Tag Archive for Psychology Department

Blakemore ’65 Speaks on Psychologies of Global Warming

Bill Blakemore '65, an ABC News Correspondent, will speak on "The Many Psychologies of Global Warming," during a talk at 8 p.m. Nov. 3 in Memorial Chapel.

Bill Blakemore '65, an ABC News Correspondent, will speak on "The Many Psychologies of Global Warming," during a talk at 8 p.m. Nov. 3 in Memorial Chapel.

Four weeks before the nations meet in Copenhagen to try to avert the catastrophes that global warming may bring, ABC News Correspondent William Blakemore ’65 will identify many surprising psychological factors at play as people in all walks of life deal with the latest “hard news” on climate.

Blakemore will speak on “The Many Psychologies of Global Warming,” during a talk at 8 p.m. Nov. 3 in Memorial Chapel.

He’ll explore new definitions of sanity that may pertain, and give examples displaying different “psychologies, as well as manmade global warming’s place in “the long history of narcissistic insults to humanity itself.”

Two new time-line graphs of rapid and dangerous climate change will give fresh global context to the psychological challenges and experiences he has observed in the five years since he began focusing on global warming for ABC News.

Computer modelers trying to project the speed and severity of global warming’s advance often say that “the biggest unknown” in their equations is not data about ice or atmosphere, carbon or clouds, but “what the humans will do.” This talk probes that field and many states of mind already engaged.

The talk is sponsored by the Wasch Center for Retired Faculty, Department of Psychology, and the Robert Schumann Lecture Series in the Environmental Studies Program.

A follow-up discussion will be held at 4 p.m. Nov. 4 in the Wasch Center on Lawn Ave.

Sanislow Awarded NIH Grant for Psychopathology Research

Charles Sanislow, assistant professor of psychology, received a $349,939 grant from the National Institute of Health for his research titled “Cognitive Control in Borderline & Trauma Psychopathology.” The grant, awarded Aug. 24, will be applied over two years. It is a continuation of a six-year grant transferred from Yale University.

Barth, Bhandari ’08, MA ’09 Co-Author Article on Children’s Social Cognition

Keera Bhandari ’08, MA ’09 and Hilary Barth, assistant professor of psychology, are the authors of a new article on children’s social cognition. The article, based on Bhandari’s research project for her master’s degree in psychology, is titled “Show or tell: Testimony is sufficient to induce the curse of knowledge in three- and four-year-olds.” It will appear in the Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology in 2009.

NSF Grant Lets Shusterman Study Connections Between Children’s Acquisition of Language, Number Concepts

Anna Shusterman

Anna Shusterman, assistant professor of psychology, received a five-year National Science Foundation grant.

Anna Shusterman, assistant professor of psychology, recently received a five-year, $716,227 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to study “The role of language in children’s acquisition of number concepts.” Shusterman will be evaluating 3-to-5-year-old hearing children in her Cognitive Development Laboratory at Wesleyan. She also will be studying deaf and hard-of-hearing children of the same ages who are learning English to try to determine how language delays affect children’s learning of number concepts.

The grant, which begins this year, comes from the National Science Foundation’s Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) program. The program is only available to non-tenured faculty. Researchers may apply a total of three times to the program; Shusterman was awarded the grant on her first application.

“The CAREER Program truly provides NSF’s most prestigious awards in support of junior faculty and demonstrates

Dierker, Rose Receive NIH Grant for Smoking Study

Lisa Dierker, associate professor of psychology, and Jennifer Rose, research associate professor of psychology, received a grant worth $521,938 from the National Institute of Health/National Institute on Drug Abuse on May 14. The grant was issued under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.

Dierker and Rose are researching “Individual Differences in Smoking Exposure and Nicotine Dependence Sensitivity.” The grant will be applied over two years.

Shusterman Receives NSF Grant for Child Development Study

Anna Shusterman, assistant professor of psychology, received a grant worth $716,227 from the National Science Foundation’s Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) program on June 1. Shusterman’s project is titled “The role of language in children’s acquisition of number concepts.” The grant will be applied over five years.

$700,000 NSF Grant Will Transform Plous’ Website

More than 1,500 people are members of the Psychology Social Network, managed by Scott Plous.

Approximately 2,000 scholars are members of the Psychology Social Network, founded by Scott Plous. The National Science Foundation recently awarded Plous a $700,000 grant to transform the site into a full featured social networking service.

Before the internationally-known social network site Facebook existed, there was Social Psychology Network (SPN), founded at Wesleyan in 1996 by professor of psychology Scott Plous. Three years after launching his site, Plous received a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to enhance SPN. Now NSF is providing a new $700,000 grant to help Plous transform the site into a full featured social networking service for visitors and its approximately 2,000 members across the world.

The primary users of SPN are researchers, educators, students, and others interested in psychology. According to the site’s usage page, more than 10,000 people from over 100 countries visit the Social Psychology Network in a typical 24-hour period. All told, SPN’s pages have been visited more than 160 million times over the past decade.

The SPN features professional profiles of some of its members.

SPN features professional profiles of some of its members.

The new NSF grant provides support for Plous to hire a social networking specialist to add more Web 2.0 functionality. Currently, the site is operated by a small team consisting of Plous, executive director; David Jensenius, system administrator; Mike Lestik, web designer; Jen Spiller, senior web editor; R.J. Herrick, web programmer; and a few student assistants.

Plous says that the grant will allow SPN to bring the latest web-based networking technologies to the social psychology community. When this work is completed, users will be able to link their profiles to “colleagues” (similar to “friends” in Facebook) and establish mini-networks based on shared research interests, career level, geographic location or other attributes. Users will also be able to track each other’s publications, subscribe to profiles, and be notified of new content.

Social Psychology Network now includes a Google "mash-up" in which the global network of SPN profiles can be searched geographically.

Social Psychology Network now includes a Google "mash-up" in which the global network of SPN profiles can be searched geographically.

These features build on interactive and subscription-based services that Social Psychology Network has already developed. For example, SPN offers RSS feeds, Twitter updates, and a Google “mash-up” in which the global network of SPN profiles can be searched geographically. The Network’s searchable directory also includes nearly 700 Media Contacts willing to talk with reporters about behavioral science topics, and over 450 SPN Mentors offering free career assistance to students from underrepresented groups.

“Scott Plous’ continued success at securing significant financial support is a strong endorsement of his efforts to support the global dissemination of knowledge and facilitate communication among scholars worldwide,” says Ruth Striegel-Moore, professor and chair of psychology.

“Credit is also due to Information Technology Services and the Administration for their early support in the development of Social Psychology Network. And, of course, SPN thrives thanks to Plous’ vision, creativity, and boundless energy,” Striegel-Moore says.

Plous Awarded NSF Grant for Psychology Network

Scott Plous, professor of psychology.

Scott Plous, professor of psychology.

Scott Plous, professor of psychology, received a $700,000 grant from the National Science Foundation for the Social Psychology Network. Plous founded the web-based presence in 1996.

The grant will be used to transform the site into a full featured social networking service for visitors and its approximately 2,000 members across the world. For more information read the accompanying article in The Wesleyan Connection.

Barth Authors Article on Children’s Mathematical Thinking

Hilary Barth, assistant professor of psychology, assistant professor of neuroscience and behavior, is the lead author of a new article on the intuitive foundations of children’s mathematical thinking. The article, co-authored with collaborators at Harvard University, is titled “Children’s multiplicative transformations of discrete and continuous quantities.” It will appear in the Journal of Experimental Child Psychology in 2009, in a special issue devoted to the typical development of numerical cognition.

Natural Sciences and Mathematics Hosts Poster Session

Jan Naegele, chair and professor of biology, professor of neuroscience and behavior, and Wesleyan President Michael Roth listen to Kai Xuan Keith Tan explain his research during the Natural Science and Mathematics Poster Session April 17. Tan's project was titled "The Role of Ku70 in Regulating Cell Death during Cerebral Cortical Development."

Janice Naegele, chair and professor of biology, professor of neuroscience and behavior, and Wesleyan President Michael S. Roth listen to Kai Xuan Keith Tan '09 explain his research during the Natural Science and Mathematics Poster Session April 17. Tan's project was titled "The Role of Ku70 in Regulating Cell Death during Cerebral Cortical Development."

Preschoolers' Use of Testimony."

Psychology graduate student Keera Bhandari explains her research on "Acquiring Knowledge from Others: Preschoolers' Use of Testimony."

Shuk Kei Cheng '09 talks to David Bodznick, dean of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, professor of biology, professor of neuroscience and behavior, about her project titled "Anodic Oxidative Functionalization of Tolune Derivatives."

Shuk Kei Cheng '09 talks to David Bodznick, dean of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, professor of biology, professor of neuroscience and behavior, about her project titled "Anodic Oxidative Functionalization of Tolune Derivatives."

Finding Intermediate Mass Black Holes in the Local Universe," with Laurel Appel, director of the Wesleyan McNair Program, adjunct associate professor of biology, senior research associate.

Hannah Sugarman '09 discusses her research on "Baby Giants: Finding Intermediate Mass Black Holes in the Local Universe," with Laurel Appel, director of the Wesleyan McNair Program, adjunct associate professor of biology, senior research associate.

Physics major Anand Swaminathan '09 explains his research on "Vortex Dissipation in Superfluid Third Sound Flows."

Physics major Anand Swaminathan '09 explains his research on "Vortex Dissipation in Superfluid Third Sound Flows."

Molecular biology and biochemistry major Muna Nahar '09 researched gene regulation.

Molecular biology and biochemistry major Muna Nahar '09 talks about her research on gene regulation.

What is the Releationship?"

Psychology major Sarah Jeffrey '09 presented her findings on "Elementary Neurocognition, Learning Potential, and Function Life Skills: What is the Relationship?" (Photos by Olivia Bartlett)

Child Behavior, Minority Reinforcement at Psychology Poster Session

Sarah Edelman ’09 explains her research to Scott Plous, professor of psychology, during the Department of Psychology Research Poster Presentation April 23 in Judd Hall. Edelman’s study, "The Relative Contributions of Physical Attractiveness and Prosocial Behavior in Preschool Friendship Choices" explores how children ages 3 and 4 chose friends in school and internalize gender schemas early on.

Sarah Edelman ’09 explains her research to Scott Plous, professor of psychology, during the Department of Psychology Research Poster Presentation April 23 in Judd Hall. Edelman’s study, "The Relative Contributions of Physical Attractiveness and Prosocial Behavior in Preschool Friendship Choices" explores how children ages 3 and 4 chose friends in school and internalize gender schemas early on.

Mothering Styles and Object Learning in Germany, Greece and Italy,”  Schug and her collaborators observed 77 mother-infant dyads in play for five minute periods, differentiating between independent or interdependent maternal style.

Post Doc Mariah Schug explains her research to Ruth Striegel-Moore, the Walter A. Crowell University Professor of the Social Sciences, professor and chair of psychology. In "Mother-Infant Interactions in a Cross-Cultural Sample: Mothering Styles and Object Learning in Germany, Greece and Italy,” Schug and her collaborators observed 77 mother-infant dyads in play for five minute periods, differentiating between independent or interdependent maternal style.

The Role of Hyphenation in Three-Word Expressions.” Her study explores how we process meaning from three word phrases like “last-minute shopping,” with and without hyphenation.

At right, Joe Bruno, professor of chemistry and vice president for academic affairs and provost, comments on Kacey Wochna's '10 research titled "Three-Word or Three Word: The Role of Hyphenation in Three-Word Expressions.” Her study explores how we process meaning from three word phrases like “last-minute shopping,” with and without hyphenation.

Arielle Tolman '10, pictured, and Juliana Neuspiel ‘09 researched "Differential Predictors of Everyday Skills and Satisfaction with Life in Patients with Schizophrenia.” The students worked with 49 stabilized outpatients with schizophrenia.

Arielle Tolman '10, pictured, and Juliana Neuspiel ‘09, researched "Differential Predictors of Everyday Skills and Satisfaction with Life in Patients with Schizophrenia.” The students worked with 49 stabilized outpatients who have been diagnosed with schizophrenia.

David Baranger '09 talks about his research titled "Does Learning Potential Predict Rehabilitation Outcome in Schizophrenia" to Barbara Juhasz, assistant professor of psychology.

David Baranger '10 talks about his research titled "Does Learning Potential Predict Rehabilitation Outcome in Schizophrenia" to Barbara Juhasz, assistant professor of psychology.

Similar Physical Appearance/Different Social Perception, Manipulation of Self-efficacy.” His study questions the effectiveness of Wesleyan tutoring programs in which minority students of high socioeconomic status tutor middle-school students with low socioeconomic status.

BA/MA student Jermain Lewis '09 presented his research on "Minority Reinforcement: Similar Physical Appearance/Different Social Perception, Manipulation of Self-efficacy.” His study questions the effectiveness of Wesleyan tutoring programs in which minority students of high socioeconomic status tutor middle-school students with low socioeconomic status.

Preschoolers’ Use of Testimony” which explores how preschool-age children learn to trust or distrust what others tell them. (Photos by Olivia Bartlett)

Graduate student Keera Bhandari, talks to John Seamon, professor of psychology, professor of neuroscience and behavior, about her study “Acquiring Knowledge from Others: Preschoolers’ Use of Testimony” which explores how preschool-age children learn to trust or distrust what others tell them. (Photos by Olivia Bartlett)