Tag Archive for History and Theory

Kleinberg Lectures in France, Elected to Historiography Commission

His fields of expertise are the intellectual history of Europe in the twentieth century, the history of contemporary French philosophy and the theory of history.

Ethan Kleinberg speaks at Bordeaux Montaigne University’s Doctoral School.

On March 27, Professor Ethan Kleinberg, director of the Center for the Humanities, presented a lecture to the École Doctorale on “The Specters of the Past,” as a distinguished visiting professor at University of Bordeaux Montaigne in Pessac, France.

Kleinberg also is professor of history, professor of letters, and editor-in-chief of History and Theory. He is an expert on the intellectual history of Europe in the 20th century, the history of philosophy, as well as the philosophy and theory of history.

Kleinberg’s lecture focused on the theme of his latest book, Haunting History: for a deconstructive approach to the past (Stanford U Press) which advocates for a deconstructive approach to the practice of history at a moment when available forms for writing and publishing about the past are undergoing a radical transformation.

He criticizes the persistence of what he calls “ontological realism” as the dominant mode of thought among historians, and studies the ways in which this realistic way of thinking is reinforced by some current publishing practices.

Kleinberg was recently nominated and elected to the Advisory Board of the International Commission for the History and Theory of Historiography, the leading international organization for the philosophy and theory of history.

History Faculty Participate in American Historical Association Meeting

Screen shot 2015-01-06 at 12.52.34 PMFour faculty from the History Department participated in the American Historical Association Meeting in New York City Jan. 2-5. The topic was “History and Other Disciplines.”

Professor of History Ethan Kleinberg presented “Just the Facts: The Fantasy of a Historical Science.” Kleinberg also is the director of the Center for the Humanities, professor of letters and executive editor of History and Theory.

Assistant Professor of History Victoria Smolkin-Rothrock spoke on “From a Society Free of Religion to Freedom of Conscience: How Toleration Emerged from within Totalitarianism.” She also is assistant professor of Russian, Eastern European and Eurasian studies and tutor in the College of Social Studies.

Professor of History Magda Teter spoke on roundtable panel on “Jewish History/General History: Rethinking the Divide.” Teter also is the Jeremy Zwelling Professor of Jewish Studies, professor of medieval studies and chair of the History Department.

Associate Professor of History Jennifer Tucker was a commentator on a panel titled “The Photographic Event,” which reexamined the question of an “event” by looking at various visual technologies and texts, whether sketches, paintings or films. Tucker also is associate professor of environmental studies, associate professor of feminist, gender and sexuality studies, associate professor of science in society and a faculty fellow in the College of the Environment.

History and Theory Journal Gains Popularity in Sweden

History and Theory.

History and Theory.

The National Library of Sweden has announced that the Wesleyan-published (in affiliation with Wiley-Blackwell Publishing) History and Theory: Studies in the Philosophy of History is its 10th most popular foreign e-journal.

History and Theory publishes articles, review essays and summaries of books in the areas of critical philosophy of history, speculative philosophy of history, historiography, history of historiography, historical methodology, critical theory, time and culture, and history and related disciplines. The electronic form to all who subscribe to the print edition.

The editors include Ethan Kleinberg, Julia Perkins, Philip Pomper and Gary Shaw.

Distinguished Scholars from China Discuss “Comparative Enlightenments” at Wesleyan

Distinguished scholars from China discussed "Comparative Enlightenments" with Wesleyan faculty during a forum May 9-11 at the Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies.

Distinguished scholars from China discussed “Comparative Enlightenments” with Wesleyan faculty and other guests during a forum May 9-11 at the Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies.

(Story contributed by Charles Salas, director of strategic initiatives)

“A golden example of what exchange should be between academic communities in the United States and China.” That’s how Gao Xiang, vice secretary of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS) and editor-in-chief of the Social Sciences in China Press, described the Chinese-American Scholarly Exchange Forum that took place May 9-11 at Wesleyan’s Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies. The forum brought 15 distinguished scholars from China to Wesleyan to meet with American counterparts to discuss the topic of “Comparative Enlightenments.”

The forum was framed by Wang Weiguang, president of CASS, who expressed fervent hopes for this dialogue “between Eastern and Western civilizations as if a lamp is lit by another lamp, as if a dream illuminates another dream, and ultimately illuminates our entire human world.” CASS is far and away the most important center in China for studies in philosophy and the social sciences, and this is the second forum in which they’ve partnered with Wesleyan. The topic of the first forum (held a year and a half ago in Bejing) was “Tradition.”

Animal Studies, Theatrical Postmodernism, Lenin Topics of “In Theory” Lecture Series

All students, staff and faculty are invited to the Spring 2013 “In Theory” lecture series presented by the Certificate Program in Social, Cultural and Critical Theory. Each week, Wesleyan faculty will lead a discussion on social, cultural and critical theory or on a well-known theorist.

Lectures take place in Downey House 113 from 4:15 to 5:30 p.m.

Matthew Garrett, assistant professor of English, will speak on V.I. Lenin.

Matthew Garrett, assistant professor of English, will speak on V.I. Lenin.

On March 26, Matthew Garrett, assistant professor of English, will speak on V.I. Lenin, founder of the Russian Communist Party and leader of the Bolshevik Revolution. Lenin’s political theories, derived from interpretations of Marxism, revolved around the establishment of a vanguard party to lead the revolution of the working class.

On April 3, Demetrius Eudell, professor of history and African American studies, will give a lecture on “Introducing Aimé Césaire.” Césaire, a French poet and author, was a founder of the Négritude movement, which sought to reject French colonial racism and intellectual and political domination through the establishment of a common black identity. Césaire saw Négritude as the acceptance of being black as well as the recognition of the colonial experience of people of color.

On April 10, Sean McCann, chair of the English department, will give the lecture “Introducing Lionel Trilling and the New York Intellectuals.” Trilling, author of The Liberal Imagination, was a 20th century American writer and literary critic who discussed works along the lines of the “moral imagination,” questioning how we live our lives, the roles of culture and biology, and the nature of good and evil.

Brian Fay Edits Wesleyan-Owned History, Theory Journal

 Brian Fay, the William Griffin Professor of Philosophy and tutor in the College of Social Studies, is the executive editor of the journal <i>History and Theory</i>. The publication is owned by Wesleyan and edited by faculty.

Brian Fay, the William Griffin Professor of Philosophy and tutor in the College of Social Studies, is the executive editor of the journal History and Theory. The publication is owned by Wesleyan and edited by faculty.

Q: Brian, in addition to being the William Griffin Professor of Philosophy and tutor in the College of Social Studies, you are the executive editor of the journal History and Theory. What is the purpose of the publication?

A: The purpose of the journal is to publish the best current thinking about the theory and philosophy of history. We also maintain a discussion network that provides a site for members to communicate about matters relevant to our subject area. Lastly, we seek to enhance the intellectual life at Wesleyan