Tag Archive for Gallarotti

Gallarotti Discusses Rising Tensions Over Russia, North Korea on Radio Program

Giulio Gallarotti

Giulio Gallarotti

Professor of Government Giulio Gallarotti was a guest recently on “Best of the Valley/ Shore” on WLIS/WMRD to discuss “Current Challenges of American Foreign Policy.”

“Our economy is doing well, the stock market is strong. The Fed’s been talking about raising interest rates, that’s how well we’re doing. And that hasn’t happened in a long, long time,” said Gallarotti by way of introduction. “There’s a lot going on all over the world and Americans are involved all over the world because we’re a global power.”

On recent tensions with Russia, he said: “I think it’s always been a kabuki dance, even at the height of the Cold War. It’s kind of like two very big people sharing the room. There will be a lot of friction, no matter who they are. Even in good times, they’ll always have issues. And in bad times, the friction will sometimes get to a crisis level. People will be very worried. I think that Russia is trying to solve a lot of different problems. Its main problems are domestic, not foreign, and a lot of the foreign policy is oriented toward maintaining some kind of stability in this political regime. Putin is using a lot of ‘rally around the flag’ tactics.”

Gallarotti elaborated on the problems in Russia, which include political instability, declining oil revenues, and a bad economy. And he said that the Russian people are “culturally comfortable” with being ruled by an iron fist throughout their history.

Listen to the whole interview here (scroll to “Valley Shore–41417–Wesleyan Government Professor”).

Gallarotti is also co-chair of the College of Social Studies, professor of environmental studies.

Gallarotti Speaks about the U.S. Economy on 1420 AM

Giulio Gallarotti

Giulio Gallarotti

Giulio Gallarotti, professor of government, spoke on WLIS 1420 AM/WMRD 1150 AM Connecticut radio (Valley Shore program) Oct. 10 about the U.S. economy. Gallarotti also is co-chair of the College of Social Studies and professor of environmental studies.

In the midst of an election campaign, Gallarotti says the American economy is doing well relative to other countries. The U.S. unemployment rate is presently 5 percent, and the budget deficit is less than 8 percent of America’s Gross National Product (GNP), he reported.

“I think the American economy is strong,” he said during the interview. “Our deficits and debt are not as big of a problem as most Americans think. A number of other countries have deficits and debts that are larger relative to their economies than ours are. Hence we are in less trouble than they are.”

Government’s Dancey, Fowler, Gallarotti, Lim, McGuire, Rutland, Schwartz, Wiliarty Published in 2013

Logan Dancey,  assistant professor of government, is the co-author of  “Heuristics Behaving Badly: Party Cues and Voter Knowledge,” published in American Journal of Political Science 57 No. 2, 312-325, April 2013.

Erika Franklin Fowler, assistant professor of government, is the co-author of  “Political and News Media Factors Shaping Public Awareness of the HPV Vaccine,” published in Women’s Health Issues 23 No. 3, e143-e151, 2013.

Giulio Gallarotti, professor of government, professor of environmental studies, tutor in the College of Social Studies,  is the author of “The Enduring Importance of Hobbes in the Study of IR,” published in e-International Relations, Jan. 10, 2013.

Elvin Lim, associate professor of government, is the author of “The Anti-Federalist Strand in Progressive Politics,” published in Political Research Quarterly, 66 No. 1, 32-45, March 2013.

James McGuire, chair and professor of government, professor of Latin American studies, is the author of  “Political Regime and Social Performance,” published in Contemporary Politics, 19 No. 1, 55-75, March 2013.

Peter Rutland, the Colin and Nancy Campbell Professor in Global Issues and Democratic Thought, professor of government, professor of Russian and Eastern European studies, tutor in the College of Social Studies, is the author of “Neoliberalism and the Russian Transition,” published in Review of International Political Economy20 No. 2, 332-362, April 2013.

Nancy Schwartz, professor of government, tutor in the college of social studies, is the author of “Introduction: Generations,” published in  Polity 45 No. 2, 245-248, April 2013.

Sarah Wiliarty, associate professor of government, director of the Public Affairs Center, is the author of “Nuclear Power in Germany and France,” published in Polity 45 No. 2, 281-296, April 2013.

5 Questions with . . . Giulio Gallarotti on China-U.S. Relations

Giulio Gallarotti, professor of government, tutor in the College of Social Studies, says all nations, even our closest allies, do things that cut against our geo-strategic interests.

In this issue of The Wesleyan Connection, we ask 5 Questions of Giulio Gallarotti, professor of government and author of several books and scholarly articles, including The Power Curse: Influence and Illusion in World Politics. Lately he has turned his attention to the U.S.-China relationship and its place in the geo-political world.

Q: Your recent work has taken you to the transition in much of the world from a Cold War stance to the coming “cold co-existence” between the U.S. and China. How would you define “cold co-existence”?

A: The future U.S. relations with China will be far different than the Cold War relationship with the U.S.S.R., even if the Chinese get closer to nuclear parity with the U.S. The two nations will be far more interdependent economically than the U.S. and Soviets; hence their fates will be far more interlocked. While we had almost no major economic ties to the Soviets during the Cold War, we are now China’s major market (we ran a $295 billion trade deficit with China in 2011) and China is our largest lender (China presently holds over $1 trillion in American assets—largely bonds). In a sense, we are each other’s principal sources of revenues: trade revenues for China and loans for the U.S. government. This economic interdependence is here to stay, however, it will be embedded in a competitive environment, which will make the two nations anything but close allies. Add to the testy economic relationship friction over human rights, Taiwan, and disagreements over territorial claims in the South China Sea; and you have enough additional negative karma to generate a very “cold” posture between the two great nations.

Q: The economic competition between the two has received heightened scrutiny in the past few years, in part because China ignores the environmental laws employed by most western nations, controls its currency and exerts wage controls on its workers. How will these behaviors affect the relationship with the U.S. and the West in the next few years?

A: The battle of ideologies between communism and capitalism is withering quickly with the depreciation of the communist ideology among both Chinese leaders and people.

Gallarotti Guest Speaker on Ebru Tv


Giulio Gallarotti, professor of government, speaks on the program, "Fresh Outlook."


On a March 9 episode of Ebru TV‘s “Fresh Outlook,” Giulio Gallarotti, professor of government, discussed the premise, “Has the United States, once the leader of the free world, lost its edge?”

The discussion was prompted by recent world events, especially the uprisings in the Middle East, as well as the outcome of last fall’s G-20 Summit.

Ebru TV is a Turkish-based broadcasting network with affiliates throughout the world.

Gallarotti, Nelson on China’s Rising Power

Giulio Gallarotti

Michael Nelson

On a recent episode of WNPR’s Where We Live,’ Giulio Gallarotti, professor of government, and Michael Nelson, assistant professor of government, discussed China’s rising national profile and the Western perceptions of Chinese power.

According to the WNPR broadcast, China reports a $20.8 billion trade surplus for December, $191 billion for the year and the world is cowering in fear of China’s rapid rise to power. Goldman Sachs predicts China’s and U.S. economies will be equivalent in size around 2027.

As a result, recent polls show that Americans think the U.S. is in a downward spiral and China is the new rising superpower.

At 30:10, Gallarotti says ““There’s a natural tendency for military operations to go along with economic expansion  … What you’ll find is that as China’s economic wings stretch, also its military wings will stretch … to show they have the capacity, the muscle to back up their claims and protect economic networks.”

At 44:15, Nelson says : “There’s a natural tendency for military operations to go along with economic expansion  … What you’ll find is that as China’s economic wings stretch, also its military wings will stretch … to show they have the capacity, the muscle to back up their claims and protect economic networks.”


Gallarotti’s Biography in Who’s Who in America

Giulio Gallarotti (Photo by Chion Wolf)

The biography of Giulio Gallarotti, professor of government, tutor in the College of Social Studies, is published by the Marquis editors’ Who’s Who in America 2011.

The 2011 edition contains more than 96,000 biographies of the nation’s most noteworthy people in a single, comprehensive resource. The book is a biographical reference tool for networking, prospecting, fact-checking, and numerous other research purposes.

He also appeared in the 2010 Who’s Who.

Gallarotti Publishes Power Curse, Cosmopolitan Power

Book by Giulio Gallarotti

Book by Giulio Gallarotti

Giulio Gallarotti, professor of government, tutor in the College of Social Studies, is the author of  The Power Curse: Influence and Illusion in World Politics, published by Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2010; and Cosmopolitan Power in International Relations: A Synthesis of Realism, Neoliberalism, and Constructivism, published by Cambridge University Press, 2010.