Olivia Drake

Administrative Departments Encouraged to Apply for a Green Office Certification

Antonio Farias, vice president for equity and inclusion, and Megan Flagg, executive assistant to the provost and vice president for academic affairs, proudly display their Green Office Certification on the third floor of North College. The third floor is the first space on campus to be Green Office Certified by the Sustainability Office.

Antonio Farias, vice president for equity and inclusion, and Megan Flagg, executive assistant to the provost and vice president for academic affairs, proudly display their Green Office Certification on the third floor of North College. The third floor is the first space on campus to be Green Office Certified by the Sustainability Office. “The process was quite easy,” said Flagg, who served as the office coordinator. “Since Wesleyan is so focused on sustainability, we were already doing many of the green office checklist items. The brief checklist was quick and easy to fill out. Now we’re exploring what we can change to see if we can get to the next level of certification.”

This year Wesleyan will reward administrative offices that go green.

The new Green Office Certification Program, overseen by the Sustainability Office, is designed to recognize, support, and promote offices that engage in environmentally sustainable practices. All administrative and academic offices are eligible to become certified.

To get started, a department needs to elect an office coordinator who will fill out the Green Office Certification form, coordinate office participation, and review completed checklists with the Sustainability Office.

The coordinator will distribute individual checklists to all employees in the office or within a defined space.

If at least 75 percent of the office has completed the checklist, the office may receive an award. Certificates will be issued and offices are encouraged to hang their plaque in a location visible to office visitors. Certifications are valid for three years from the date awarded and come in bronze, silver, and gold levels.

“The Green Office Certification Program encourages employees to be environmentally conscious while at work,” explained Jen Kleindienst, sustainability director. “To be certified, departments may need to make small changes in their work environment, for example, share a communal garbage bin, forgo individual refrigerators, or be willing to turn down the thermostat while away from the office. There’s little things that can make a huge difference.”

To date, the third floor of North College (consisting of the Offices of Academic Affairs; Institutional Research; Corporate, Foundation and Government Grants; and Equity and Inclusion) is the only academic space to be Green Office Certified. Although they are proud to boast their silver-level award, they’re not stopping until they reach the gold.

“We are now trying to work up from our silver certification to gold certification,” explained third-floor office resident Joyce Jacobsen, provost and vice president for academic affairs. “As part of our additional efforts to improve our certification level, we’ve replaced most fluorescent lights with energy-efficient LED lights; replaced disposable coffee stirrers with reusable metal stirrers; encouraged everyone to use mugs off of our mug tree instead of disposable cups; and switched to a sugar shaker instead of using individual sugar packets. We’ve also replaced our powered shredder with hand-cranked shredders and use a recycling shredder service for big jobs.”

For these extra efforts, the Sustainability Office will offer bonus points toward their certification.

The Sustainability Office and Wesleyan’s Green Team offer many tips for creating a more eco-friendly office environment. For additional information, contact the Sustainability Office.

Turenne Honored by Middlesex United Way for Leading Successful Employee Campaign

Paul Turenne

Paul Turenne

Paul Turenne, systems analyst for Information Technology Services, received a Coordinator of the Year Award during the Middlesex United Way Campaign Awards Breakfast on May 8.

Turenne served as Wesleyan’s 2017–18 United Way Employee Campaign campus coordinator. He helped the University post the highest numbers—both in participation and in amount pledged—since 2012. More than 400 Wesleyan employees, retired faculty, and authorized vendors (including 38 “Leadership Givers” pledging $1,000 or more) participated. Together they donated a total of $122,150 in support of United Way programs in Middlesex County and throughout the state.

To date, the employee campaign has raised approximately $1.9 million for the United Way.

 

Dynamic Women at Wesleyan Hosts Meditation, Discussion on Self-Confidence, Inner Wisdom

On Feb. 13, Wesleyan's Dynamic Women@Wes organization hosted a workshop on "Living a Soul-filled Life by Strengthening Self-Love." Inspirational speaker Mensimah Shabazz led a meditation and discussed that focused on creative ways of generating self-confidence, fearlessness and inner wisdom. Shabazz is the president of AGAPE Consulting, which focuses on energy healing and psychospirituality.

On Feb. 13, Wesleyan’s Dynamic Women at Wesleyan (Women@Wes) organization hosted a workshop on “Living a Soul-Filled Life by Strengthening Self-Love.” Inspirational speaker Mensimah Shabazz led a meditation and discussion that focused on creative ways of generating self-confidence, fearlessness, and inner wisdom. “One of the ways is strengthening self-love, which enables a person to recognize their uniqueness, beauty, and strength,” she said.

Women at Wesleyan frequently meets to actively engage faculty and staff in education, networking, and mentoring processes leading to enhanced awareness, empowerment, and transformation of women.

For more information visit http://womenatwes.site.wesleyan.edu/.

 

Students Celebrate Spring, South Asian Culture at Holi Festival

The Asian American Student Collective (AASC) and Shakti, the South Asian Student Association, hosted the annual Holi (Festival of Colors) celebration April 28 on Foss Hill. Students tossed colored powder at each other, celebrating the spring season.

The event served as the culmination of a month-long celebration of Asian-American culture, identity, history, and activism.

(Photos and video by Melissa Rocha)


Honors, MA Students Share Research at Science Theses Celebration

Honors and MA students from the Natural Sciences and Mathematics Division participated in the Celebration of Science Theses, April 27 in Exley Science Center. Students shared their work with the broader Wesleyan community.

Honors and MA students from the Natural Sciences and Mathematics Division participated in the Celebration of Science Theses, April 27 in Exley Science Center. Students shared their work with the broader Wesleyan community.

Darci Collins presented her research titled "Lord Kelvin's Error? An Investigation into the Isotropic Helocoid." Collins' advisor is Greg Voth.

Darci Collins ’18 presented her research titled “Lord Kelvin’s Error? An Investigation into the Isotropic Helocoid.” Collins’s advisor is Greg Voth, chair and professor of physics.

Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Supports ICPP’s Performing Artist Case Studies

Wesleyan’s Institute for Curatorial Practice in Performance (ICPP) has been awarded a two-year, $200,000 grant from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation.

Introduced as a pilot initiative in 2011, the ICPP is the first institute of its kind, a center for the academic study of the presentation and contextualization of contemporary performance. The low-residency program offers students a master’s degree in innovative and relevant curatorial approaches to developing and presenting time-based art.

The grant will be used to support performing artist case studies, working with artists at critical points in their careers to provide analysis of their entrepreneurial strategies, as well as engagement with the economic drivers of cultural production. This funding will further ICPP’s efforts to bring to light different models for artist development, and highlight successful tactics for philanthropic support over the arc of their career. Findings developed during the case studies, including best practices and replicable models, will be shared via a website and print publication, as well as at various conferences.

“As older infrastructure for arts support erodes, performing artists are developing inventive new models for sustaining a career,” said Sarah Curran, managing director of ICPP. “These case studies will allow us to work with artists to both assess and suggest new entrepreneurial strategies, and create and share models of best practice. Our hope is that this process will spark dialogue not only with artists and curators involved in the studies, but also with arts organizations, cultural policy makers, and grant makers about how best to support artists in this shifting arts economy.”

“The continued support of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation recognizes the impact that the Institute for Curatorial Practice in Performance has beyond the Wesleyan campus,” said President Michael Roth. “These case studies will provide a new assessment of best practices and inventive strategies for the arts.”

Author André Aciman Delivers Annual Sonnenblick Lecture

On April 25, Wesleyan welcomed award-winning writer and scholar Andre Aciman to campus to deliver the 2018 Annie Sonnenblick lecture.

On April 25, Wesleyan welcomed award-winning writer and scholar André Aciman to campus to deliver the 2018 Annie Sonnenblick lecture.

Aciman is an American essayist and New York Times best-selling novelist originally from Alexandria, Egypt. He is the author of four novels—Call Me by Your Name, Eight White Nights, Harvard Square, and Enigma Variations—as well as nonfiction works including Out of Egypt: A Memoir, False Papers, and Alibis. He is also the co-author and editor of Letters of Transit and The Proust Project. He signed copies of his books during the event.

Students Share Research at Psychology Poster Session

Thesis students and research students presented their research on April 26 during the Psychology Research Poster Presentations in Beckham Hall. More than 80 students presented 69 posters at the event. (Photos by Olivia Drake)

Thesis students and research students presented their research on April 26 during the Psychology Research Poster Presentations in Beckham Hall. One-hundred-and-ten students presented 69 posters at the event. (Photos by Olivia Drake)

Audrey Konow ’20, Jhanelle Thomas ’18, and Gabrielle Vargas ’18 presented “’Do You Fear Being Without Your Smartphone?’ Implications for Sleep and Mental Health among Emerging Adults at University.” Their advisor is Royette Tavernier.

Mixed-Race, Interfaith Identities Explored through Performative Conversations

Middletown-based ARTFARM artistic director Marcella Trowbridge, center, works with Lola Makombo ’20 on crafting a performative conversation based on interviews with a family member.

Students in the Mixed in America: Race, Religion, and Memoir course explored mixed-race identities not only through reading, writing, and classroom discussion, but through performative art.

Matt Kleppner ’18 created a short performance based on an interview with his uncle.

Throughout the semester, students used the genre of the memoir as a focusing lens to look at ways that Americans of mixed heritage have found a place, crafted an identity, and made meaning out of being considered “mixed.”

The course is part of Wesleyan’s Creative Campus Initiative, which pairs non-arts faculty with artists for collaborative teaching and research. Professor Liza McAlister teamed up with the local professional theater organization ARTFARM to offer students a module of four classes under the instruction of artistic director Marcella Trowbridge.

In the students’ exploration of memoir, Trowbridge asked them to interview a family member and craft a short performative piece based on their interviews–or–their responses to their interviews.

“We spoke about ‘brass tack’ strategies for interviewing and documentation, but then left the linear procedural work for a process-based inquiry,” Trowbridge explained.

The class collaboratively brainstormed and worked physically with mark-making, personal items, architecture, kinesthetic response, and the use of space. Students also learned about using text, gestures, movement, sound, repetition, and props in a performance.

On April 18 and 19, the students shared their compositions with their classmates.

CAAS, Second Shades Present Student-Written, Directed Play

On April 19, 20, and 21, the Center for African American Studies and Second Shades student organization presented the play La Violecion of My PapiYon (Papiyon means butterfly in Haitian Creole) in the Patricelli ’92 Theater. The play was written by Arline Pierre-Louis ’19 and directed by Ruby Fludzinski ’20 and Ray Achan ’19. The production was put together by a cast and crew of over 50 people who all identify as people of color.

Set in the beautiful town of Jacmel, Haiti, during the post-Duvalier era (1988), Gylda (played by Inayah Bashir ’20 and pictured below in the purple and white dress) is a hardworking housewife by day and lucid dreamer by night. She divides her time among the three most important areas of her life—motherhood, marriage, and friendship—but struggles at finding time for herself as a woman. This all changes when Gylda experiences a growing spiritual awakening.

Photos of the performance are below: (Photos by Jonas Powell ’18)

Paterson’s Senior Thesis Explores Urban Farming, Communal Activity, Performance

Theater and earth and environmental studies major Katherine Paterson ’18 moves a bin of radishes into a greenhouse she constructed on the Center for the Arts green on April 16. The greenhouse build was part of her senior thesis, which was accompanied by a performance and harvest on Earth Day. Paterson also is minoring in German studies.

Senior Katherine Paterson’s passion for theater and environmental studies has grown over the past two months while she constructed a greenhouse for an honors thesis that explores and links together urban farming, communal activity, and theater.

On Earth Day, April 22, Paterson presented (at)tend, a durational performance of song, poetry, and spoken word, which unfolded over the course of the spring semester. The project involved the collective construction, seeding, and tending of a greenhouse by students and community members, and culminated with a spring harvest.

“The goal of the project was to serve as an experiment in creative place-making—in creating a space that the larger Wesleyan community helps to build and maintain,” she said. “A greenhouse containing living plants brings people together and links them with one another and their environment.”

The thesis also explored the questions, “Where does our food come from? How does it grow? How does changing our relationship to food affect our interactions with one another and with our environments?”

Paterson’s advisor is Katherine Brewer Ball, assistant professor of theater. The project was sponsored by the Wesleyan Green Fund, the Department of Theater and the College of the Environment.

A photo essay of the thesis project is below (photos by Olivia Drake MALS ’08):

Feb. 29: Paterson kicked off the project inside a cold frame at Long Lane Farm. Cold-frame structures allow gardeners to get a head start on the growing season. Students broke up compacted soil and filled large bins. Paterson taught fellow students how to plant seeds and mark containers.

During the summer of 2017, Paterson conducted field research in New York City (funded by a College of the Environment grant). She interned at Harlem Grown, an urban farm, and visited Swale, a floating food forest. The experiences helped shape and inform her thesis project.