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ITS Urges Users to Use Different Passwords at Different Websites

(Article submitted by Vince Spiars, information security and operations manager)

Passwords are like house keys
In this article, we compare passwords to house keys and talk about why you should use a different password for each website. We also remind you that Wesleyan, or any reputable organization, will never ask for your password, or ask you to log in to verify your account.

Protecting your password is as important as keeping the keys to your house safe and secure
Just like the physical keys you have on your key ring, passwords unlock access to your private digital places such as email, banking, credit card, news, information, shopping, and social websites. At work, your password is a similar key that grants you access to services and possibly sensitive information at Wesleyan; however, a breach of this access may not just impact you. If you work with or have access to PII (Personally Identifiable Information) like Social Security numbers, grades, credit card numbers, or demographic information, a compromise of your password could affect many constituents. So, protect your passwords like you protect your house keys.

Do not use the same password for different websites
The news reports the breaching of companies around the globe almost daily—Target, Equifax, TJMaxx, Panera, Macys, and LinkedIn to name just a few. If you use the same password for multiple sites and one account gets breached, all your accounts should be considered breached because the bad guys will try your password on other sites.

Furthermore, if you use your Wesleyan email address for your account and use the same password as your Wesleyan account then you have just provided the bad guys access to all the information you have access to at Wesleyan, which includes your payroll/direct deposit information. A common use of purloined passwords is to change payroll direct deposits.

Use a password manager
Using unique passwords for each website/account could be challenging to remember, but there are free tools out there called password managers to help you manage all your unique passwords. Passwords managers work with most web browsers to store and use passwords across all your websites. At Wesleyan, we have a pilot program using a password manager called LastPass (www.lastpass.com). You can sign up for a free personal LastPass account for all your personal websites like flowers.com, amazon.com, washingtonpost.com, etc. For your work-related passwords, you can request a LastPass enterprise account. Please email security@wesleyan.edu if you would like to try LastPass for Wesleyan-related passwords. The Wesleyan version of LastPass also allows you to share passwords with others on your team.

We will NEVER ask for your password or for you to confirm your password or account
We do not want your password. If there is ever a concern about your password, you will be asked to change it in WesPortal.

Consulting Firm to Assess State of Information Technology Services

This summer and fall, ITS is partnering with an outside consulting firm, BerryDunn, to assess the state of Information Technology Services and related services at Wesleyan.

This review is intended to help ITS:

  • Gain a fresh perspective on our use and management of technology
  • Identify opportunities to design future ITS services
  • Assess ITS service delivery mechanisms, practices, and development
  • Make the best use of our ITS resources

BerryDunn, a consulting firm experienced in higher education information technology, will lead this effort. As part of this work, BerryDunn team members will be requesting relevant information about the current state of ITS, administering web-based surveys, and conducting two sessions of on-site interviews with students, faculty, and staff. Surveys will be distributed to the appropriate stakeholder groups before each round of interviews.

The first round of on-site interviews and focus groups are planned for Aug. 20–22. BerryDunn will meet with administrative and ITS staff during this first visit. The BerryDunn team will conduct the second round of on-site meetings with students and faculty when they return to campus in September. Specific dates and meeting times will be communicated at a later date.

In the upcoming weeks, ITS will send an assessment survey, via email, to the campus community.

“Your participation in this survey will be important in helping BerryDunn understand the strengths, challenges, and opportunities that you see in your current ITS environment,” said Dave Baird, vice president for information technology and chief information officer. “As this project moves forward, the input and perspective of stakeholders such as yourself will help Wesleyan gain the greatest value from this effort.”

The project is scheduled to be completed by November.

Wesleyan Offers Streamlined Solution for University Printing Needs

The Office of Communications, in collaboration with the Finance Office, has worked with several print vendors this spring to offer a cost-effective, streamlined solution for university printing. This effort involved consolidating print vendors to help the university achieve greater savings through a three-year, no-price-increase agreement, streamlining the work order and invoicing process, and establishing clear turnaround times and quality paper stocks from those designated as “preferred print vendors.”

Wesleyan’s preferred print vendors are Dupli, Paladin, Hitchcock, and Wesleyan’s own Cardinal Printing. Wesleyan’s Cardinal Printing service will be prioritized first, to the extent that they can complete the order in a timely manner. All preferred print vendors now accept the university P-Card for convenient payment processing (except for Cardinal Printing, which accepts Smartkeys). These vendors can be used for orders such as postcards, brochures, booklets, posters, invitations, and certificates, to name a few items. In addition to our preferred print vendor list, we also partnered with Allied Printing for specialty and high-end print work, and we negotiated preferred rates for the university. Call Jen Carlstrom, manager of design services (x3180), if you need additional vendor contact information.

As one of Wesleyan’s preferred print vendors, Dupli will continue to fulfill requests via their web portal for university stationary, business cards, and other printed office materials, thereby accommodating the university’s initiative to offer a streamlined, cost-effective solution for printing. Their web portal automates the order process through its entire lifecycle.

If you currently request print design projects through University Communications, the design team will work with a preferred print vendor to fulfill your print and/or mail house request and provide your department with the highest quality, lowest-cost printing solution. To streamline the payment process, the designer will provide the print vendor with the work order containing all of the job specifications, and once approved, the quote and invoice will be sent directly to the requesting department from the print vendor for approvals and payment processing.

To request a project, please fill out the University Communications’s Creative Brief form.

Employees Serve as Panelists at Sustainability Conference

Three Wesleyan employees participated in the Northeast Campus Sustainability Consortium’s Annual Meeting June 4-5. The meeting focused on effective collaborations within campus, between campuses, and between campus and community.

Three Wesleyan employees participated in the Northeast Campus Sustainability Consortium’s Annual Meeting, June 4–5 in Beckham Hall. The meeting focused on effective collaborations within a campus, between campuses, and between campus and community.

Valerie Nye, director of financial services; Jeff Murphy, facilities business manager; and Joyce Jacobsen, provost and vice president for academic affairs, participated on a panel focused on the theme "How to effect meaningful change by working with senior leaders."

Valerie Nye, director of financial services; Jeff Murphy, facilities business manager; and Joyce Jacobsen, provost and vice president for academic affairs, participated on a panel focused on the theme “How to effect meaningful change by working with senior leaders.”

Wesleyan in the News

In this recurring feature in The Wesleyan Connection, we highlight some of the latest news stories about Wesleyan and our alumni.

Recent Wesleyan News

  1. The Forward: Jewish Student is Youngest Woman Ever to Finish ‘American Ninja Warrior’ Course

Casey Rothschild ’20 is interviewed about her path to become, at 20, the youngest woman ever to complete the course in the popular sports competition TV show. Rothschild is also a track star, pole vaulter, circus artist, and dedicated student.

2. TIMEThe 25 Moments From American History That Matter Right Now

In this compendium of important moments in American history, Courtney Fullilove, associate professor of history, associate professor of science in society, contributed an entry about July 8, 1853, when Commodore Matthew Perry sailed his steam-powered ships into Tokyo Bay. She writes, “His insistence that the Japanese trade with the United States hinged on a belief that international commerce was a marker of civilization. He had no sense that military enforcement of this norm diminished its value, or that of the numerous American manufactures he brought as gifts.”

3. Hartford Courant: Wesleyan Janitor Facing Deportation Honored by University for Service to Students

Francisco Acosta, an employee of Sun Services, was awarded the Peter Morgenstern-Clarren scholarship for his service and impact on students.

4. The Times Literary Supplement: Don’t Listen to the Critics

In this essay, Hirsch Sawhney, assistant professor of English, writes about the author Michael Ondaatje, whose poetry and prose have made him a bestselling author, “while also earning him the ire of literary critics.”

5. Charleston Gazette-Mail: Appalachian Scholar Project helps Charleston teens prepare for college

Students from Wesleyan have been helping African-American teenage girls get into colleges — especially prestigious, out-of-state institutions.

Recent Alumni News

  1. ESPN: Michele Roberts [’77] Elected to Another Four-Year Term as NBPA Executive Director“The National Basketball Players Association unanimously elected Michele Roberts to serve another four-year term as executive director, union president Chris Paul announced Tuesday,” wrote ESPN staff writer Tim McMahon, and quoted Roberts on “’creat[ing] a system that allowed them [the players] to really believe that I and the team we assembled were going to be interested in one … priority only, and that is the best interest of the players.'”

2. New York Times Book Review: A White House Memoir That’s Equal Parts C-Span and ‘Sex and the City’

Paul Begala, political consultant, commentator, and former adviser to President Bill Clinton, reviews From the Corner of the Oval (Spiegel & Grau, 2018) by Beck Dorey-Stein ’08. He calls it an “addictively readable memoir … that is improbable even by White House standards.”

3. The Boston Globe: This CEO Doesn’t Like to Be Cornered

A profile of Dr. David Schenkein ’79, P’08, “CEO of Agios Pharmaceuticals Inc. in Cambridge, [who] runs a biotech startup that won approval last August for its first drug, Idhifa, to treat a rare and devastating form of leukemia caused by a genetic mutation.”

4. Forbes: The Three Tactics This Radio Personality Used to Make Her Mark in Media

Angela Yee ’97, “one-third of the popular The Breakfast Club, Power 105.1’s syndicated morning radio show based in New York,” profiled by Pauleanna Reid, features mentoring advice from Yee, including ”reach back to educate.”

5. Forbes: The Founder Of Tala On Her Leap From Finance To Fundraising For Her Mission-Driven Startup

Shivani Siroya ’04, founder and CEO of Tala, talks with Forbes staff writer Tanya Klich at Forbes Women’s Summit, delineating her fundraising process in a Q&A, as well as in a backstage video.

6. New York Times: ‘Emojiland’ and a Graceful Elegy at the New York Musical Festival

The “graceful elegy” is If Sand Were Stone, reviewed by Laura Collins-Hughes, who considered it a “strong offering” of that week. (Now closed, it was at the Acorn Theater.) It also featured the talents of recent alumni. Collins-Hughes writes: “With book and lyrics by Carly Brooke Feinman [’16] and music by Cassie Willson [’17], it’s a show whose subject—a middle-aged woman’s fast unraveling from early-onset Alzheimer’s disease—risks turning off potential audience members. But as staged by Tyler Thomas, with spare yet essential choreography by Nora Thompson [’15], part of this musical’s triumph is its sensitivity and grace.”

Ricci PhD ’14 Awarded Congressional Fellowship

(by Christine Foster)

James Ricci PhD ’14, an assistant professor of mathematics at Daemen College was named a Congressional Fellow. (Photo by Darrell Porter, Daemen College)

James Ricci PhD `14 was awarded a 2018-2019 Congressional Fellowship. The program is administered by the American Association for the Advancement of Science in conjunction with The American Mathematical Society.

During this year-long fellowship, Ricci will be paired with either a member of Congress or a congressional committee. Fellows work as special legislative assistants learning about policy creation and contributing their own technical and academic expertise. “They are looking for people who are able to speak clearly and be advocates for STEM education,” says Ricci, who spoke by phone from a salmon fishing boat in Ketchikan, Alaska, where he is working this summer. “I am hopeful that I am all of those things.”

At Wesleyan, Ricci did research on number theory, with a primary focus on the arithmetic theory of quadratic forms. In April 2014 he was chosen as graduate student of the year. Since finishing his PhD, he has been working as an assistant professor of mathematics at Daemen College, near Buffalo, N.Y.

At Daemen, Ricci has worked on a team working to improve retention of students entering with weaker math backgrounds. This included reworking a computer science course he teaches adding in engaging current topics including cybersecurity, cryptocurrencies, artificial intelligence and net neutrality.

Tyner ’13 Named Fulbright National Geographic Storytelling Fellow

William Tyner ’13 is headed to Romania on a year-long Fulbright National Geographic Fellowship. He will create an immersive film documenting the civic-tech group, Code for Romania.

William Tyner ’13 was awarded a Fulbright National Geographic Storytelling Fellowship —one of only five of such grants awarded each year

The fellowship is made possible through a partnership between the U.S. Department of State and the National Geographic Society and is a component of the Fulbright U.S. Student Program. It provides opportunities for U.S. citizens to participate in an academic year of overseas travel and storytelling on a globally significant theme.

Tyner, who majored in anthropology at Wesleyan and enjoyed courses in the College of Film and the Moving Image, will be working with Code for Romania. He’ll be creating a documentary series that will explore Romania’s civic technology community.

“’Civic tech’ is a nascent field in which local ‘hacktivists’ use technology to deepen democracy and increase civic engagement,” he explained in his application.

Tyner notes that he has been affiliated with Codes for America, an organization that focuses on technology as a pathway to modernize government, make it more accessible—but he wanted “to observe civic tech as a social movement, from a sociological perspective.”

Romania, he says, will be the perfect place for his lens: “Their civic tech community is emerging within a historically unique anti-corruption movement. I’m going to chronicle a story of people taking action and control in their community.”

Doris Duke Foundation Supports ICPP’s Performing Artist Case Studies

This summer, students seeking a master’s degree in performance curation from Wesleyan’s Institute for Curatorial Practice in Performance (ICPP) are working on six performing artist case studies funded by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation.

On July 16, the ICPP Entrepreneurial Strategies class discussed their first artist — Becca Blackwell, an award-winning trans actor, performer and writer based in New York City. Blackwell is working with consultants and mentors at ICPP to develop a strategic framework for the next two to five years of their career. Blackwell will also be presenting their work at Wesleyan on October 5.

Photos of the class are below: (Photos by Richard Marinelli)

This summer, students seeking a master's degree in performance curation from Wesleyan's Institute for Curatorial Practice in Performance are busy taking classes. 

Sarah Wilbur and Paul-Bonin Rodriguez are teaching the Entrepreneurial Strategies course this summer.

Students Share Summer Research Projects at Poster Session

Cher Qin ’21 presented her quantitative analysis study titled “Text Classification of 2016 Presidential Campaign Advertisement” during a poster session July 26. Qin’s advisors are Pavel Oleinikov, associate director of the Quantitative Analysis Center, and Erika Franklin Fowler, associate professor of government.

More than 135 undergraduate research fellows shared their summer-long research during a poster session on July 26 in Exley Science Center.

Students from the Psychology Department, College of the Environment, Biology Department, Neuroscience and Behavior Program, Chemistry Department, Physics Department, Astronomy Department, Math and Computer Science Department, Quantitative Analysis Center, Molecular Biology and Biochemistry Department, and Astronomy Department presented posters. Posters often contain text, graphics, and images that illustrate the students’ research results on a single board. Poster session attendees can view the posters and interact with the authors.

The summer research program is hosted by the College of Integrative Sciences.

“We had possibly the largest poster session ever this year, with presentations by students from across the sciences, as well as many departments in the social sciences,” said Francis Starr, professor of physics, professor of integrative sciences, professor of molecular biology and biochemistry, head of the College of Integrative Sciences. “Year after year, I am in awe of what our Wesleyan students are capable of.”

Photos of the poster sessions are below: (Photos by Olivia Drake)

Rochelle Spencer ’20 shared her poster titled “Dendrimer Synthesis via Highly Efficient Thoil-Michael Reactions.” Her advisor is Brian Northrop, associate professor of chemistry, associate professor of integrative sciences.

Art by 4 Alumni Featured in Popular Michael Jackson Exhibit

Artistic creations by four Wesleyan alumni are displayed as part of the National Portrait Gallery’s landmark exhibit, Michael Jackson on the Wall.

The contemporary art exhibition, which closes on Oct. 21, explores the influence of pop-music icon Michael Jackson and spans several generations of artists across all media. The exhibition opened to coincide with what would have been Jackson’s 60th birthday, on Aug. 29, 2018.

The exhibit occupies 14 rooms and includes the works of Glenn Ligon ’82, Jonathan Horowitz ’87, Michael Gittes ’10, and Lyle Ashton Harris ’88. The Wesleyan alumni are among 48 artists who have their work displayed, including Andy Warhol,  KAWS, Candice Breitz, David LaChapelle, Kehinde Wiley, and Mark Ryden.

Although the majority of the pieces are drawn from public and private collections around the world, some works were made especially for the exhibition, including an experimental video by American studies major Gittes. Gittes was honored by 43 Wesleyan alumni, students, parents, and friends in London on July 3.

Horowitz, who majored in philosophy at Wesleyan, also contributed a video to On the Wall. In 1997, Horowitz created “The Body Song,” which is a video reverse of Jackson’s “The Earth Song” music video. In the original video, disaster occurs and is undone through Michael’s healing rage. In “The Body Song,” disaster occurs and is undone through the repression of Michael’s rage.

Ligon ’82, an art major, contributed his ink drawing of “Self-Portrait at Seven Years Old.”

And Harris, an art studio major, recreated a 2017 cover of Ebony magazine on an African funerary fabric, a year after the King of Pop’s death.

Jonathan Horowitz ’87 made a single-channel video titled “The Body Song” in 1997. The video is 5 minutes and 57 seconds in duration.

Jonathan Horowitz ’87 made a single-channel video titled “The Body Song” in 1997. The video is 5 minutes and 57 seconds in duration.

Glenn Ligon ’82 created “Self-Portrait at Seven Years Old,” using ink and graphite on paper in 2005.

Lyle Ashton Harris ’88 recreated the cover of Ebony using acrylic on kente cloth in 2009.

Class of 2022 Welcomed at Summer Sendoffs Worldwide

Wesleyan’s newest students and their families are welcomed to the Wesleyan community during a series of Summer Sendoffs held July 19 to Aug. 15. Alumni and parents are hosting the events at various locations around the world including Boston; Beijing; Hong Kong; New York City; Mumbai; Seattle; Washington, D.C.; Philadelphia; and more.

All members of the Wesleyan community are invited to attend the casual socials. Pictured below are photos from a few of the gatherings.

Carmen Cheung ’05 and Alecia Ng ’14 organized the Hong Kong Summer Sendoff on July 19:

Cho Named U.S.-Korea NextGen Scholar

Joan Cho is one of 11 U.S.-Korea NextGen Scholars in the country.

As a 2018-19 U.S.-Korea NextGen Scholar, Joan Cho, assistant professor of East Asian studies, will develop public policy skills and learn how to provide commentary and expertise on issues related to Korea.

The U.S.-Korea NextGen Scholars Program is a unique two-year non-resident program that provides opportunities for mid-career Korea specialists to discuss issues of importance to U.S.-Korea relations with policymakers, government officials, and opinion leaders in Korea and the United States, learn how to effectively engage with the media, participate in the policymaking process, gain experience as public intellectuals helping to bridge the scholarly and policy communities, and address issues of importance to the U.S.-Korea relationship.

“As a Korean-American scholar of contemporary Korean politics, it is my goal to better inform Koreans and Americans that the U.S.-Korea relationship is not limited to foreign relations on a national level,” Cho said. “The NextGen Scholar program will provide me with the opportunity to engage with key policymakers in Washington and Seoul. I’ll also be able to network with like-minded scholars from diverse backgrounds, and collaborate on various research/policy-relevant projects while learning to become a public intellectual.”