Tag Archive for Dancey

Paper by Dancey, Masand ’15 Focuses on Congress’s Response to Deaths

Logan Dancey, assistant professor of government, and Jasmine Masand ‘15 are the co-authors of “Race and Representation on Twitter: Members of Congress’ Responses to the Deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner,” published in Politics, Groups, and Identities in July 2017.

This paper investigates the public responses of members of Congress to the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner and the subsequent protests and grand jury decisions. To do so, the authors examined members’ engagement with the issue on Twitter, which became a platform for public protest with such hashtags as #BlackLivesMatter and #ICantBreathe.

“We find that a member’s race is a more robust predictor of their engagement on the issue than is the member’s partisanship or the partisan and racial demographics of their district,” Dancey explained. “By showing that descriptive representation may overwhelm more traditional notions of district-based representation in responses to a racially charged issue, we further highlight the role descriptive representation in Congress plays in ensuring that the diversity of voices coming out of Congress reflects the diversity of voices in the public at large.”

Faculty, Students, Alumni Attend Political Science Conference

Students presented research at the 74th annual Midwest Political Science Association conference in Chicago.

Students presented research at the 74th annual Midwest Political Science Association conference in Chicago.

The 74th annual Midwest Political Science Association (MPSA) conference in Chicago April 7-10 was attended by several Wesleyan faculty members, students and recent alumni. The conference, held every April, is one of the largest political science conferences with more than 5,000 presenters from throughout the United States and around the world. It is traditionally held in Chicago’s historic Palmer House Hilton.

Assistant Professor of Government Erika Franklin Fowler, Assistant Professor of Government Logan Dancey, and Assistant Professor of Government Yamil Velez all presented research at the conference. They were accompanied by Joli Holmes ’17, John Murchison ’16, Grace Wong ’18, Anh Tuan Nguyen Viet ’16, and Eki Ramadhan ’16, students who contributed to and presented research.

Also in attendance were recent alumni Leonid “Leo” Liu ’14, who presented research with Fowler, and Matt Motta ’13, now a graduate student at the University of Minnesota.

Government’s Dancey, Fowler, Gallarotti, Lim, McGuire, Rutland, Schwartz, Wiliarty Published in 2013

Logan Dancey,  assistant professor of government, is the co-author of  “Heuristics Behaving Badly: Party Cues and Voter Knowledge,” published in American Journal of Political Science 57 No. 2, 312-325, April 2013.

Erika Franklin Fowler, assistant professor of government, is the co-author of  “Political and News Media Factors Shaping Public Awareness of the HPV Vaccine,” published in Women’s Health Issues 23 No. 3, e143-e151, 2013.

Giulio Gallarotti, professor of government, professor of environmental studies, tutor in the College of Social Studies,  is the author of “The Enduring Importance of Hobbes in the Study of IR,” published in e-International Relations, Jan. 10, 2013.

Elvin Lim, associate professor of government, is the author of “The Anti-Federalist Strand in Progressive Politics,” published in Political Research Quarterly, 66 No. 1, 32-45, March 2013.

James McGuire, chair and professor of government, professor of Latin American studies, is the author of  “Political Regime and Social Performance,” published in Contemporary Politics, 19 No. 1, 55-75, March 2013.

Peter Rutland, the Colin and Nancy Campbell Professor in Global Issues and Democratic Thought, professor of government, professor of Russian and Eastern European studies, tutor in the College of Social Studies, is the author of “Neoliberalism and the Russian Transition,” published in Review of International Political Economy20 No. 2, 332-362, April 2013.

Nancy Schwartz, professor of government, tutor in the college of social studies, is the author of “Introduction: Generations,” published in  Polity 45 No. 2, 245-248, April 2013.

Sarah Wiliarty, associate professor of government, director of the Public Affairs Center, is the author of “Nuclear Power in Germany and France,” published in Polity 45 No. 2, 281-296, April 2013.

Dancey’s Op-Ed on Linda McMahon Published in Hartford Courant

On Nov. 11, The Hartford Courant published an op-ed by Assistant Professor of Government Logan Dancey about Republican Linda McMahon’s second unsuccessful bid for Connecticut’s U.S. Senate Seat, despite spending more than $40 million in her campaign against Democrat Chris Murphy. Dancey writes that McMahon’s loss is reflective of a larger, nationwide decline in split-ticket voting. That is, voters now are much more loyal to one party, and less likely to choose candidates for President and Congress that belong to different political parties.

Government’s Dancey Teaching Course on Campaigns, Elections

Logan Dancey joined the Government Department this fall. He enjoys teaching Wesleyan’s “intellectually curious” students.

Assistant Professor of Government Logan Dancey started teaching at Wesleyan this semester—the perfect time, he says, to be teaching a course on Campaigns and Elections.

“The unfolding presidential and congressional elections continually give us new events to think about as we read and discuss broader theories about the importance and meaning of campaigns and elections,” Dancey says. And though Congress has mostly ground to a halt this election season—meaning a dearth of current events to discuss in his Congressional Policymaking class—the increasing polarization in Congress has led to many interesting and important discussions in that course nevertheless.

Dancey describes the students in his classes as “intellectually curious.”

“They ask great questions and consistently show a desire to really understand a concept or theory. The students definitely keep me on my toes, but ultimately it makes class discussion more interesting and thought-provoking,” he says.