author and full-time student, Stowell is currently a goaltender on the men’s hockey team, and is a former pitcher on the baseball team.

After Wesleyan, Stowell will work at Goldman Sachs in New York City, where he has signed a two-year contract.

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