Tag Archive for CFA

Media, Art, Graffiti, Technology Intersect in New Zilkha Gallery Exhibit

Artist Evan Roth's work occupies the irregular zone at the intersection of free culture with popular culture, where viral media meets art, and graffiti connects with technology. From Feb. 5-March 2, Roth's "Intellectual Property Donor," is on display in the Center for the Art's Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery. Ginger Gregg Duggan and Judith Hoos Fox of c², curatorsquared, co-curated the exhibit.

Artist Evan Roth’s work occupies the irregular zone at the intersection of free culture with popular culture, where viral media meets art, and graffiti connects with technology. From Feb. 5-March 2, Roth’s “Intellectual Property Donor,” is on display in the Center for the Art’s Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery. Ginger Gregg Duggan and Judith Hoos Fox of c², curatorsquared, co-curated the exhibit.

The images, objects and experiences in the exhibition Intellectual Property Donor suggest a new way to exist within the current environment shaped by our participation in an increasingly cyber and global world, yet grounded in our need for materiality and personal connections. Pictured is Compilation, 2014, a single channel video.

The images, objects and experiences in the exhibition Intellectual Property Donor suggest a new way to exist within the current environment shaped by our participation in an increasingly cyber and global world, yet grounded in our need for materiality and personal connections. Pictured is Compilation, 2014, a single channel video.

CFA Receives Doris Duke Foundation’s Grant Award for Adaptability

Pamela Tatge

Pamela Tatge

The Center for the Arts received an unsolicited national grant award of $400,000 from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation in November 2013. The CFA is one of five arts organizations that will receive a total of $3.5 million in funding to help further develop long-term capacity to respond to changing conditions in the performing arts sector and the world at large, including those related to demographics, audience behavior and the impact of technology.

The grants were not open for application. Instead, an anonymous panel identified five organizations that have demonstrated a sustained appetite to innovate and experiment in ways that inform and lead their respective fields. Each organization will go through an organizational self-analysis, followed by an external assessment. Then they will develop and implement strategies and tactics to best enhance their long-term capacity to adapt.

The grantees will receive support over a period of up to four years. Appropriate uses of this money include, but are not limited to, staff expansion, creation of capital reserves, professional development, technology, board and staff retreats, convenings and consultants.

Pamela Tatge, director of the Center for the Arts, said the CFA staff is honored to be recognized. “This grant will allow us to lay the groundwork for continued innovation and exciting programs that serve the campus and community, and advance the creativity of Wesleyan faculty and students and the talented artists we bring to campus,” she said.

The mission of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation is to improve the quality of people’s lives through grants supporting the performing arts, environmental conservation, medical research and the prevention of child abuse, and through preservation of the cultural and environmental legacy of Doris Duke’s properties. The Foundation’s Arts Program focuses its support on contemporary dance, jazz and theater artists, and the organizations that nurture, present and produce them.

“This exciting award really speaks to the CFA’s tradition – 40 years and counting – of building a community of creativity and experimentation,” said Wesleyan President Michael Roth. “Under Director Pamela Tatge’s leadership our Center for the Arts has found ways to engage an increasingly diverse audience. An award like this also recognizes and supports Wesleyan’s extraordinary commitment to the arts.”

NEA Grant Support Dance, Poetry at CFA

A  $50,000 grant to Wesleyan from the National Endowment for the Arts will support dance programs at the Center for the Arts and poetry initiatives at Wesleyan University Press.

The award, announced by the NEA Dec. 11, recognizes the university’s commitment to the arts across all forms of artistic expression. It includes a $30,000 grant to the CFA, the ninth NEA award to the dance programs. That represents a 50 percent increase over the 2012-2013 season grant supporting the Breaking Ground Dance Series.

“Support from the National Endowment for the Arts has been central to our ability to fulfill our mission to become a vibrant center for dance in the state, and to bring contemporary dance to audiences who might not otherwise be able to access it,” said Pamela Tatge, director of the CFA. “We are grateful for the vote of confidence that this grant implies.”

The Breaking Ground series, now in its 14th season, features cutting-edge choreography, world-renowned companies, and groups that push the boundaries of the art form. Past companies featured in the series include Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Company, Ronald K. Brown/EVIDENCE, Chunky Move and Compagnie Marie Chouinard.

The $20,000 earmarked for Wesleyan University Press will support the publication and distribution of books of poetry, to be promoted through author tours, book trailers, social media and free online teaching guides.

“We are delighted with this grant to support the poetry list,” said Suzanna Tamminen, director of the Press. “We currently publish six poetry titles per year and try to maintain a mix of established and new poets, and translations of contemporary and modernist poetry.”

In 2013, Tamminen said, Wes Press will publish The Tatters, an elegy for the end of the pristine natural world, by Brenda Coultas; In Defense of Nothing: Selected Poems, 1987-2011, the first “selected” volume by critically acclaimed poet Peter Gizzi, and Favor of Crows,  a collection of original haiku from a preeminent Native American poet and novelist, Gerald Vizenor.

Poetry was among the first areas that Wesleyan University Press published in when it was established in 1957. Since the beginning, the press has been committed to pushing the boundaries of both poetic form and the imagination, and over the years, Wesleyan poets have earned many honors including Pulitzer Prizes and National Book Awards.

The grant counts toward Wesleyan’s multi-year $400 million fundraising effort supporting access, inquiry and impact across university programs.

#THISISWHY

CFA Receives Doris Duke Foundation’s Grant Award for Adaptability

A $400,000 grant from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation will support staff expansion, creation of capital reserves, professional development, technology, board or staff retreats and consultants at the Center for the Arts.

A $400,000 grant from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation will support staff expansion, creation of capital reserves, professional development, technology, or staff retreats and consultants at the Center for the Arts.

Wesleyan’s Center for the Arts is the recipient of a $400,000 grant recognizing the CFA as an innovator and leader among arts organizations.

The unsolicited gift from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation is one of five – totaling $3.5 million – given to arts centers around the country. It recognizes these centers for their “adaptability” to changing conditions in the arts sector and is intended to support the groups’ ongoing capacity to respond to these changes, according to the foundation.

“We understand that most organizations do not have enough, if any, “change capital’ – funds they can devote to maximizing their ability,” said Ben Cameron, program director for the arts at the foundation.

These changes include conditions related to demographics, audience behavior and the impact of technology.

“This exciting award really speaks to the CFA’s tradition – 40 years and counting – of building a community of creativity and experimentation,” said President Michael Roth. “Under (Director) Pam Tatge’s leadership our Center for the Arts has found ways to engage an increasingly diverse audience. An award like this also recognizes and supports Wesleyan’s extraordinary commitment to the arts.”

The grants were not open for application. An anonymous panel identified five organizations that demonstrated a sustained appetite to innovate and experiment.

The support will be given over a period of up to four years, and appropriate uses of the money include staff expansion, creation of capital reserves, professional development, technology, board and staff retreats and consultants.

Pam Tatge

Pam Tatge

“This grant came as a complete surprise to me and the staff of the CFA,” said Pamela Tatge, Director of the Center for the Arts. “We are honored to be recognized in this important way. This grant will allow us to lay the groundwork for continued innovation and exciting programs that serve the campus and community, and advance the creativity of Wesleyan faculty and students and the talented artists we bring to campus.”

The grant counts toward Wesleyan’s multi-year, $400 million THIS IS WHY campaign celebrating access, inquiry and impact.

At this time the program is a unique, one-time event, according to the Doris Duke Foundation. The other grantees were: the American Repertory Theater in Cambridge, Mass.; the Oregon Shakespeare Festive in Ashland, Ore.; Wooly Mammoth Theatre Company in Washington, D.C. (where Howard Shalwitz ’74 is artistic director) and On the Boards of Seattle, Wash.

Read more about notable recent CFA initiatives here:

The Creative Campus Initiative (http://www.wesleyan.edu/creativecampus/crossingdisciplines);  the Feet to the Fire program

(http://www.wesleyan.edu/creativecampus/crossingdisciplines/feettothefire),

and the Institute for Curatorial Practice in Performance (http://www.wesleyan.edu/icpp).

#THISISWHY

Culture of India Celebrated at Annual Navaratri Festival

The Center for the Arts presented the 37th annual Navaratri Festival, celebrating the traditional culture of India with performances by some of the country’s leading artists on Oct. 10-13. One of India’s major festival celebrations, Navaratri is a time to see family and friends, enjoy music and dance, and seek blessings for new endeavors.

“For us Indian musicians traveling all over the world and especially in the U.S., this campus has been a place of great respect and wonder because of its ability to sustain this program for over 30 years,” said tabla virtuoso Zakir Hussain, who also performed during the 2010 festival. “It is a privilege and a blessing to be a part of this incredible environment.”

The 37th annual Navaratri Festival was supported by the Music Department, the Center for the Arts, the Jon B. Higgins Memorial Fund, the Madhu Reddy Endowed Fund for Indian Music and Dance at Wesleyan University, the Raga Club of Connecticut, the New England Foundation for the Arts, Middlesex Community College, Haveli Indian Restaurant and individual patrons.

On Oct. 11, vocalist B. Balasubrahmaniyan, adjunct assistant professor of music, performed "Vocal Music of South India" as part of the festival.

On Oct. 11, vocalist B. Balasubrahmaniyan, adjunct assistant professor of music, performed “Vocal Music of South India” as part of the festival.

Balasubrahmaniyan was joined by David Nelson, adjunct assistant professor of music on mridangam and violinist L. Ramakrishnan and Sriram Ramesh on kanjira.

Balasubrahmaniyan was joined by David Nelson, adjunct assistant professor of music on mridangam and violinist L. Ramakrishnan and Sriram Ramesh on kanjira.

Student Bands Perform at The MASH

Recorded at the campus-wide MASH music festival Sept. 6, this video EP features full-length original songs performed by Wesleyan bands Molly Rocket and the Crooks, Robert Don, Novelty Daughter and Sky Bars.

The MASH is co-sponsored by the Center for the Arts, the Office of Student Affairs and the Green Street Arts Center. This second annual festival is a legacy event of Music & Public Life. Watch this video and many others on the Video @ Wesleyan website.

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The MASH Highlights Music Scene at Wesleyan

THE MASH, inspired by Fete de la Musique, also known as World Music Day, highlights the student music scene at Wesleyan. The event, which took place on Sept. 6 on multiple stages around campus, provided students with the both the opportunity to listen to some of Wesleyan’s most popular faculty and student bands, and to sign up and play for the audiences themselves. The event was sponsored by the Center for the Arts.

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Sasamoto ’04 Demonstrates Installation at Alumni Show II

On Sept. 6, the Alumni Show II at the Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery opened in honor of the Center for the Arts’ 40th anniversary. At the opening reception, Aki Sasamoto ’04, a New York-based, Japanese artist, demonstrated her installation “Centrifugal March,” questioning why certain objects seem to carry more importance over others.

On Sept. 6, the Alumni Show II at the Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery opened in honor of the Center for the Arts’ 40th anniversary. At the opening reception, Aki Sasamoto ’04, a New York-based, Japanese artist, demonstrated her installation “Centrifugal March,” questioning why certain objects seem to carry more importance over others.

Ebrecht Performs “Bach to School” on Memorial Chapel Organ

Ronald Ebrecht, artist-in-residence and university organist, performed a “Bach to School” organ concert Sept. 6 in Memorial Chapel. Ebrecht performed major works composed for the organ in various styles during the 19th century by Marco Enrico Bossi, Cesar Franck, Franz Liszt and Felix Mendelssohn. The event kicked off the Center for the Arts’ Music Department Events for the 2013-14 academic year. View upcoming performances here.

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NEFA Supports Bharata Natyam Dancer at Navaratri Festival

The New England Foundation for the Arts (NEFA) National Dance Project presented Wesleyan’s Center for the Arts with a $4,500 grant on May 7. The grant will support a presentation and bharata natyam dance by Sannidhi Aparna Ramaswamy during the 2013 Navaratri Festival. Lead funding for this project comes from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.