Tag Archive for reunion and commencement 2019

President Emeritus Bennet ’59, P’87, ’94, Hon. ’94, Remembered at Memorial Chapel Service

After President Bennet’s memorial service on May 25, 2019, Joe Fins ’82, MD, captured this image, which he thought represented three important areas of commitment in Bennet’s life. (Photo by Joseph J. Fins ’82, MD)

On the Saturday of Reunion & Commencement Weekend, May 25, 2019, the family of President Emeritus Douglas J. Bennet Jr. ’59, P’87, ’94, Hon. ’94 welcomed extended family and a host of friends from the Class of ’59 and other alumni, as well as Wesleyan faculty and staff to gather in Memorial Chapel to remember the life of their husband, father, brother, and grandfather. Bennet died on June 10, 2018, at the age of 79, which was noted in Wesleyan magazine last summer. As this was the Reunion year for his class, the setting provided an opportunity for those who had known him 64 years ago, as a Wesleyan first-year student, to assemble with his family in the chapel, where they had installed a plaque to their “classmate, friend, inspired leader of the College on the Hill“ on the occasion of their 60th Reunion.

Bennet, whose distinguished career prior to the Wesleyan presidency had included service as assistant secretary of state for international organization affairs under President Clinton, chief executive officer and president of National Public Radio, and head of the U.S. Agency for International Development, was noted for his commitment to public service. He was also known for his dedication to family and his love for sailing. All three facets were well represented in Saturday’s program.

Speakers at the service included President Michael Roth ’78; Alan Dachs ’70, P’98, Hon. ’07, who had chaired Wesleyan’s Board of Trustees during a segment of Bennet’s presidency; Bennet’s brother John; and his son Michael ’87, Hon. ’12, who offered remembrances on behalf of his siblings, Holly ’94 and James, as well. Dachs noted that Bennet “took joy in working for the greater good. He had ambition for Wesleyan, not himself. We could, and would, follow him with confidence and a sense of purpose.” The Wesleyan Spirits provided their a cappella “Amazing Grace,” and four of Bennet’s grandchildren delivered a poem by Philip Booth: “Chart 1203: Penobscot Bay and Approaches.”

Wesleyan Awards 763 BA Degrees at 187th Commencement


Graduates, their families, and other members of the Wesleyan community gathered on Andrus Field for the 187th Commencement ceremony on warm, sunny Sunday, May 26. Wesleyan conferred 763 bachelor of arts degrees; 44 master of arts degrees; 22 master of arts in liberal studies degrees; and 11 doctor of philosophy degrees. (Watch the entire Commencement ceremony online here.)

Saidiya Hartman ’84, professor of English and comparative literature and women’s and gender studies at Columbia University, delivered the Commencement address

Carby, Hartman ’84, Sanders II ’69 Receive Honorary Degrees

Wesleyan President Michael Roth ’78 and Board of Trustees Chair Donna Morea congratulate honorary degree recipients Saidiya Hartman ’84, Hazel Carby, and Edwin Sanders II ’69 at Wesleyan's 187th Commencement.

Wesleyan President Michael Roth ’78, third from right, congratulated honorary degree recipients Hazel Carby, Edwin Sanders II ’69, and Saidiya Hartman ’84 at Wesleyan’s 187th Commencement. (Photo by Olivia Drake)

At the University’s 187th Commencement on May 26, which coincided with the 50th anniversary of the historic Vanguard Class of 1969 and the founding of the African American Studies program at Wesleyan, Wesleyan presented three honorary degrees to Saidiya Hartman ’84, Hazel Carby, and Edwin Sanders II ’69.

Hartman, a groundbreaking scholar and cultural historian, also delivered this year’s Commencement address.

“I am proud to note that all three recipients have deep Wesleyan roots and distinguished careers dedicated to better understanding and improving the lives of African Americans through scholarship, creativity, and service,” Roth wrote in a campus-wide email. “They helped establish and expand African American Studies at Wesleyan, which our faculty voted to award full department status this past fall as a means of carrying forward this important work.”

Hazel V. Carby, who taught English at Wesleyan from 1982 to 1989, is the Charles C. and Dorothea S. Dilley Professor of African American Studies, professor of American Studies, and director of the Initiative on Race, Gender and Globalization at Yale University. She is a leading scholar on issues of race, gender, and ethnicity.

Saidiya Hartman ’84 Delivers 2019 Commencement Address

Saidiya Hartman

Saidiya Hartman ’84 gave the Commencement address during Wesleyan’s 187th Commencement ceremony on May 26.

Saidiya Hartman ’84 and Wesleyan President Michael Roth

Saidiya Hartman ’84 and Wesleyan President Michael Roth

Saidiya Hartman ’84, professor of English and comparative literature and women’s and gender studies at Columbia University, delivered the 2019 Commencement address on May 26.

A prize-winning author and 2018 Guggenheim Fellow, Hartman is renowned for her creative combinations of historical research, critical theory, and fictional narrative in exploring “the afterlife of slavery” and its negative effects on the life chances of black Americans. Her essays on film, photography, and feminism have been widely anthologized. During the ceremony, Hartman was named an Honorary Doctor of Letters for “shining a light on those whose histories have been erased and for . . . ‘crafting a love letter to all those who have been harmed.’”

Her Commencement address follows:

To the Class of 2019, to your parents to your professors . . . I congratulate you.

The commencement address, like the wedding toast or the eulogy, is a form of ritualized speech that marks a point of transition. It has its own stringent requirements and imposes its form. The speaker congratulates you for what you have done, acknowledges that you are special, avoids the uncomfortable facts and the ugly truths that have made it possible for you to sit on this lawn in your robes presenting a curated and lovely picture of what might be possible.

And I, the speaker, in acknowledgment and confirmation of this set of arrangements, the privileges and the inequalities which have allowed you to assume your seats and which have permitted me to command the stage for remarks that are not to exceed the allotted 10 minutes and directed to move, sway, inspire, confer recognition and enable all of us assembled to believe—at least for a moment—in the essential rightness of things, or at minimum to take pleasure in this moment to celebrate the day.

One is encouraged to read in this success—graduation from one of the best colleges in the U.S.—the prophetic signs of future greatness. Or one could offer admonitions about responsibilities and duty and remind you of the perilous state of the world, describe its routine and extraordinary brutalities, and the man-made disaster and everyday devastation of life on a damaged planet. Don’t worry. I don’t intend to do this, although it would meet the requirements of the genre.

You, the graduates, might listen attentively or distractedly—drifting in and out—because you are fully aware of exactly the kind of world you are stepping into and in all likelihood are as anxious as you are excited about this transition, this leave-taking from school and the parental home, this culmination that announces to you and the world your adulthood, your independence, your preparedness to do something to find your place. I won’t pretend to make any of this easier by telling you how to find happiness, or be all you can be, or advise you to practice random acts of kindness, or to live frugally and minimize your carbon footprint, or to be mindful of the damage you might do, the kind of harm that privilege affords. I will try to avoid clichés when and where possible, although be forewarned I might slip up and say something about making the world we want now or suggest the future is in your hands even as the future has been mortgaged, even as we are living at the end of the world.

I have tried to avoid saying such things or assuming the posture of wise counsel because I know you have spent the last four years dedicated to rigorous study, dedicated to developing and honing the intellect and to nurturing creativity. I know that you have studied with the best minds and encountered the great thinkers and visionaries in your seminars and exchanged and debated ideas with those students. This has prepared you for engaging and reckoning with the matters of the world.

I still remember the questions I grappled with in my seminars at Wesleyan. Is history a process not determined by human actors or a consciousness? Is there a fundamental relation between slavery and democracy? What are the responsibilities of the writer? What is the role of the organic intellectual in fomenting change? How is culture a radical tool for reconstruction? Is it possible to untether freedom from the history of slavery that secured it? Such questions changed me and I have spent the rest of my life wrestling with them.

What I understand about the world and how I imagine my place in it, has much to do with what I learned here. With my relationships with brilliant teachers like Hazel Carby, Judith Butler, Gayatri Spivak, Bill Lowe, Robert O’Meally, Richard Slotkin, and Annie Dillard. On the 50th anniversary of black studies at Wesleyan, I am confident that I don’t need to provide you with an abbreviated history of slavery and settler colonialism, of racial capitalism, white supremacy, fascism, and the long history of dispossession. I don’t need to recount the narrative of the republic and point out the obvious, the exclusions constitutive of citizenship, the liberty and equality erected on the foundation of stolen life and stolen land and the condition of rightlessness for all those not encompassed within the language of man and his inviolable entitlements and privilege.

I won’t belabor such points because I am speaking to a graduating class that has spent the last four years thinking about such issues and the historical and social forces that have made and shaped the world. A class cognizant of the intimacy of civilization and barbarism, value and predation, property and dispossession. The entanglement of the good life and the disposable one. You have been fortunate. You have enjoyed the luxury of devoting yourself to study and to the life of the mind. All that has been required of you is to write and think with impassioned teachers and committed classmates.

Now is the moment when you enter the world, and with this knowledge make a place with others. At the moment you arrive at what you wanted to be: a graduate, an educated person, a diploma-bearing debtor. You lose yourself, shift from one phase of becoming to another. Because every achievement is a culmination and a beginning. Every accomplishment points toward what has yet to be done; having arrived at the goal, you are lost again, needing to find your way to the next stage of things, forced to leave this self, this incarnation of you to enter anew.

The essence of who one is, as Hannah Arendt notes, comes into being only when life departs, leaving nothing behind but a story. Until then, this process of accumulating meaning and experience, love and loss, accomplishments and failures, victories and defeats, constitutes life. The beauty and constancy of this undoing and remaking of the self over and over again.

Today marks an auspicious culmination. I suspect many of you are preoccupied, if not anxious, about what is next, what comes after this. The gift of bare uncertainty that hurls you into adulthood. Part of me is on the lawn with you, still that young woman sitting with her class, lost in thoughts about what the future might bring, unsure, expectant, anticipating another world yet absolutely unknowing what its course or where things will turn. This is not to say that I am young. Quite the opposite. Only to underscore that I, too, am open and uncertain and not unhopeful regarding what the future might bring. It is to acknowledge that more time is behind me than ahead of me and that the opposite is true for you. We are here today to celebrate the opportunity and possibility that resides in that simple fact as much as to celebrate any degree in your hands.

So, I guess these remarks are really an elaborate ask masked as a set of reflections, as way of making a claim on you, imploring you to speculate about how the world might be otherwise. To make good the promise of another set of human arrangements no longer characterized by the brutal distribution of death and precarity, by racism, hatred, and cultivated indifference, by violence abstracted by algorithm and derivative, or embodied visceral and immediate by the extraction and monopoly of the planet’s resources, by gender and sexual violence.

I ask you this: What the world might be or how we might live in the fierce urgency of our now despite my attempts to refuse the conventions of the genre and as if being acted upon by some seemingly eternal repetition, compulsion, being directed by the collective yearning for a world better than this one, yielding to a desire . . . no, an imposition that I cannot dislodge or refuse.

So, I am asking you in anticipation of achievement and disappointment and accomplishment and failure to make another way, to trace a different path to another set of social arrangements so that we might all live.

Today, we honor you because of what you have achieved and where you have arrived, and we rejoice at the promise signaled by this graduation, which is a step in a process, a transformation, a condition, a change from one state to another, a turn in the road, a pause or rest in the process of becoming. We rejoice today in anticipation of where you might be headed and the world you might remake.

It is custom to announce the significance of such arrivals and departure with rituals and ceremony. So, Class of 2019, we celebrate you.

 

Senior Voices: Tostado, Young, Erodici Reflect on Their Years at Wes

Vanessa Tostado Senior Voices

“Senior Voices” was held at Memorial Chapel on May 25.

As part of the 2019 Commencement weekend festivities, graduating seniors reflected on their unique and transformative Wesleyan experiences during the “Senior Voices” event held May 25 in Memorial Chapel. In addition to the speeches, this year’s event also included a farewell song, “Irish Friendship Wish,” performed by Maria Rodriguez-Castro ’19, Joy Adedokun ’19, and Olivia Backal-Balik ’20.

Seniors Vanessa Tostado, Kati Young, and Matthew Erodici spoke of the changes they had undergone during their years at Wesleyan and the community and support that they found while here. Associate Professor of American Studies and Anthropology Margot Weiss provided the faculty address, encouraging students to embrace “growth that takes unexpected and novel forms, that moves and spreads . . . unpredictable, unruly, creative.”

President Roth Makes Remarks at 2019 Commencement

President's Remarks

President Michael Roth ’78 delivered remarks during Wesleyan’s 187th Commencement ceremony on May 26.

Wesleyan President Michael Roth ’78 made the following remarks (as prepared) during the 187th Commencement ceremony on Sunday, May 26:

Members of the Board of Trustees, members of the faculty and staff, distinguished guests, new recipients of graduate degrees and the mighty Class of 2019, I am honored to present some brief remarks on the occasion of this Commencement.

I’d like to ask those graduating today to remember the months before you left for college. Do you recall the excitement, nervousness, and anticipation you felt when you first arrived on campus? Meeting your roommates for the first time, getting your first pail from WesWings, discovering that watching volleyball can be terrifically exciting? As your Wesleyan adventure was beginning and your life was changing, the political life of this nation was also changing, though not for the better. Would-be leaders were abandoning the debate of issues in favor of nastiness and name calling, as they tried to figure out how to energize the base of their respective constituencies. The search for coherent policies, for value-driven strategies, or for pragmatic solutions took a back seat to intemperate appeals to racism, class resentment, divisiveness, and greed. Now, in 2019, the goal of mobilizing supporters with rage has been cemented into our national political culture. That’s the culture you now graduate into; that’s the culture we need your help fixing. The post-fascists tell us inquiry and persuasion no longer matter; we need your help in proving them wrong; we need your help in overcoming their corrosive, corrupt, and cynical point of view.

And with what you have learned here and skills you have gained, you CAN help. Some of you have studied government, others economics, while still others have taken a humanistic approach to comprehending how power, justice, and opportunity might be distributed more fairly, even more compassionately. Data analysts, like those who have worked with the Wesleyan Media Project, have illuminated the ways political communication is influenced by funding and by diverse technological platforms. Ethnographers, like those who have worked with our activist Anthropology faculty, have learned how to listen to and tell the stories of those most affected by policies otherwise made without their input. There is also a more general frame of mind cultivated at Wesleyan that is crucial to political life: and that is the openness to being persuaded to change one’s mind—to seek out those from whom you can gain new perspectives and ideas precisely because they don’t share your point of view. A campus is the place to have one’s ways of thinking tested—not just protected. If we are to repair our public life, we must develop habits of mind and spirit that allow us not just to celebrate diversity, but to learn from difference.

One of the reasons I love being president of our school is that I learn so much from the enthusiasms, the convictions, and the reasoned arguments of our students. Over the last four years, I have been energized by the hard work of activists aiming to eradicate the persistent poison of sexual violence, and I have been schooled by students who have faced up to the immense challenges of combating climate change, or who struggle against economic inequality. Students of faith have shown me how religious practice and rigorous inquiry can be combined, and conservative students have taught me to be mindful that even well-intentioned policies can undermine our freedoms. There have been many times when our campus community seems to come together in recognition of unjust situations that need fixing, but it has also been clear that there can be plenty of disagreement about what would constitute effective solutions that don’t themselves create even graver injustices. On our best days, we are able to explore our differences without fear; on our best days, we are able to work toward positive change with courage.

Now, as you take on new challenges beyond the University, we are counting on you. We are counting on you to reject the dismissal of norms for telling the truth and the labeling of anything one doesn’t like as “Fake” or as “Inappropriate.” We are counting on you to protect the freedom to think for oneself and to speak one’s mind, especially in situations where people disagree. We are counting on you to show others the power of listening to those with whom you have conflicts. We are counting on you to move beyond accumulating online followers to earning the respect of strangers—turning them into neighbors, teammates, friends who can work together.

Over these four years, I have gotten to know many of you in my classes, in student government, and even in demonstrations. In your courageous company I feel we may well be able to reject the cynical status quo that mobilizes rage, that we may be able to build a politics and a culture of compassionate solidarity rather than of fear and divisiveness.

Generations of Wesleyan alumni have benefited from this campus culture characterized by brave, practical idealism. As I say each year, we Wesleyans have used our education for the ‘good of the world,’ lest the future be shaped by those for whom justice and change, generosity and equality, diversity and tolerance, are much too threatening. Now we alumni are counting on you, Class of 2019, to join us in helping to shape our culture, so that it will not be shaped by the forces of violence, conformity, and elitism.

We are counting on you because we have already seen what you are capable of when you have the freedom and the tools, the mentors and the friendships, the insight and the affection to go beyond what others have defined as your limits. We know that in the years ahead you will explore unfamiliar realms and see possibilities that others might not. We know that you will find new ways to make connections across cultural borders—new ways to build community. When this happens, you will feel the power and promise of your education. And we, your Wesleyan family, we will be proud of how you keep your education alive by making it effective in the world.

It’s been nearly four years since we unloaded cars together at the base of Foss Hill, four years since parents shed (or maybe hid) a tear as they left you here “on your own.” It seems like such a short time ago. Now it’s you who are leaving us, but do remember that no matter how “on your own” you feel yourselves to be “out there,” you will always be members of the Wesleyan family. Wherever your exciting pursuits take you, please come home to alma mater often to share your news, your memories, and your dreams. Thank you and good luck!

Hazel Carby Provides Remarks at 2019 Commencement

Hazel Carby

Hazel Carby received an honorary doctorate from Wesleyan during the 187th Commencement ceremony May 26.

Hazel Carby and Michael Roth

Hazel Carby and President Michael Roth

Hazel V. Carby, who taught English at Wesleyan from 1982 to 1989, was named an Honorary Doctor of Letters during Wesleyan’s 187th Commencement Ceremony on May 26. The Charles C. and Dorothea S. Dilley Professor of African American Studies and director of the Initiative on Race, Gender and Globalization at Yale University, Carby was lauded for her decades of insightful scholarship, her activism, and her commitment to advancing African American Studies.

Carby’s remarks as prepared are below:

As a member of the faculty during the 1980s I found students at Wesleyan to be exceptionally creative, imaginative, and talented and deeply committed to movements for social justice. I was an ardent supporter of anti-apartheid protests during that decade and was inspired by the integrity and ethical stance of students who demanded that the University fully divest the $10.6 million in stocks it held with U.S. companies doing business in South Africa. I admired their spirit and determination as they marched and occupied buildings, singing and chanting as they were arrested and dragged onto buses by the Middletown police. While I am happy to celebrate with you the achievements of the past 50 years and the long continuing anti-racist struggle embodied in the field of African American and black diaspora studies, I want to temper celebration with a sober reminder that it is our actions not in the next 50 years but in the next 12 years that will determine the quality of life on earth.

The forces of white supremacy and racial capitalism have been reinvigorated and granted legitimacy by the executive, political, and legal branches of this carceral state. At the same time what we face in the future is being simultaneously denied or silenced: imminent climate catastrophe; soil poisoned with toxic herbicides and pesticides; the acidification and pollution of our oceans; the mass extinction of species and collapse of biodiversity; and billions of people dispossessed from their land by floods, droughts, fires, and crop failure. “The health of ecosystems on which we and all other species depend is deteriorating more rapidly than ever. We are eroding the very foundations of our economies, livelihoods, food security, health, and quality of life worldwide.”

From the Amazon to the Arctic, indigenous peoples are vigorously opposing the extraction and transportation of fossil fuels, they are fighting to preserve tropical and boreal forests from destruction by rapacious oil and mining corporations. Indigenous rangers continually clear tons of plastic waste from the remotest beaches in Northern Australia, plastic has even reached the bottom of the deepest trench in the Pacific Ocean. The Lummi Nation is feeding live salmon to starving Orca pods off San Juan Island in Washington.

Will we commit to join this struggle and instigate perhaps the largest social movement in history: a movement in solidarity to emancipate ourselves from fossil fuels, from our dependence on toxic chemicals, from the unfettered consumption of the natural resources of the earth and the voracious appetite for the profits that accrue from investments in extractive industries? Instead of being content to be passive subjects reduced to being a mere source of data for social media can we, must we, resurrect and reclaim an activist political citizenship which raises a collective voice, marches, protests, and rebels against extinction?

Rev. Edwin Sanders ’69 Makes Remarks at 2019 Commencement

Sanders speaking

Rev. Edwin Sanders II ’69 received an honorary degree naming him an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters during Commencement, May 26.

Reverend Edwin C. Sanders II ’69 and Wesleyan President Michael Roth

Reverend Edwin C. Sanders II ’69 and Wesleyan President Michael Roth

The Reverend Edwin C. Sanders II ’69 is the senior servant and founder of Metropolitan Interdenominational Church (established 1981) in Nashville, Tennessee. An anthropology major while at Wesleyan, Rev. Sanders began his career as co-director of Wesleyan’s African American Institute, later serving on Wesleyan’s Board of Trustees and receiving the University’s Distinguished Alumnus Award in 2014. He pursued graduate studies at Yale’s and Vanderbilt’s divinity schools, has been a member of advisory committees and councils for the Clinton, Bush, and Obama administrations, and has spoken at numerous international AIDS conferences. Rev. Sanders is the founding chair and current ambassador of the HIV Vaccine Trails Network Legacy Project Advisory Group designed to increase the participation of African Americans, Latinos, and Asian Pacific Islanders in HIV vaccine studies; and he serves on the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Scientific Advisory Board and the Boards of National Minority AIDS Council (NMAC), the Drug Policy Alliance, and the Black AIDS Institute.

Sanders’s speech is below:

When I think about the Class of 1969, of which I was a part, I realize that perhaps we have come a long way and there are some majors ways in which the experience here at Wesleyan helped to shape the responses we have been able to bring forth in many arenas. I won’t even begin to try to enumerate the many arenas in which we have come to play roles in professional life, as well as community life, and that allow us to be true citizens of the world. But I would say this to you: what we discovered in the relationship to developing our consciousness would allow us to be the ones who would promote and advance social justice for all people–that is something that we did a job of trying to develop in the mid-60s. Today, the 21st century realities that we face probably demand a kind of appreciation or a social justice consciousness that is equally great to that which we had 50 years ago.

When I think about celebrating the fact that we now have a department of African American studies [applause] that has been initiated on this campus, I’m excited, I’m thrilled, but I want you to know that I also have to realize that it is the demand that we made 50 years ago. And I pray that it will not be your 50th reunion before you see many of the other things that you know are a part of what will make this place that we have come to refer to very often as “Diversity University” the place that really represents the level of inclusiveness and welcome that takes us to new levels. And our years at Wesleyan are of major significance, especially as relates to developing the social justice consciousness that is necessary to address our 21st century realities.

Four hundred years ago, the horror of slavery became a defining moment in the history of this country. In 1831, this institution was established, and even though from the beginning there have been some gestures to correct the social sickness of racism, it was not until 1965 that the bold step of inclusion, which allows me to be able to stand here today, was taken. There are many such steps that still have to be taken.

I am honored to represent this era and I pray that this day will represent a day of rededication, a day of reconsecration, a day of new awareness, appreciation, and understanding of the power each and every one of us can bring to bear in the arenas of life that will be before us. And I pray that the academic environment at Wesleyan University will promote and encourage agents of truth and change, and that that is something that will never be dissipated. I can never begin to call all the names of all of those who have been a part of my life as a result of classroom experiences and relationships I have had here. But one thing I do know is that as we go forward, the experiences that you’ve had, those who have encouraged you, those who allowed you to become aware of the things that too often get swept under the rug and not dealt with forthrightly in institutions of higher learning, are things that you will carry with you.

I’m going to leave one thing that I would have you carry with you. I must admit I picked up the Wesleyan songbook the other day and I found myself realizing that I really don’t know any of those songs [laughter]. But there were songs that we sang and one of those songs I want to sing with you right now. I want to encourage you to sing it, and if there are those that are bold enough and believe enough in it, I’m sure you will sing it with me. A few years ago, an honorary degree was conferred upon Bernice Reagon, who most of you all know for her work with Sweet Honey and the Rock. So, if you will and if you feel it’s part of something you can embrace, sing with me and if you want to be bold enough, you can stand while you sing the simple words I pray you’ll carry with you (even if you never learned any of the songs in the Wesleyan songbook). The song simply says:

[singing] “We who believe in freedom cannot rest until it comes.”

Morreale ’19 Delivers Senior Class Welcome

Senior Address 2019

Sam Morreale ’19 delivered the Senior Class Welcome during Commencement, May 26.

Samuel Morreale ’19, a Science in Society and theater double major, delivered the Senior Class Welcome during Wesleyan’s 187th Commencement ceremony on May 26. The text of his remarks as prepared are below:

For me, and many others, Wesleyan has been a space of refuge and respite; it has been a place of escape. My experience here has allowed movement from a place of confinement to a place of “freedom.” I’m not naive; I know I am not truly free and probably won’t ever be. Truth is that I escaped one type of confinement only to enter another. But the space afforded me by this institution offers its own type of liberation. I am a poor, queer, black/brown, first-generation student who is the son of recent immigrants. In many ways, I was not meant to end up here, nor am I welcome. My displacement at Wesleyan is and has been felt every day. Yet the opportunity Wesleyan has offered is clear. Because of this space I now have the power to name—a power that is as liberating as it is controlling. My Wesleyan education has given me the opportunity to take a critical view of myself, the labels I am given, the narratives I am ‘meant’ to live, the narratives you are ‘meant’ to live, and have the power (or at least the illusion of power) to refuse or accept any of it. Thinking with Saidiya Hartman, Wesleyan has given me the space to imagine my own realities—my own histories—by recognizing the histories before me as presented to control where my own history can go. Before Wesleyan, the course of my life was linear, unquestioning, and controlled by a greater social system I was not privy to understand. After Wesleyan, these things may all still be true! BUT now I am filled with defined questions, anger, passion, ambition, and ability to recognize where this social system mediates my life. I have a determination to use this newfound power graced by Wesleyan to make more space for myself and for others, and I hope that the Class of 2019 will offer the same space to the education we have been afforded.

As much as it might try, Wesleyan is not a bubble. Our experiences here were defined by those that came before. Those experiences gathered here, danced with one another, and then transformed into what they are now. Just as when we began, these experiences will now carry us into our future moments. My question then is how to do justice to the future we are being propelled toward? How do we do justice to the immense privilege of this education? My offering to the class of 2019 and all who have touched it—Take a moment to alienate yourself. Recognize your body as it is placed in a collective of others. Recognize the stories that have been afforded space. Then move with purpose. Hold on to the many definitions of activism that we have been taught here, and mobilize them wherever you go, remembering that activism is a daily practice in the most mundane sense. We have all been given a space on this campus that many aren’t even offered the opportunity to fathom. Let the pressure of that fact and its reality weigh on you. What I am asking for is a conscious presence in interaction and interrelation that might minimize the violence which we all perpetuate in this system. In this pursuit, I see joy and I feel placed.

 

Alumni Honored for Distinguished Achievements, Outstanding Service at Annual Assembly, Meeting

The award winners stand on stage in two rows.

President Roth, far left, and members of the Alumni Association Executive Committee joined the alumni receiving awards on the stage of Crowell Concert Hall before the Annual Meeting of the Alumni Association. Front row (l. to r.): Secretary of the Alumni Association Cecilia Pohorille McCall ’91; Distinguished Alumni Bozoma “Boz” Saint John ’99, Rob King ’84, and Jeffrey Deitch ’74; Outstanding Service Award recipient Daphne Kwok ’84; and Distinguished Alumnus Gordon Crawford ’69. Top row (l. to r.): Chair of the Alumni Association Muzzy Rosenblatt ’87, Distinguished Alumna Jenno Topping ’89; Outstanding Service Award recipients Bert Edwards ’59 and Edward Murphy ’59; James L. McConaughy Jr. Memorial Award recipient Alexander Chee ’89; Distinguished Alumnus Scott Gottlieb ’94; and Distinguished Alumnus Thomas Kail ’99, who spoke on how “Finding Your People Matters the Most.”  (Photo by Tom Dzimian)

At the Assembly and Annual Meeting of the Wesleyan Alumni Association on May 25, seven alumni received Distinguished Alumnus Awards. Three Outstanding Service Awards were presented, along with the James L. McConaughy Jr. Memorial Award, which is given to a member of the community whose writing conveys “unusual insights and understanding of current and past events.” Thomas Kail ’99, renowned and award-winning director and producer for theater, film, and television, delivered the keynote, “Finding Your People Matters the Most,” tracing the path that led him to his current position through a dedication to service and surrounding himself with others who shared his vision.

Muzzy Rosenblatt ’87, chair of the Alumni Association, delivered the citations honoring the alumni.

The award recipients are:

THOMAS MICHAEL KAIL ’99: Thomas Kail is a director and producer for theater, film, and television. The winner of two Emmys for producing and directing Grease: Live for Fox television, he won a Tony for directing Hamilton in 2016. His latest project is the limited series Fosse/Verdon, on which he served as executive producer for the series and as director of five episodes. He serves as honorary co-chair of the University’s Hamilton Prize Selection Committee.

GORDON CRAWFORD ’69: Gordy Crawford retired at the end of 2012 after a 41-year career with the Capital Group’s Capital Research and Management Company. He is the chairman of the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Foundation, as well as a lifetime active trustee and past chairman of the board of Southern California Public Radio.

JEFFREY W. DEITCH ’74: In the art world, Jeffrey Deitch has performed nearly every role: artist, art critic, curator, museum director, and art dealer. Now operating galleries in New York and Los Angeles, he is the author of a new book on figurative painting, Unrealism, which will be published by Rizzoli in the fall of 2019.

President Roth (left) and Distinguished Alumnus Rob King ’84 listen as Muzzy Rosenblatt ’87 cites King’s accomplishments at the ceremony.

ROBERT F. KING ’84: As senior vice president at ESPN, Rob King is an influential multimedia architect at the biggest brand in sports, directly overseeing ESPN’s entire portfolio of storytelling assets. A six-time Sports Emmy award-winner and a past Pulitzer judge, King is a member of the Associated Press board of directors, the Center for Investigative Reporting board, and the Poynter Institute’s board of trustees.

JENNO TOPPING ’89: As current president of Film and Television at Chernin Entertainment, Jenno Topping oversees all of the company’s development and production, including the Oscar-nominated Hidden Figures (2016). This past year, Ms. Topping spearheaded “Who’s in the Room,” Time’s Up Entertainment’s mentorship program designed to increase the presence of individuals from underrepresented groups in the producer and executive ranks.

SCOTT GOTTLIEB ’94: Scott Gottlieb is a physician and health policy expert who served as the 23rd commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration from May 2017 to April 2019, during which he focused on a wide variety of issues, including drug pricing, medical product innovation, and vaccination promotion. Currently, he has returned to his role as a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, a think tank in Washington, D.C.

Fowler, Northrop, Siry Receive Binswanger Prizes for Excellence in Teaching

2019 Binswanger winners

Wesleyan faculty (from left) Joseph Siry, Brian Northrop, and Erika Franklin Fowler join President Michael Roth before the 187th Commencement ceremony, May 26. During the ceremony, the three professors were honored with Binswanger Prizes for Excellence in Teaching. (Photo by Olivia Drake)

Every year at Commencement, Wesleyan recognizes three outstanding teachers with Binswanger Prizes for Excellence in Teaching. These prizes, made possible by gifts from the family of the late Frank G. Binswanger Sr., Hon. ’85, underscore Wesleyan’s commitment to its scholar-teachers, who are responsible for the University’s distinctive approach to liberal arts education.

Recommendations are solicited from alumni of the last 10 graduating classes, as well as current juniors, seniors, and graduate students. Recipients are chosen by a selection committee of faculty and members of the Alumni Association Executive Committee.

This year, during the 187th Commencement ceremony, Wesleyan honored the following faculty members for their excellence in teaching:

Erika Franklin Fowler
Erika Franklin Fowler, associate professor of government and director of the Wesleyan Media Project, has taught at Wesleyan since 2009. She has a BA in political science and mathematics from St. Olaf College, and an MA and PhD in political science from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. She served as a Robert Wood Johnson Scholar in Health Policy Research at the University of Michigan School of Public Health from 2007 to 2009.

Wilson Receives Baldwin Medal During 187th Commencement Ceremony

2019 Baldwin Award

President Michael Roth with Baldwin Medal recipient Barbara-Jan Wilson at Wesleyan’s 187th Commencement, May 26. (Photo by Olivia Drake)

At the University’s 187th Commencement on May 26, Wesleyan presented the Baldwin Medal, the highest award of the Alumni Association, to Barbara-Jan Wilson.

For over 36 years, Wilson has been a stalwart in the Wesleyan administration and a driving force behind the University’s fundraising efforts. Beginning at Wesleyan in 1982 as the director of Career Planning, she moved on to serve as dean of Admission and Financial Aid in 1990, and then as vice president of University Relations from 1999 to 2018. Throughout that time, Wilson has been one of the University’s biggest champions and cheerleaders, boldly and convincingly making the case for the value of a Wesleyan education and the importance of giving back to the institution.

“For so many of us, Barbara-Jan represents the heart and soul of Wesleyan,” said Donna Morea ’76, P’06, chair of Wesleyan’s Board of Trustees. “Her genuine love for the institution is infectious, but it is the way that she makes us feel that is her greatest gift. She cares about our success, our families, and our lives. Barbara-Jan has hundreds, maybe thousands, of people like me who genuinely believe we are one of her very best friends. And we all are.”