Campus News & Events

Experts to Discuss the Historic Decision on Net Neutrality

“Right Now! The Historic Decision on Net Neutrality, and What it Means for the Future” will be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Oct. 12 in the Hansel Lecture Hall (Room 001 Public Affairs Center).

Panelists include Jessica Rosenworcel ’93, FCC Commissioner; Brad Burnham ‘77, managing partner at Union Square Ventures; and Christiaan Hogendorn, associate professor of economics.

Norm Danner, associate professor of computer science, will moderate the event.

Photographs by Albert MALS ’94 Exhibited in Olin Library

Hillcrest Orchards © 2016 Nancy Ottmann Albert

Hillcrest Orchards © 2016 Nancy Ottmann AlbertNancy Ottmann Albert’s (MALS ’94) evocative photographs of vanishing New England structures and landscapes will be featured in “Documents in Black and White,” a new exhibition opening in Olin Library on Oct. 5, 2016. The show is being presented in conjunction with the formal announcement of Albert’s gift of her papers to the library’s Special Collections & Archives (SC&A).

Nancy Ottmann Albert’s (MALS ’94) evocative photographs of vanishing New England structures and landscapes will be featured in “Documents in Black and White,” a new exhibition opening in Olin Library on Oct. 5, 2016. The show is being presented in conjunction with the formal announcement of Albert’s gift of her papers to the library’s Special Collections & Archives (SC&A).

Albert will speak about her work at 7 p.m. Oct. 28 in the library’s Develin Room.

Selected by the artist, the works span the 30 years she spent documenting New England’s built environment. Inspired by Walker Evans and the 1930s Farm Security Administration photographers, she began to photograph textile mills and industrial sites throughout New England in 1981. Shooting black and white film in a medium format camera, she returned over the years to record the buildings’ decline and disappearance.

Further exploration led her to seek out other endangered structures and landscapes. These include mental institutions emptied by changing philosophies of treatment and a commissioned study of Long River Village, Middletown’s oldest housing project, prior to its demolition.
The exhibition also contains images of roadside and urban vernacular architecture, barns and abandoned homesteads, filling stations, and drive-in theaters. All of the work, which includes gelatin silver photographs, was printed by the artist.

In 2014, Albert donated her papers to SC&A. Her papers include images taken in New England, France, Cuba, Portugal, Spain, London, Italy, Eastern Europe, Vienna, Barcelona, Bosnia, Slovenia, Croatia and Berlin, along with her research notes. The papers are now freely available for research and are described in an online finding aid. The gift will be formally acknowledged prior to her Oct 28. talk.

“Documents in Black and White” will be on view from Oct. 5 through Dec. 16, 2016, in the SC&A exhibition cases on the first floor of Olin Library during normal library hours. For more information, call 860-685-3863 or e-mail sca@wesleyan.edu.

Grossman to Advise Queen’s University’s Economic Programs

At Queen’s University, in Belfast, Northern Ireland, Richard Grossman, professor of economics, was appointed to the International Advisory Board of Queen’s University Center for Economic History, where he will advise on the university’s many economic programs. Grossman also served as an external examiner on a PhD thesis titled, “Bears and Bubbles in Financial Markets: Essays on the British Bicycle Mania,” at Queen’s University.

Grossman also presented his co-authored papers “Beresford’s Revenge: British equity holdings in Latin America, 1869-1929,” and “Long-Run Patters and Shifts in Wealth—Insights from Irish Share Prices since 1825,” Sept. 1-2 at the 6th Eurhistock Conference, a conference focusing on the history of the European stock market.

Anarchist Histories and Activism Presentations Oct. 1

On Oct. 1, Wesleyan students will publicly present their research from the American studies course, Anarchy in America: From Haymarket Riot to Occupy Wall Street, taught by J. Kēhaulani Kauanui, chair and professor of American studies, professor of anthropology. The course focused on anarchism as a political philosophy and practice — a little known, aspect of American culture and society.

Students examined select aspects of anarchist political thought and praxis in the United States and the ways that anarchism has been represented positively, vilified or dismissed. The course explored a range of diverse political traditions including: individualist anarchism, socialist anarchism, anarcha-feminism, black anarchism, queer anarchism, indigenous influences and critiques, and other schools of thought. These presentations – by self-selected students from the class — are based on the final assignment for the course, a research-based political pamphlet. Kauanui will moderate two panels:

10 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. Historical Genealogies & Radical Analysis
“Free Love, Motherhood, and Spiritism: Reading Anarchy Through the Writings of Luisa Capetillo,” Iryelis López ’17
“Love as Prefigurative Politics,” Sarah Lurie ’17
“Black Feminist Resonances: The Overlaps and Intersections With Anarchist Principles,” Kaiyana Cervera ’19

Noon to 1:30 p.m. Community Resistance and Diverse Forms of Direct Action
“Encrypted But Not Cryptic: An Intro to Crypto Anarchy and Practical Resistance of the Modern Surveillance State,” Kate Pappas ’18
“Threads of Anarchism: A Look at Flint Community Action Amidst a State Crime,” Aura Ochoa ’17
“Power to the People! Energy Democracy and the Socialization of our Energy Infrastructure,” Joshua Nodiff ’19

The presentations will take place at Russell Library, 123 Broad Street, Middletown, CT 06457.

Wesleyan Local Food Co-Op Open to Campus Community

Wesleyan students, staff and faculty may join the Local Food Co-Op. Fresh produce, dairy items, bread and roasted items are delivered to Wesleyan once a week throughout the academic year for pick-up.

Wesleyan students, staff and faculty may join the Local Food Co-Op. Fresh produce, dairy items, bread and roasted items are delivered to Wesleyan once a week throughout the academic year for pick-up.

The student-run Wesleyan Local Food Co-op sources a large variety of fresh foods and distributes them on campus. The co-op offers locally grown produce, fresh dairy products (cheese, milk, yogurt, butter and ice cream), meat, eggs, tofu, seitan, preserves, bread and coffee.

eve_coop_2015-0218181028Sign up for the co-op online by Sept. 21 and pay from 3:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Sept. 28 in Daniel Family Commons.

The program began solely for students but is now open to staff and faculty participation in the wake of expressed interest. More than 500 members of the Wesleyan community are part of one or more co-ops.

Participants can pick up their shares on Wednesday evenings in the Usdan Multi-Purpose Room on the ground floor and must volunteer once each semester with organization and distribution.

For more information e-mail wesleyanlocalcoop@gmail.com.

Transportation Services’ New 14-Passenger Bus Moves Students More Efficiently

Wesleyan’s Transportation Department announces the addition of a new 14-passenger bus to the Wesleyan RIDE system fleet.

Wesleyan’s Transportation Department announces the addition of a new 14-passenger bus to the Wesleyan RIDE system fleet.

Wesleyan’s Transportation Services Department announces the addition of a new 14-passenger bus to the Wesleyan RIDE system fleet. The RIDE is a free shuttle service with 17 stops around campus. The department also provides a free off-campus grocery shuttle service to Price Chopper and Aldi on Sunday afternoons.

“Adding this bus to the RIDE program will allow us to move more people, more efficiently, and more comfortably,” said Joe Martocci, transportation services manager.

The RIDE shuttles are available seven nights a week, and Martocci says volume picks up on the weekends.

“We move over 500 students every weekend. The idea to add another vehicle was to make it more enjoyable for students to use the shuttles,” he explained. On the weekends, there are now three vehicles in rotation to meet the high demand of students who need a safe way to get around campus at night. All are equipped with GPS units so students can see their location from a mobile app.

Joe Martocci, transportation services manager, explains the features of the RIDE's new 14-passenger bus.

Joe Martocci, transportation services manager, explains the features of the new 14-passenger bus. (Photos by Randi Plake)

Martocci, who has worked at Wesleyan for 11 years, says the changes to the RIDE come from listening to the students and seeking advice from Public Safety Director Scott Rohde.

“We have changed some of the stops. Adding a larger vehicle and modifying the routes will be an experiment, but historically when students suggest ideas, we listen.”

Moreover, Martocci and his crew have added new shuttle stops signs around campus. The new signs are reflective and more identifiable for students on the RIDE.

Martocci notes that the bus provides comfort as well as safety features. Well-lighted on both the inside and outside, with rows of comfortable leather seats, it is also spacious, with enough room for students to enter and exit the bus quickly. Additionally, four video cameras provide an extra layer of security for all who are riding the bus.

To learn more about RIDE and the other services offered by the Transportation department, click here. Students can download the mobile app—Wes Shuttle (iTunes and Android)—and see where the shuttle is in real-time. Persons with disabilities can access special shuttle services by calling 860-982-8031 (day) or 860-685-3788 (evenings).

Hudes’ New Musical Focuses on Family in an Ever-Changing American Society

Quiara Alegria Hudes

Quiara Alegria Hudes

Miss You Like Hell is a new musical written by the Shapiro Distinguished Professor of Writing and Theater, Quiara Alegria Hudes. Focusing on what it means to be a family in an ever-changing American society, Hudes’ work follows the story of a “whip-smart, deeply imaginative teenager and her free spirited Latina mother, as they embark on a road trip.”

Commissioned by Christopher Ashley, the artistic director at La Jolla Playhouse, in La Jolla, California, the production is a new piece that embraces the idea of changing identities. Ashley states in an a broadwayworld.com article, “this is exactly the right time for their powerful and moving new musical…”

Hudes received her BA in music composition from Yale University and a MFA in playwriting from Brown University. Boasting an extensive list of accomplishments, Hudes received the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for drama for her play Water by the Spoonful. Her play Elliott, A Soldier’s Fugue was a Pulitzer finalist, and her most recent work, The Happiest Song Plays Last, premiered at the Goodman Theater. Hudes also wrote the book to the Tony Award winning musical, In the Heights, where Wesleyan alumni Lin Manual-Miranda ’02, music and lyrics, and Thomas Kail ’99, director, also had major roles in its creation.

Miss You Like Hell will run from Oct. 25 through Dec. 4 in the Mandell Weiss Theater in La Jolla, Calif. Tickets are available at lajollaplayhouse.org.

Higgins Delivers Keynote at International Film Conference

Scott Higgins

Scott Higgins

Scott Higgins, chair and professor of film studies, delivered the keynote address during the 2016 SERCIA Conference, held Sept. 8-10 in Paris, France. The topic of his talk was “Benefits of Incoherence: Seriality in the Studio Era,” largely based on book, Matinee Melodrama: Playing with Formula in the Sound Serial (Rutgers, 2016).

SERCIA, an organization established in France in 1993, encourages teaching and research in English-speaking cinema.

During the 22nd annual conference, Higgins joined film scholars from all over the world to explore links between the filmic form and seriality.

“I argued that American sound-serials in the 1930s and 1940s, with incoherent plots, nonetheless offered certain kinds of artistic refinement,” Higgins explained. His main example was the 1944 version of Captain America. Higgins shares similar ideas in his video-blog on the sound-serial fight sequence.

This was Higgins’ second international talk in the past six months. In June, he was the respondent to a conference hosted at the John F. Kennedy Institute at the Free University in Berlin, Germany titled “Seriality Seriality Seriality: The Many Lives of the Field that Isn’t One.” Higgins shares his thoughts about the conference online here.

Jeanine Basinger, the Corwin-Fuller Professor of Film Studies, admires her colleague for his recent international efforts.

“I think it’s a reflection on how important a young scholar he is,” Basinger said. “I feel happy that the future of Film Studies at Wesleyan is in such good hands because he is also a great teacher and colleague.”

At Wesleyan, Higgins teaches courses about film history, genre and aesthetics. His other books include Harnessing the Rainbow: Technicolor Aesthetics in the 1930s and Arnheim for Film and Media Studies. He offered the first ever Massive Open Online Course in film on Coursera, and maintains the blog Thinking Cinematically.

Public Affairs, Progressive News Coverage New to WESU 88.1 FM’s Fall Programming

WESU 88.1 FM recently kicked off its 2016-2017 season with a new and improved fall program. With a mixture of both new and old radio shows, the fall programming boasts a diverse blend of news and public affairs from NPR, Pacifica, and other independent and local media sources. Changes to their fall programming include, the addition of a much anticipated daily public affairs program from Pacifica called “Rising up with Sonali,” which brings progressive news coverage, rooted in gender and racial justice, to a wide audience. They also will pay tribute to Jim Mascia, a cherished, late co-host of “Best of Living Naturally,” a popular, locally produced radio show that promoted a holistic lifestyle, which aired for 10 years on WESU.

“Overall, the aim of WESU’s fall program is to maintain the eclectic, alternative, and funky mix of music and talk radio that makes WESU so unique,” said Ben Michael, WESU general manager.

Established in 1939 as a community service of Wesleyan, WESU is one of the oldest, non-commercial radio stations in the U.S. While its daytime programming consists of news and public affairs, weeknights and weekends offer a freeform blend of creative music programming, featuring everything from rock and hip-hop, to jazz and electronic dance music. To learn more about WESU, including listen to a live stream, find contact information, see DJ playlists and the program guide, visit www.wesufm.org.

Wesleyan Football Drafts 10-Year-Old Michael from Team IMPACT

michael2

The Wesleyan football team poses for a team photo with their newest member, Michael, pictured in center with the No. 5 jersey.

On Sept. 10, Wesleyan’s football team welcomed its newest member to the program, 10-year old Michael from Team IMPACT.

Michael receives high-fives and handshakes from the Wesleyan football team.

Michael receives high-fives and handshakes from the Wesleyan football team.

Michael, from Cromwell, Conn., was born with an immune dysfunction and is blind in one eye. He also suffers from cardiac issues, developmental delays and cognitive impairments. Michael started speaking at 4 1/2 years old and took his first step at 2 1/2. He now walks independently and has scoliosis in his spine. Because of his immune deficiency, he is very susceptible to getting sick.

Partnering with Team IMPACT, whose focus is to improve the quality of life for children facing life-threatening and chronic illnesses through the power of team, the Cardinals made Michael apart of their team.

Wesleyan’s leadership group, which consists of seniors Ike Fuchs, Shane Jenkins and Jordan Stone, junior Jake Cronin and Khephren Spigner, and sophomores Ryan Earle, Isaiah Thomas, came together and came up with the idea to officially draft Michael before the teams’ intrasquad scrimmage. The Cardinals created a tunnel of players for Michael to run through, where he would meet Head Coach Dan DiCenzo at the 50-yard line. From there, DiCenzo handed him a jersey and hat, and named him the team’s official No. 1 draft pick.

The leadership group also thought of the idea to run a play for Michael near the end of scrimmage, in which they handed him the ball as the 10-year old ran into the endzone for a touchdown.

Kolcio, Stanton Create, Perform “Steppe Lands” as Freedom Dance Ukraine

Associate Professor of Dance Katja Kolcio, left, and Associate Professor of Dance Nicole Stanton, right, perform with Freedom Dance Ukraine this summer. The project was based on Kolcio's recent work in Ukraine. (Photo by Lucy Guiliano)

Associate Professor of Dance Katja Kolcio, bottom left, and Associate Professor of Dance Nicole Stanton, bottom right, perform with Freedom Dance Ukraine this summer. The project was based on Kolcio’s recent work in Ukraine. Other members of the ensemble: (above, left to right): Elvira Demerdzhy Julian Kytasty, Alina Kuzma.  (Photo by Lucy Guiliano)

A Connecticut dance event offered Associate Professor of Dance Katja Kolcio an additional way to explore her ongoing dance/movement project highlighting the effect of political forces at work in Ukraine.

Last summer, Kolcio invited colleague and Associate Professor of Dance Nicole Stanton to join with two other dancers, both with ties to Ukraine, to create a dance. This event, Dance for Peace, was sponsored by Artists for World Peace, an organization founded and led by Wendy Black-Nasta P’07, with music director Robert Nasta MA ’98, P’07.

Kolcio, who holds a doctorate in somatics, places the dance they created, “Steppe Land,” in the context of her project in Ukraine, where she has familial roots.

Cohan Presents Research at Microbial Ecology Symposium

cohanposter
Frederick Cohan, professor of biology, professor of environmental studies, presented his research poster, “Genetic Sweeps by Whisk Brooms and Garage Brooms — the Role of Ecology” at the 16th annual International Symposium on Microbial Ecology, held Aug. 21-26 in Montreal. Cohan presented his models on the origins of bacterial species, in particular that the rate a bacterial group forms new species is determined by the foods it consumes.

Microbial ecology is the study of microbes in the environment and their interactions with each other.

The International Society for Microbial Ecology is the principle non-profit scientific society for the burgeoning field of microbial ecology and its related disciplines. ISME fosters the exchange of scientific information by organizing international symposia as well as specific workshops, sponsoring publications, and promoting education/research. The society offers financial and travel awards during its symposia and provides services to the scientific as well as the wider community.