Tag Archive for Class of 2016

Men’s Basketball Davis ’16 Reaches 1,000-Point Milestone

B.J. Davis '16

B.J. Davis ’16

B.J. Davis ’16, a guard on the men’s basketball team, scored his 1,000th career point as the 25th-ranked Wesleyan Cardinals used a second half rally to defeat the Connecticut College Camels in NESCAC play Jan. 30, 87-79.

Wesleyan trailed the entire first half but outscored the Camels, 53-37 in the final 20 minutes of regulation to earn its fourth-consecutive win.

With 13 points, four fouls and just :43 remaining on the clock, Davis went to the foul line. He missed his first shot but hit the second to etch his name in the Wesleyan record books as he finished with 14 points on the day.

More Cardinal Athletics news can be found on this website.

(Information provided by Mike O’Brien, sports information director)

Environmental Geochemistry Students Present Research

Students in an Environmental Chemistry class presented their research about Lake Hayward on Dec. 2. From left to right: Zachary Kaufman '16, Nicole DelGaudio '18, Hannah New '16 and Jesse Tarnas '16.

Students in an Environmental Geochemistry class presented their research about Lake Hayward on Dec. 2. From left to right: Zachary Kaufman ’16, Nicole DelGaudio ’18, Hannah New ’16 and Jesse Tarnas ’16.

Students from Associate Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences Timothy Ku’s Environmental Geochemistry class presented their findings regarding the geochemical makeup of Lake Hayward in East Haddam, Conn., to almost two dozen members of the Lake Hayward and Wesleyan communities on Dec. 2 in a presentation at the Russell House. The class is part of Wesleyan’s Service Learning Program spearheaded by Rob Rosenthal, director of Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life, the John E. Andrus Professor of Sociology.

“Working in science, it’s always fulfilling when you have people who care about the information you’re looking at,” said Zachary Kaufman ‘16.

Students did fieldwork on Lake Hayward in East Haddam, Conn.

Students conducted their fieldwork on Lake Hayward in East Haddam, Conn.

During the project, students collected samples and conducted lab work to analyze the lake’s eutrophication, or the process by which bodies of water are made more well-nourished and nutrient rich. While the process occurs naturally in all lakes, human activity can expedite the occurrence and cause ecological impacts and a rise in fish mortality, among other things. Students’ findings showed that there is nothing concerning about Lake Hayward’s current geochemical makeup.

“The students were enthusiastic and engaged,” said Randy Miller, a member of the Lake Hayward community who worked with students and attended the event. “We would do this again in a heartbeat.” (Photos below by Hannah Norman ’16)

Timothy Ku, associate professor of Earth and Environmental Science, introduces the class research.

Timothy Ku, associate professor of Earth and Environmental Science, introduces the class research.

More than a dozen members of the Lake Hayward  and Wesleyan communities watched the presentations.

Almost two dozen members of the Lake Hayward and Wesleyan communities watched the presentations.

Students presented their findings on the water chemistry of Lake Hayward. Left to right: Robert Ramos '16, Rebecca, and Lydia Tierney '16.

Students presented their findings on the water chemistry of Lake Hayward. Left to right: Robert Ramos ’16, Rebecca, and Lydia Tierney ’16.

Pilot Program Gives Students Insight into Local Nonprofits

Wesleyan Nonprofit Board Residency Program

Members of the Center for Community Partnerships’ new Nonprofit Board Residency Program. From left to right: Joe Samolis (Middlesex Historical Society), Ben Romero ’16, Patrick McKenna (rear, Middlesex Habitat for Humanity), Liza Bayless ’16, Jennifer Roach (Wesleyan Civic Engagement Fellow), Kevin Whilhelm (rear, Middlesex United Way), Sarah Bird (Middlesex Habitat for Humanity), Nancy Fischbach (Community Foundation of Middlesex County), Cynthia Clegg (Community Foundation of Middlesex County), Cathy Lechowicz (Center for Community Partnerships), Diana Martinez (Wesleyan Center for Community Partnerships), Arpita Vora ’16, Makaela Kingsley (Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship), John Bassinger (NEAR, Buttonwood Tree), and Bria Grant ’17. Missing: Aidan Martinez ’17. (Photo by Lu Imbriano ’18)

Arpita Vora ’16 clicks through a website that seeks to raise awareness about the hardships faced by low-income families in North Carolina. Middlesex United Way, the organization at which Vora was placed through the Center for Community Partnerships’ yearlong pilot Nonprofit Board Residency Program, is hoping to create a similar site using data from Connecticut.

E&ES Faculty, Students Contribute to GSA Annual Meeting

 

uzanne O’Connell, professor of earth and environmental sciences and faculty director of the McNair Program,  with Kate Cullen '16.

Suzanne O’Connell, professor of earth and environmental sciences and faculty director of the McNair Program, with Kate Cullen ’16.

Wesleyan Earth and Environmental Sciences students and faculty attended and contributed to this year’s Geological Society of America (GSA) Annual Meeting, held Nov. 1–4 in Baltimore, Md.

Wesleyan Refugee Project Aids Refugees from around the World

Cole Phillips ’16, center, and Sophie Zinser ’16, right, volunteer every week at Integrated Refugee and Immigrant Services (IRIS) in New Haven, helping refugees apply for housing and energy subsidy programs. Here, they are pictured with Ramez al-Darwish, a Syrian refugee from Homs.

Cole Phillips ’16, center, and Sophie Zinser ’16, right, volunteer every week at Integrated Refugee and Immigrant Services (IRIS) in New Haven, helping refugees apply for housing and energy subsidy programs. Here, they are pictured with Ramez al-Darwish, a Syrian refugee from Homs.

The world is currently facing the largest refugee crisis since World War II. Concerned Wesleyan students are volunteering with community organizations, coordinating various speaker panels, fundraising for international NGOs and agencies, and engaging in advocacy efforts.

This fall, Casey Smith ’17 and Cole Phillips ’16 founded the Wesleyan Refugee Project (WRP). Smith, a College of Social Studies major who is pursuing certificates in Middle Eastern studies and international relations, has worked with refugees since high school, advocated for refugees’ rights in Washington, D.C., and volunteered for refugee resettlement organizations. She is currently studying abroad in Jordan, where she helps refugees access legal services with the International Refugee Assistance Project (IRAP) and teaches yoga at the Collateral Repair Project (CRP). Phillips is a government major pursuing certificates in Middle Eastern studies and international relations. While studying abroad in Jordan, he worked for CRP, an NGO that provides aid to Syrian and Iraqi refugees. Phillips then returned to Jordan in August via a Davenport grant to conduct research for his thesis, and grew close with a Syrian refugee with whom he worked as an interpreter. These experiences inspired Smith and Phillips to engage the Wesleyan community in refugee aid work.

“More broadly, we also wanted to start conversations and bring awareness about refugee issues to campus,” said Smith.

Currently, there are 34 Wesleyan students volunteering through WRP, and many more have expressed interest. Every week, student volunteers work with three different organizations: Integrated Refugee and Immigrant Services (IRIS), helping refugees apply for housing and energy subsidy programs; the International Refugee Assistance Project (IRAP), working on refugees’ resettlement applications; and Paper Airplanes, tutoring Syrian refugees in English.

Student Artists, Bands Record Music at Red Feather Studios

Red Feather Studios head engineer Mikah Feldman-Stein '16 is one of the studio's founding members. 

Red Feather Studios head engineer Mikah Feldman-Stein ’16 is one of the studio’s founding members. Red Feather Studios has been responsible for the production of multiple EPs and dozens of songs.

The basement of the University Organizing Center at 190 High Street is now home to Red Feather Studios, Wesleyan’s first and only student-run recording studio.

Red Feather officially opened in spring 2015 after being a work in progress for a few years.

Oscar Parajon '16 at Red Feather Studios.

Oscar Parajon ’16 at Red Feather Studios.

“The music culture at Wesleyan is unlike any I’ve seen at other universities,” added Oscar Parajon ’16, a founding member and head studio manager at Red Feather, who is majoring in American Studies. “Before Red Feather Studios, what was happening was a plethora of ‘bedroom producers’ throughout campus that did not have a platform to make their art.”

According to Parajon, the studio’s name comes from the Wesleyan cardinal mascot, “and the idea that its red feathers have the potential to lift the cardinal to extraordinary heights.”

“I think the need for Red Feather stemmed from a discrepancy between Wesleyan students’ creative output and our collective access to creative resources on campus,” said Derrick Holman ’16, another founding member and head of external affairs. While other colleges and universities have student-run studios, Holman said that Red Feather is unique in being a completely student-run venture, with everything from the idea to the funding to the construction to the day-to-day operations under student control.

Derek Holman in the studio.

Derek Holman ’16 in the studio.

“In my personal experience, I have found that there is so much value in creative freedom and—unlike any other musical space on campus—Red Feather provides its leadership and users with the ability to experiment in an unconstrained manner, not only musically, but also with the process of developing and managing a creative space,” Holman, a sociology major, said.

In its first semester of operation, the studio was booked for upwards of 175 sessions, during which artists, bands and performers logged more than 500 hours of recording, production and musical output, according to Holman.

“So far the response has been amazing,” he added. “To date, we have been responsible for the production of multiple EPs and dozens of songs, and even have a member whose self-produced album is now available for purchase on iTunes that was completed almost entirely in our facilities.

‘Where We Live’ Features Wesleyan CPE, Doula Project

Two members of the Wesleyan community participated in a discussion on WNPR’s Where We Live focused on “Confronting Social Injustice.”

Bashaun Brown, a former student at Wesleyan’s Center for Prison Education who spent more than six years incarcerated at Cheshire Correctional Institution, is now pursuing an entrepreneurial venture called TRAP House.

“All prison experience is pretty bad, but thanks to Wesleyan, I was able to transform my prison space. My prison experience was one of educating myself, and trying to get better and make sure I never make the types of mistakes that I made to get into that situation in the first place. Wesleyan Center for Prison Education allowed me to imagine I was in a college setting throughout four years of my prison sentence,” he said.

There are not many programs available to help inmates work through the issues that got them incarcerated, Brown explained, and the time is wasted for many people. People who run prisons are primarily concerned with safety and security.

“In reality, if you really want to change the people in prison, you focus more on bringing more programming to prison. I think everybody should be able to get the opportunity that I had to take part in a quality, in this case liberal arts, education. If anyone wants to make the case for liberal arts, it should be in the prison,” he said. “Getting a liberal arts education allowed me to really evaluate where I’m at politically, socially, economically on the spectrum. Exactly where do I stand as a black man in America, now as a felon in America? How did we get here, and what can I do to change the situation? There’s something valuable to learning psychology, literature, and mixing and matching all types of education to custom make your experience.”

Later in the show, Hannah Sokoloff-Rubin ’16 discussed the Wesleyan Doula Project, a social entrepreneurship venture that she co-leads.

“The Wesleyan Doula Project is an organization that trains students and a few community members to work as non-medical support people for women receiving abortions,” she explained. There’s a common misperception that doulas only support women going through birth, but the Wesleyan Doula Project is part of a new movement to support women across the “full spectrum” of pregnancy outcomes, from miscarriage to stillbirth to adoption.

“One of the reasons I’ve devoted all of my time as a student to this project is become I think it both hits a level of social justice that’s really important…and helps fix a broken healthcare system, especially around reproductive healthcare, in that we have a problem where the care that is being provided really isn’t meeting the needs of the people who are receiving it.” The Wesleyan Doula Project helps to increase patient safety, open lines of communication, and make the process go more smoothly, she said.

Senior Thesis Writers Discuss Research with Wesleyan Community

On Nov. 6, four Wesleyan seniors spoke to members of the Wesleyan community about their thesis topics and research. The event, “Celebrating Seniors: Research Excellence at Wesleyan and Abroad” took place in Judd Hall, and was moderated by the Class of 2016 Dean David Phillips.

The student presenters were Tahreem Khalied ’16, Claire Wright ’16, Simon Chen ’16 and Kate Cullen ’16, and their projects varied widely. (Story by Margaret Curtis ’16, photos by Rebecca Goldfarb Terry ’19)

Tahreem Khalied, who moved to the United States from Pakistan four years ago, transferred to Wesleyan for her sophomore year and decided to declare the American studies major. Khalied initially thought that writing a thesis was not for her, but was encouraged by the freedom that the American Studies Department offered and soon changed her mind. She decided to write a novel based on her experience reconciling her identity as an immigrant and as an American, and including the background in critical social theory she acquired through the American studies major. The novel’s title is Just the Right Amount of American, and Khalied jokes that she is the protagonist.

Tahreem Khalied, who moved to the United States from Pakistan four years ago, transferred to Wesleyan for her sophomore year and decided to declare the American studies major. Khalied initially thought that writing a thesis was not for her, but was encouraged by the freedom that the American Studies Department offered and soon changed her mind. She decided to write a novel based on her experience reconciling her identity as an immigrant and as an American, and including the background in critical social theory she acquired through the American studies major. The novel’s title is Just the Right Amount of American, and Khalied jokes that she is the protagonist.

Claire Wright, a College of Letters, French and psychology tripled major, on the other hand, knew since her freshman year that she would write a thesis – she just did not know what it would be about. She found her topic when the MINDS Foundation, a foundation founded by recent Wesleyan graduates that brings mental health care to rural India, asked her to study the effect of using a Western diagnostic of PTSD to treat survivors of sexual violence in rural India. Wright, who had been working with MINDS since the summer after her sophomore year, thought this was a perfect idea for a senior thesis, and jokingly told the organization that she’d “get back to them in a year.” Since then she has been studying how PTSD manifests, how dynamic nominalism affects the way symptoms come about, and feminist and post-colonial perspectives of aid-work.

Claire Wright, a College of Letters, French and psychology triple major, on the other hand, knew since her freshman year that she would write a thesis – she just did not know what it would be about. She found her topic when the MINDS Foundation, a foundation founded by recent Wesleyan graduates that brings mental health care to rural India, asked her to study the effect of using a Western diagnostic of PTSD to treat survivors of sexual violence in rural India. Wright, who had been working with MINDS since the summer after her sophomore year, thought this was a perfect idea for a senior thesis, and jokingly told the organization that she’d “get back to them in a year.” Since then she has been studying how PTSD manifests, how dynamic nominalism affects the way symptoms come about, and feminist and post-colonial perspectives of aid-work.

Simon Chen’s focus is on a completely other part of the world. He is combining his interests as an East Asian studies and economics major to ask how specific patterns of urban planning in China are prolonging environmental problems and misuse of resources. While American cities become increasingly less urban as one leaves the city center, Chen pointed to the popular model of urban sprawl and in China, and the mass environmental resources it takes up.

Simon Chen’s focus is on a completely other part of the world. He is combining his interests as an East Asian studies and economics major to ask how specific patterns of urban planning in China are prolonging environmental problems and misuse of resources. While American cities become increasingly less urban as one leaves the city center, Chen pointed to the popular model of urban sprawl and in China, and the mass environmental resources it takes up.

Loui, Jung ’16, Alumni Authors of Article in Frontiers in Psychology

Psyche Loui

Psyche Loui

Psyche Loui, assistant professor of psychology, assistant professor of neuroscience and behavior, assistant professor of integrated sciences, is the co-author of a new study, “Rhythmic Effects of Syntax Processing in Music and Language” published in Frontiers in Psychology in November. The article’s lead author is Harim Jung ’16, and it is also co-authored by Samuel Sontag ’14 and YeBin “Shiny” Park ’15.

According to Loui, the paper grew out of her Advanced Research Methods in Auditory Cognitive Neuroscience course, and is the precursor to Jung’s senior and master’s theses. The study uses a behavioral test to look into how music and language—two universal human functions—may overlap in their use of brain resources. The researchers show that perturbations in rhythm take up sufficient attentional resources to interfere with how people read and understand a sentence. The results support the view that rhythm, music, and language are not limited to their separate processing in the auditory circuits; instead, their structure creates expectations about tempo, harmony, and sentence meaning that interfere with each other in other sensory systems, such as vision, and in higher levels of cognitive processing.

“We think that the role of rhythm in this sharing of brain resources dedicated to music and language is an important finding because it could help people who use music as a therapy to help their language functions,” explained Loui. “For example, people who have aphasia (loss of language) due to stroke are sometimes able to sing, a fascinating paradox that led to the development of Melodic Intonation Therapy—a singing therapy designed to help aphasics recover their language functions. Rhythm is important for this therapy, but its precise role is unclear. By studying how rhythm guides the way the brain shares its processing between music and language, we might be better able to target Melodic Intonation Therapy in the future.”

Lipton Galbraith ’16 Attends Confronting Inequality Conference at U.S. Military Academy

Lipton Galbraith '16 toured the West Point campus with two cadets who facilitated his discussion group.

Gabe Lipton Galbraith ’16, center, recently participated in the 67th annual Student Conference on United States Affairs at the United States Military Academy at West Point. During the conference, Lipton Galbraith toured the campus with two cadets who facilitated his discussion group. He’s pictured here at Trophy Point.

From Nov. 4-7, Gabriel Lipton Galbraith ’16 participated in the 67th annual Student Conference on United States Affairs (SCUSA) at the United States Military Academy at West Point.

The conference, titled “Confronting Inequality: Wealth, Rights and Power” brought together students, scholars and members of the military to talk about pressing challenges currently facing U.S. policy makers.

Student delegates were split into roundtables to discuss specific topics touching on this broader theme. Lipton Galbraith’s roundtable focused on international trade and inequality. Over the four day conference they authored a position paper focusing on the possible consequences of the recently signed Transpacific Partnership (TPP) on inequality.

Lipton Galbraith, who is majoring in government and minoring in economics, is interested in international relations, international economics and law. He’s currently writing a senior thesis on government surveillance policy in North America and Western Europe.

“The SCUSA conference definitely enabled me to explore my academic interests, as well as get a sense of the various avenues of public service that are available to new graduates,” he said.

Lipton Galbraith '16 participated in a small panel group that focused on international trade and economic inequality.

Gabe Lipton Galbraith ’16 participated in a small panel group that focused on international trade and economic inequality.

In addition to the time spent in the roundtable discussion, Lipton Galbraith attended a number of talks from subject matter experts on the implications of inequality in the 21st century. The opening panel discussion brought together policymakers from the military, U.S. AID, the U.N. Population Fund (UNPFA), among others. Former United States Secretary of State Madeline Albright delivered the keynote address.

Lipton Galbraith also spoke with representatives working at the State Department, major human rights organizations, and numerous think tanks.

“All in all, the conference was a wonderful opportunity to converse with scholars of all sorts and to better understand the goals of the military.”

The Student Conference on United States Affairs brought together students, scholars and members of the military to talk about pressing challenges currently facing U.S. policy makers.

The Student Conference on United States Affairs brought together students, scholars and members of the military to talk about pressing challenges currently facing U.S. policymakers.