Tag Archive for international

Wesleyan Launches New International Website

Learn about internationally-focused courses, student organizations, study abroad opportunities, cultural events and much more on Wesleyan's new International website.

Learn about internationally-focused courses, student organizations, study abroad opportunities, cultural events and much more on Wesleyan’s new International website.

No matter what field of study they pursue, Wesleyan students almost inevitably find that their education provides an introduction to cultures other than their own. Whether it’s the German film, West African dance, or Latin American politics class they take; a study abroad adventure; or a new friend or classmate from another part of the world, the Wesleyan experience reaches far outside central Connecticut.

To celebrate and share the global nature of a Wesleyan education—as well as the impact of Wesleyan students, faculty and alumni in countries around the world—a new International website has just been launched. The site serves as a resource for prospective students and families who are applying to Wesleyan from outside the U.S., or domestic prospective or current students who are seeking a global education. Alumni, parents and others will also find the site of interest.

The site features stories and videos of students who come to Wesleyan from abroad; profiles of faculty members whose research interests span the globe; and information on alumni making an impact in countries around the world. There is also information on internationally-focused student organizations, classes and academic centers and programs; helpful links and FAQs for prospective international students; and a photo and video gallery of cultural events held on campus. An interactive Google map feature allows visitors to the site to actively explore Wesleyan’s impact around the world.

“This site is a very important—and impressive—introduction to all the ways Wesleyan is international! In our global economy and with the wide range of international interests, this is sure to be a resource for all prospective students, wherever they live and go to school,” said Nancy Hargrave Meislahn, dean of admission and financial aid.

International Students: Why Wesleyan?

On Aug. 25, Wesleyan welcomed 92 international students to campus – 71 foreign nationals and 21 U.S. citizens living abroad, or about 13 percent of the entire Class of 2017. Why did they choose Wesleyan? Here are a few of their answers:

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Meyer Presents Paper at Vladimir Nabokov Museum

Rachel Trousdale and Priscilla Meyer stand on the landing of the Nabokov Museum at 47 Bol'shaya Morskaya Street in St. Petersburg.

Rachel Trousdale and Priscilla Meyer stand on the landing of the Nabokov Museum at 47 Bol’shaya Morskaya Street in St. Petersburg.

Chair of the Russian Language and Literature Department Priscilla Meyer and her daughter, Rachel Trousdale, an associate professor at Agnes Scott College, co-authored a paper. The paper, “Vladimir Nabokov and Virginia Woolf,” will appear in the coming issue of Comparative Literature Studies. A Penn State Press publication, Comparative Literature Studies “publishes comparative articles in literature and culture, critical theory, and cultural and literary relations within and beyond the Western tradition.”

Vladimir Nabokov was a Russian-born novelist, most known for his book, Lolita (1955). He also founded Wellesley College’s Russian Department and was a distinguished entomologist.

In July, Meyer and Trousdale presented two sections of the paper at the “Nabokov Readings,” a conference held annually in the Nabokov Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia.

In addition, the Nabokov Society of Japan invited Meyer to speak at the Kyoto conference in November 2013. In Japan, scholars of Russian and English literature traditionally studied Nabokov’s works separately without the benefit of a common forum for discussion. The Nabokov Society of Japan organizes two scholarly conferences every year in order to allow scholars and fans of Nabokov to discuss their research and ideas.

Travel Writer, Radio Host Frommer ’88 Speaks about Wesleyan Education

In this video, travel writer, editor, and radio host Pauline Frommer ’88 talks about growing up in the travel industry, and reveals how her Wesleyan education changed her mind about her career. Frommer majored in intellectual history at Wesleyan. “I thought I was going to be a theater major, and then I started taking a lot of history and philosophy classes and they blew my mind.” Watch this video and many more on the Video @ Wesleyan website.

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Morgan ’14 Starting Thesis on Zombies in Haitian Literature, U.S. Movies

Anya Morgan '14 demonstrates one of her favorite yoga poses at Memorial Chapel. Morgan is majoring in English and French, and works as a writing tutor, yoga instructor, and a non-directive listening service on campus.

Anya Morgan ’14 demonstrates one of her favorite yoga poses at Memorial Chapel. Morgan is majoring in English and French, and works as a writing tutor, yoga instructor, and a non-directive listening service on campus.

Anya Morgan is a member of the Class of 2014.

Q: Anya, happy senior year to you! What are you majoring in, and why did you decide on these majors?

A: Thank you! I’m majoring in English and French. I think I always knew I was going to be an English major, since my mom is an English teacher and raised me on books – it’s in my blood. I’ve also got some serious French Canadian roots on both sides of my family, so I’m able to practice speaking French with my grandparents. I guess both majors were predetermined!

Q: Where are you from and what attracted you to Wesleyan?

A: I’m from Los Angeles, and I went to an all-girls high school called Archer. Archer is tiny, but for some reason it’s kind of a feeder school for Wesleyan – out of my graduating class of about 80 girls, five are now at Wes. So, I had heard of it because of that, but what really won me over was when I visited the campus. I was deciding between Wesleyan and Cornell, so my mom and I went and visited both of them, and I was struck by the difference in the students’ attitudes. When I came to Wes everyone looked so excited to be there, my tour guide was this hippy-dippy girl wearing birkenstocks, and someone actually chased after the tour yelling “Come to Wes!” So, it was an obvious choice. The vibe is just great here.

Q: What classes are you taking this fall? Which ones are you most looking forward to taking?

A: This fall I’m going to be starting work on my thesis, so I’ll be taking fewer classes than usual. As of now, I’m going to be taking “Literatures of Lying” (English/Psych), “Paris, 19th Century” (French), and “The Empire Writes Back” (English). I might slip a swimming for fitness class in there somewhere. I’m most excited for “Literatures of Lying” because I’ve heard both the professors are wonderful but I haven’t yet taken any classes with them – it’s co-taught by the beloved Jill Morawski and Lisa Cohen.

Q: What is the topic of your thesis?

A: My thesis, which I’m also really excited for, is going to be about representations of zombies in Haitian literature as compared to representations of zombies in American horror movies. I’ve been studying the francophone islands of the West Indies for two semesters and have always had a fascination with American zombies, so I decided to marry the two ideas.

92 International Students Welcomed to Wesleyan

On Aug. 25, Wesleyan welcomed 92 international students to campus. Of these, 71 are foreign nationals and 21 are U.S. citizens living abroad. International students represent about 13 percent of the entire Class of 2017.

Students come from more than 50 countries around the world including Portugal, Macedonia, Singapore, Jamaica, Bosnia, Brazil, Germany, Ireland, Argentina, Spain, Kenya, Zimbabwe, Thailand, Nepal, Iran, Kuwait, Mongolia and others.

International Student Orientation began Aug. 25 when orientation leaders helped move the new students into their residence halls.

International students received a campus tour, a welcome dinner, shopping trips and multiple educational programs sessions that address health and medical insurance issues, programs about cultural adaptation, weather adjustment and the value of a liberal arts education. Students also attended informational sessions about U.S. systems. ISO is held prior to new student orientation in order for international students to recover from travel, often from across the globe. This program prepares international students to successfully transition to New Student Orientation, which began on Aug. 28 for the entire Class of 2017.

Photos of the students are below:

International Student Orientation, Aug. 28, 2013. (Photo by Olivia Drake)

Wolfe ’68 Translates Ancient Greek Epitaphs

Michael Wolfe '68

Michael Wolfe ’68

In his new collection Cut These Words into My Stone: Ancient Greek Epitaphs (Johns Hopkins University Press), Michael Wolfe ’68 brings together his English translations of ancient Greek epitaphs, with a foreword by Richard Martin, a classics professor at Stanford University. Greek epitaphs, considered by some scholars to be the earliest artful writing in Western Europe, are short celebrations of the lives of a rich cross section of society that help form a vivid portrait of an ancient era.

Book by Michael Wolfe '68

Book by Michael Wolfe ’68

Wolfe divides his book into five chronological sections spanning 1,000 years, beginning with the Late Archaic and Classical periods and ending with Late Antiquity. The book also features contextual comments, notes, biographies of the poets, and a bibliography. General readers should find this well-researched scholarly endeavor accessible and entertaining, as it covers a wide variety of individuals and even some animals.

At Wesleyan, Wolfe studied classics, graduating Phi Beta Kappa. While writing this book, Wolfe drew on several deep Wesleyan ties: Andy Gaus ’68, Wolfe’s classmate and friend of many years, helped review and improve many of the translations; poet Richard Wilbur, with whom Wolfe studied, wrote a comment included on the back cover of the book; and Kevin Whitfield, Wolfe’s professor of Greek, is thanked in the dedication.

Wolfe is a poet, author, and film producer who has taught writing and literature at Phillips Exeter Academy and the University of California, as well as other secondary schools and universities. An occasional speaker on Islamic issues, he and his works have received many awards.

Author website

CFA Sponsors Steel Symphony, Gallim Dance Performances

Performances never cease, even during the summer, at Wesleyan's Center for the Arts. On July 2, students, staff, faculty and community members danced to the island rhythms of the Hartford Steel Symphony in Memorial Chapel.

Performances never cease, even during the summer, at Wesleyan’s Center for the Arts. On July 2, students, staff, faculty and community members danced to the island rhythms of the Hartford Steel Symphony in Memorial Chapel.

Founded in 1989, this premier Connecticut steel pan group performed calypso, reggae, pop, classical, and jazz tunes.

Founded in 1989, this premier Connecticut steel pan group performed calypso, reggae, pop, classical, and jazz tunes.

On July 11 and 12, Gallim Dance returned to the CFA Theater to perform the New England premiere of Mama Call (2011), and Pupil Suite (2010).

On July 11 and 12, Gallim Dance returned to the CFA Theater to perform the New England premiere of Mama Call (2011), and Pupil Suite (2010).

Mama Call investigates how those who have been displaced rescue the idea of "home." Pupil Suite is reformed to the contagious music of Israeli band Balkan Beat Box, the dance is a joyous romp that plays with the madness of imagination and the ecstasy of movement.

Mama Call investigates how those who have been displaced rescue the idea of “home.” Pupil Suite is performed to the contagious music of Israeli band Balkan Beat Box, the dance is a joyous romp that plays with the madness of imagination and the ecstasy of movement.

To view up-and-coming CFA events visit this link. (Photos by Eki Ramadhan ’16)

Zheng: “Wherever There Are Africans, There Is Good Music”

Su Zheng, associate professor of music, associate professor of East Asian studies, spoke in a recent China Daily USA article about the number of African musical artists in China and how their presence is “creating new types of harmony between the two lands.”

Zheng starts off by pointing out that “Wherever there are Africans, there is good music – just like wherever there are Chinese, there is good food.”

When she discovered that there were no reports on the presence of African music in China, she decided to research the music of the African diaspora herself. The research completed by Zheng and her team of three graduate students from the Shanghai Conservatory of Music shows, while it seems improbable, that African music will greatly influence Chinese music at some point.

Krishnan Nominated for Dance Performance Award

Hari Krishnan

Hari Krishnan

Assistant Professor of Dance Hari Krishnan has been nominated for the Bessie Award for Outstanding Performer for his solo performance of “The Frog Princess,” which he performed as part of the La Mama Moves! Dance Festival in New York City in June and July.

Forty nominees for the 2012-13 Bessies, formally known as The New York Dance and Performance Awards, were announced at a press conference at the Gina Gibney Dance Center in New York on July 17. The 29th Annual Bessie Awards will be held on Oct. 7 at the Apollo Theater in New York.
Krishnan was one of 12 artists nominated for Outstanding Performer. See the full list here. Read a New York Times review of Krishnan’s performance, which he choreographed, here.