Students

Students Honored with Academic Prizes, Fellowships, Scholarships

Trinity Russell’17 received the Walkley Prize for excellence in psychology; Mae Moskin ’19 received the Scott Prize for Arabic language; and Cheryl Hagan ’17 received the Spurrier Award for ethics.

During the annual student awards reception on May 10, Trinity Russell’17 received the Walkley Prize for excellence in psychology; Mae Moskin ’19 was honored with the Scott Prize for Arabic language; and Cheryl Hagan ’17 received the Spurrier Award for ethics.

Students who received academic prizes, fellowships and scholarships were honored at a reception May 10 in Daniel Family Commons.

Mira Klein ’17 received the White Fellowship for government and the Robert Schumann Distinguished Student Award. Joli Holmes ’17 received the Plukas Prize for economics and the Plukas Teaching Apprentice Award.

Mira Klein ’17 received the White Fellowship and the Robert Schumann Distinguished Student Award. Joli Holmes ’17 received the Plukas Prize for economics and the Plukas Teaching Apprentice Award.

Among the awardees were Mira Klein ’17, who received the White Fellowship for government and the Robert Schumann Distinguished Student Award for demonstrating academic accomplishment and excellence in environmental stewardship; Page Nelson ’17, who received the Alumni Prize in the History of Art; Eric Meyreles ’18, who received a Miller Summer Internship Grant to pursue an internship related to a potential business career; Ainsley Eakins ’18, who received the university’s Social Activist Award; Sofi Goode ’17, who is the recipient of the Wilde Prize for excellence in economics; and AJ Wilson ’19, who was honored with the Richard McLellan Prize for commitment to public service and diversity.

Student-Athletes Honored at 5th Annual Dinner, Awards Program

On May 4, the Department of Physical Education and Athletics hosted its fifth annual scholar-athlete dinner and awards program.

Rachel Aronow ’17 and Michael Liu ’17 were honored with the Roger Maynard Memorial Award.

Rachel Aronow ’17 and Michael Liu ’17 were honored with the Roger Maynard Memorial Award.

The 170 student-athletes in attendance distinguished themselves through both their outstanding work in the classroom and their accomplishment in athletic competition.

During the event, Mike Whalen ’83, director of athletics, served as master of ceremonies and presented the Maynard Awards; Wesleyan President Michael Roth ’78 provided comments from the administration; Dan Lynch ’80, P’11, P’14 presented the Athletic Advisory Council Award; Rob Harbison ’17 and Molly Schassberger ’17 spoke on behalf of the scholar-athletes; and alumnus John Driscoll ’62 led the Wesleyan Fight Song.

Rachel Aronow ’17 (women’s ice hockey and women’s lacrosse) and Michael Liu ’17 (men’s tennis) were honored with the Roger Maynard Memorial Award, which is presented annually to the Wesleyan male and female senior scholar-athlete who best exemplifies the spirit, accomplishments and humility of Roger Maynard ’37, a former Wesleyan trustee who lettered in cross country and track. He died March 30, 1968.

Mike Whalen and Dan Lynch present Alan Dachs, center, with the Athletic Advisory Council Award.

Mike Whalen and Dan Lynch present Alan Dachs, center, with the Athletic Advisory Council Award.

Alan Dachs ’70, Hon ’07, P’98 received the Athletic Advisory Council Award.

The following individuals and teams were recognized for academic and athletic achievement by a national organization:

Men’s Cross Country — U.S. Track and Field/Cross Country Coaches Association Division III All-Academic Team: Will Dudek ’17, Tate Knight ’18. As a team, Wesleyan qualified as an all-academic squad (3.396 GPA).

Women’s Cross Country — U.S. Track and Field/Cross Country Coaches Association Division III All-Academic Team: Caroline Elmendorf ’17, Rhoen Fiutak ’19, Julia Mitchell ’19, Molly Schassberger ’17. As a team, Wesleyan qualified as an all-academic squad (3.626 GPA).

Field Hockey — National Field Hockey Coaches Association Academic Squad (3.30 GPA or higher): Lily Ardente ’18, Rachel Curran ’20, Claire Edelman ’17, Emily Hart ’17, Brooke Hodgson ’18, Erica Horowitz ’20, Phoebe Howe ’18, Meghan Jain ’19, Colleen Lynch ’17, Leah Pensler ’20, Rachel Pomerantz ’20, Maddie Shea ’20, Claire Taub ’20, Abby Warren ’19, Alyssa Wood ’19, Delaney Wood ’20, Lauren Yu ’17. Scholars of Distinction: Emily Hart ’17, Erica Horowitz ’20. As a team, Wesleyan made the national academic team list (3.0 or higher GPA).

Men’s Squash — College Squash Association National Scholar Athletes: Alex Kamisher ’17, Grant Lounsbury ’17, Zach Roach ’17, David Sneed ’17.

Women’s Squash — College Squash Association National Scholar-Athletes: Annie Ferreira ’17, Tatum Leclair ’17.

Men’s Swimming and Diving — College Swimming Coaches Association of America Scholar All-America: As a team, Wesleyan qualified as a scholar All-America team, fall, 2016 (3.44 team GPA).

Women’s Swimming and Diving — College Swimming Coaches Association of America Scholar All-America: As a team, Wesleyan qualified as a scholar All-America team, fall, 2015 (3.53 team GPA).

Wrestling — National Wrestling Coaches Association Scholar All-America: Isaiah Bellamy ’18. As a team, Wesleyan ranked 15th as a scholar All-America team (3.23 GPA).

Photos of the dinner and awards ceremony are below: (Photos by Tom Dzimian)

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6 Students Awarded Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowships

The 2016-17 Mellon Mays fellows include, from left, Jumoke McDuffie-Thurmond '19; Brianna Thurman '19, Kaiyana Cervera ’19; Bisa McDuffie-Thurmond '19, Azher Jaweed’19 and Brenda Quintana’18 (not pictured). Demetrius Eudell, pictured at far right, is the Mellon Mays faculty coordinator.

The 2017-18 Mellon Mays fellows include, from left, Jumoke McDuffie-Thurmond ’19; Brianna Thurman ’19, Kaiyana Cervera ’19; Bisa McDuffie-Thurmond ’19, Azher Jaweed’19 and Brenda Quintana’18 (not pictured). Demetrius Eudell, pictured at far right, is the Mellon Mays faculty coordinator.

This spring, Wesleyan has awarded six Wesleyan students with a Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship. The fellowship is the centerpiece of the Andrew Mellon Foundation’s initiatives to increase the presence of traditionally underrepresented groups in the faculty ranks of institutions of higher learning in the U.S.

Fellows participate in the program during the last two years of undergraduate study and receive a monthly stipend to offset work study requirements, modest research funds, and additional summer research funding as part of the fellowship. Upon successful completion of graduate study, Mellon Mays Fellows also receive up to $10,000 to assist in repayment of student loans.

The 2016-17 Mellon Mays fellows include Jumoke McDuffie-Thurmond ’19; Brianna Thurman ’19, Kaiyana Cervera ’19; Bisa McDuffie-Thurmond ’19, Azher Jaweed’19 and Brenda Quintana’18. Demetrius Eudell, professor of history, serves as faculty coordinator and Teshia Levy-Grant, dean for equity and inclusion, is staff coordinator. 

French Students Offer a Glimpse of Wesleyan’s History

Students from Wesleyan’s French 325 class Museums, Objects and Empire, recently presented a pop-up exhibition on the history that surrounds Wesleyan’s former museum that once occupied Judd Hall from 1871 to 1957.

Students from Wesleyan’s French 325 class Museums, Objects and Empire, recently presented an exhibit on the history that surrounds Wesleyan’s former museum that once occupied Judd Hall from 1871 to 1957. Included was information on the Wesleyan’s missionary past; history on Javanese gamelan and ethnomusicology at Wesleyan; and a mummy, acquired by Wesleyan in the 1880s.

Wesleyan Media Project Researchers Write About What Americans Will Really Dislike about ‘Trumpcare’

Researchers affiliated with the Wesleyan Media Project wrote in The Washington Post on May 5 on what “Americans will really dislike about the House ‘Trumpcare’ bill.” The article, authored by Associate Professor of Government Erika Franklin Fowler, Courtney Laermer ’17, Wesleyan Media Project Project Manager Laura Baum, and Sarah Gollust ’01, is based on data from Laermer’s senior thesis.

House Republicans voted on May 4 to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) with their alternative plan, the American Health Care Act (AHCA). The authors argue that this vote is likely to cause headaches for Republicans due to several unpopular changes it makes to the law. They focus, in particular, on the AHCA’s replacement for the individual mandate (unpopular itself with only 35 percent public approval) with a “continuous coverage requirement.” As they explain:

If you let your health insurance coverage lapse for more than 63 days, you would have to pay a 30 percent late-enrollment surcharge on top of the premium for the next year. (The bill passed with two amendments affecting these penalties. The widely debated MacArthur amendment lets states seek waivers to enable insurers to charge higher premiums to people with preexisting conditions who fall into this coverage gap. The late-breaking Upton amendment added Wednesday provides $8 billion in funds to offset some of these higher penalties for waiver states, but most analysts don’t think it’s enough).

The researchers surveyed nearly 1,600 Americans in mid-March during the debate over the first version of the AHCA. Here’s what they found:

As much as citizens don’t like the requirement to purchase insurance or pay a penalty to the government, our evidence suggests that they dislike the AHCA’s penalty paid to insurers even more.

In short, AHCA opponents and potential challengers to House Republicans can choose from among many lines of attack: the public is already concerned about protections for people with preexisting conditions, huge cuts to the Medicaid program, and citizens losing insurance. Highlighting the AHCA’s coverage-gap penalty could drop public support further.

Doggo Meet and Greet Helps Students De-stress before Finals

Doggo Meet and Greet, April 29 at Wesleyan University.

Cloie Logan ’17 and Eliana Zimmerman ’17 snuggle Fika, a Danish Swedish Farmdog, at the Doggo Meet and Greet, April 29.

April 29 was a dog-gone good day for more than 150 students and 13 dogs as they gathered together at the Center for the Arts Green for a Doggo Meet and Greet.

Sara Dean ’17, a self-proclaimed “dog lover,” created the event and advertised it on Facebook. She invited Wesleyan students, staff and faculty to bring their pooches to campus.

“It hit me that there are a lot of students with emotional support dogs on campus,

2017 McNair Fellows Present Research Projects in Senior Talks

The Senior McNair Fellows who spoke on April 18 are part of the cohort of 10 who are presenting their undergraduate research projects this year. From left to right: Nicholas Morgan ’17 (majoring in economics), Stacy Uchendu (majoring in chemistry), Hanna Morales Hernandez (majoring in chemistry) , and Cindy Flores (majoring in earth and environmental science).

The Senior McNair Fellows who spoke on April 18 are part of the cohort of 10 who are presenting their undergraduate research projects this year. From left to right: Nicholas Morgan ’17 (majoring in economics), Stacy Uchendu (majoring in chemistry), Hanna Morales Hernandez (majoring in chemistry) , and Cindy Flores (majoring in earth and environmental science).

This spring, the 10 McNair Fellows of the Wesleyan Class of  2017 are presenting their undergraduate research projects at Senior Talks on Thursdays at noon from April 18 through May 4, in Allbritton 311. The presentations describe the research that students have conducted with Wesleyan faculty mentors. Many of these projects also are the subject of student theses or final papers presented for the Wesleyan BA requirements.

The Wesleyan University Ronald E. McNair Post Baccalaureate Achievement Program, established in 2007, assists students from underrepresented groups with preparing for, entering, and progressing successfully through postgraduate education by providing guidance, research opportunities, and academic and financial support to students planning to pursue PhDs. Junior and Senior Fellows do research with faculty mentors and participate in

102 Students Present Research at Psychology Poster Session

The Psychology Department hosted a research poster presentation April 27 in Beckham Hall. More than 102 students presented 46 posters.

The Psychology Department hosted a research poster presentation April 27 in Beckham Hall. One-hundred-and-two students presented 46 posters, 12 more than last year.

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Tima Zeng ’17 presented her research titled “Increased Structural and Functional Connectivity in Jazz Musicians.” Zeng’s advisor is Psyche Loui, assistant professor of psychology, assistant professor of neuroscience and behavior.

Students Inducted into Honor Society, Win Awards At American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Julianne Riggs in Chicago last month, where she attended the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology meeting.

Julianne Riggs ’17 in Chicago last month, where she attended the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology meeting.

Five Wesleyan seniors were inducted into the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology honor society at the ASBMB annual meeting in Chicago, April 22-26. They are: Jennifer Cascino ’17, Kaileen Fei ’17, Julianne Riggs ’17, Rachel Savage ’17 and Stacy Uchendu ’17.

The ASBMB Honor Society recognizes exceptional undergraduate juniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in the molecular life sciences for their scholarly achievement, research accomplishments, and outreach activities. The mission of the society is to advance the science of biochemistry and molecular biology through organization of scientific meetings, advocacy for funding of basic research and education, support of science education at all levels, promotion of the diversity of individuals entering the scientific workforce, and publication of a number of scientific and educational journals, including the Journal of Biological Chemistry and the Journal of Lipid Research.

Bios of all the inductees, in alphabetical order, can be found here.

Riggs attended the meeting, where she took part in the induction ceremony and presented her research.

“Overall, it was a great experience. I got to present in the undergraduate poster competition and won honorable mention for best chromatin and gene expression poster. I also presented my poster to the general meeting,” she said. “It was a huge conference and there was so much going on. It was great to talk to people of all levels of science, get their perspectives on what it takes to be a scientist, and hear them passionately discuss their research projects. It was also wonderful to talk to people who were researching similar topics to mine, and get their advice and validation on my work.”

In addition, two students, Christine Little ’18 and Cody Hecht ’18, received ASBMB research awards. The $1,000 awards will support their research over the summer.

Wesleyan Celebrates Completion of Science Theses with Poster Session

Wesleyan’s Natural Sciences and Mathematics Division recently hosted a Celebration of Science Theses, a poster session featuring the work of Honors and MA students in the NSM fields. Organized by Manju Hingorani, professor of molecular biology and biochemistry; Barbara Juhasz, associate professor of psychology and neuroscience and behavior; and Seth Redfield, associate professor of astronomy, the event took place in Exley Science Center on April 21, where students from a wide range of disciplines proudly presented their work, marking the culmination of their thesis.

Wesleyan’s Natural Sciences and Mathematics Division recently hosted a Celebration of Science Theses, a poster session featuring the work of Honors and MA students in the NSM fields. Organized by Manju Hingorani, professor of molecular biology and biochemistry; Barbara Juhasz, associate professor of psychology and neuroscience and behavior; and Seth Redfield, associate professor of astronomy, the event took place in Exley Science Center on April 21, where students from a wide range of disciplines proudly presented their work, marking the culmination of their thesis.

Garver ’20 Trains in Air Force ROTC

Dalton Garver '20 participates in the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) at Yale University.

Dalton Garver ’20 participates in the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) at Yale University. He juggles football, academics and ROTC by having a set schedule for each day that allots time for reading, studying, working out, and practices.

Every Thursday morning, beginning at 6 a.m., Dalton Garver ’20 finds himself at Yale University engaged in physical training—ranging from weightlifting to running to core circuits. This is followed by marching practice, a review of Warrior Knowledge, and, on occasion, lectures from guest speakers about the Armed Services.

Garver, of Fresno, Calif., is believed to be the first Wesleyan student to participate in the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) at Yale. He joined this semester, but first decided to do ROTC as a junior in high school after talking to his brother’s friend about his own experience in the Army ROTC at Fresno State.

“I joined because I have always wanted to be a lawyer as well as serve our country,” said Garver, who plans to major in psychology. “I felt becoming a JAG (Judge Advocate General) for the Air Force would be a great way to do so.”