Tag Archive for graduate student

PhD Candidate King Speaks about Nanomaterials at Graduate Speaker Series

Chemistry graduate student Melissa King presented a talk on “Synthesis of Shaped Nanoparticles with Bimetallic Surfaces via Iodide Facilitated Reduction of Palladium“ April 19 in Exley Science Center. Her talk concluded the 2016-17 Graduate Speaker Series.

Chemistry graduate student and PhD candidate Melissa King presented a talk on “Synthesis of Shaped Nanoparticles with Bimetallic Surfaces via Iodide Facilitated Reduction of Palladium “ April 19 in Exley Science Center. Her talk concluded the 2016-17 Graduate Speaker Series.

Bimetallic nanoparticles, King explained, may provide an exciting avenue toward the development of novel catalysts potentially useful in meeting the growing demand for energy.

Bimetallic nanoparticles, King explained, may provide an exciting avenue toward the development of novel catalysts potentially useful in meeting the growing demand for energy. (Photos by Will Barr ’18)

Faculty, Students, Alumnus Co-Author Paper in Biochemistry Journal

Wesleyan co-authors published a paper titled “The Stories Tryptophans Tell: Exploring Protein Dynamics of Heptosyltransferase I from Escherichia coli” in the January 2017 issue of Biochemistry.

The co-authors include chemistry graduate student Joy Cote; alumni Zarek Siegel ’16 and Daniel Czyzyk, PhD ’15; and faculty Erika Taylor, associate professor of chemistry; Ishita Mukerji, the Fisk Professor of Natural Science, professor of molecular biology and biochemistry.

Their paper investigates the intrinsic properties of Tryptophan amino acids found within the protein, Heptosyltransferase I, to understand the ways this protein moves during catalysis. Understanding the movement of this protein is an important step in developing its inhibitors.

When this protein is inactive, either because it was genetically altered or inhibited, hydrophobic antibiotics become more effective, so inhibitors could be useful in reactivating antibiotics that are current not effective against these bacteria.

While it is popularly believed that inhibiting a protein requires a compound to compete with the substrate, their paper argues that instead one can design a inhibitor to disrupt protein dynamics, preventing activity. The co-authors compare the function of this “protein dynamics disruptor” to a wedge holding open a door–once inserted, the inhibitor prevents the protein from performing its function.

Their research on Tryptophan residues also found that distant regions of the protein communicate whether or not they are binding their substrate to other regions.

“It would be like if your right hand knew that your left hand was holding a pencil just by the changes in the position of your left hand. We are currently pursuing computational studies to look for these motions via molecular dynamics experiments,” Taylor said.

Grad Student Khan to Perform with Berklee Indian Ensemble

Suhail Yusuf Khan

Suhail Yusuf Khan

Music graduate student Suhail Yusuf Khan will be a featured guest artist at the Berklee Indian Ensemble on May 9. In addition, he will conduct a master class on Hindustani music and the sarangi, one of the oldest string instruments featured in North Indian classical music. The sarangi is the only instrument in the world that can emulate all the nuances of the human voice. Played with a bow, this instrument has three main strings and 37 sympathetic strings.

Khan started to play the instrument when he was 7 years old. The grandson of the sarangi legend Ustad Sabri Khan, and nephew of sarangi genius Ustad Kamal Sabri, his professional career took off at age 11 when he played his first live concert in Liverpool, England. Khan is the first of his family to fuse ancient classical music from India with genres as varied as jazz, rock, electronic and Irish music. In 2014, he was named a Forbes India “30 Under 30.”

He also is a composer, singer and songwriter. After graduating from Wesleyan, Khan is considering applying to PhD programs in ethnomusicology or will continue to perform around the world.

Students Present Thesis Work at Biophysical Society Meeting

Three Wesleyan Molecular Biology and Biochemistry majors received the unique opportunity of presenting their thesis work at the 61st annual Biophysical Society meeting in New Orleans, Feb. 11-15.

Rachel Savage ’17 presented her senior honors thesis titled, “Investigation of the Melting Thermodynamics of a DNA 4-Way Junction: One Base at a Time,” which was done in collaboration with Francis Starr, professor of physics.

Rachel Savage ’17 presented her senior honors thesis titled, “Investigation of the Melting Thermodynamics of a DNA 4-Way Junction: One Base at a Time,” which was done in collaboration with Francis Starr, professor of physics.

Researchers’ Paper Selected as “Editor’s Choice” by American Chemical Society

jp-2016-11976k_0007Three faculty and one graduate student co-authored a paper titled “Statistical Coupling Analysis combined with all-atom Molecular Simulation Postulates Dynamical Allosterism in the MutS DNA Mismatch Repair Protein,” published in the March issue of the Journal of Physical Chemistry – Biophysics, published by The American Chemical Society.

The authors include David Beveridge, the Joshua Boger University Professor of the Sciences and Mathematics, professor of chemistry, professor of integrative sciences; Manju Hingorani, professor of molecular biology and biochemistry, professor of integrative sciences; Kelly Thayer, visiting assistant professor of computer science; and molecular biology and biochemistry graduate student Bharat Lakhani.

This project is part of Lakhani’s ’16 PhD thesis of Lakhani. Notably, the project brings together the experimental biochemistry of Hingorani’s research program, which specializes in DNA mismatch repair, and the computational biophysics in Beveridge’s Laboratory, which specializes in molecular dynamics simulations. All theoretical calculations were carried out using the Wesleyan High Performance Computer Cluster.

In addition, the article was selected as an ACS “Editor’s Choice,” an honor given to one article from the entire ACS portfolio of journals each day of the year. As a consequence, the authors have been invited to submit a 30-40 minute online presentation to “ACS LiveSlides,” which increases the exposure of the published work.

Graduate Student Hossain Speaks on Reverse Fault Geometry

On Feb. 8, John Hossain, a MA candidate from the Earth and Environmental Sciences Department, presented a talk on “The Role of Reverse Fault Geometry on Slip Rate Estimates” during the Graduate Speaker Series.

Estimates of fault slip rates are an integral part of assessing seismic hazard because they affect estimates of earthquake renewal and moment release rates. For some faults, however, slip rate estimates vary among geodetic studies or between geodetic and geologic investigations. In his talk, Hossain explained why by using a series of numerical models.

Graduate Speaker Series events are open to the entire Wesleyan community. (Photos by Rebecca Goldfarb Terry ’19)

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