Tag Archive for shasha seminar

Shasha Seminar 2017 Convenes Experts on Gun Legislation Debate, Paths Forward, Oct. 27-28

Guns in American Society, this year’s Shasha Seminar for Human Concerns, will be held on campus on Friday and Saturday, Oct. 27-28. Made possible by a generous grant from the Shasha family, the 16th annual event will convene experts, including Wesleyan faculty and administrators, as well as alumni from across the country, to examine current debates about the role of guns in American society and discuss ways of reducing the national incidence of gun violence.

According to seminar organizer Jennifer Tucker, associate professor of history and science in society and researcher in the history of technology, law and culture, guns are a topic of concern not just for those advocating for gun control but also for gun rights advocates, who see the issue as a question of personal liberty. The debate, she notes, is now moving onto college campuses, with the recent passage of legislation allowing guns on campus in 10 states. Additionally, 16 more states are considering such legislation.

Shasha Seminar Sparks Dialogue on Universities’ Response to Mass Incarceration

Michael Romano ’94 delivered the keynote address at the Shasha Seminar Oct. 14 in Memorial Chapel.

Michael Romano ’94 delivered the keynote address at the Shasha Seminar Oct. 14 in Memorial Chapel.

The 13th Annual Shasha Seminar for Human Concerns, held Oct. 14-15, offered panels and discussions on “The Role of the University in the Era of Mass Incarceration.” Experts and activists from across the country, as well as members of the Wesleyan community, considered practical and philosophical responses to the current situation, placing it in a historical perspective that began with slavery. Additionally, Wesleyan’s Center for Prison Education (CPE) program alumni gave individual testimony to the imperative they placed on access to learning within the penal system.

Keynote speaker Michael Romano ’94, who teaches at Stanford Law School, is the co-founder and director of the Stanford Justice Advocacy Project. He also co-authored Proposition 36,  which overturned key sections of California’s “Three Strikes” law that had been enacted in 1994, causing the state’s prison population to balloon with many inmates sentenced to life terms for nonviolent crimes.

“The Role of the University in the Era of Mass Incarceration” Topic of 15th Annual Shasha Seminar Oct. 14-15

During the 2016 Shasha Seminar, participants will focus on mass incarceration and the university’s role in this seemingly intractable problem. The annual seminar is an educational forum for Wesleyan alumni, parents, and friends that provides an opportunity to explore issues of global concern in a small environment.

During the 2016 Shasha Seminar, participants will focus on mass incarceration and the university’s role in this seemingly intractable problem. The annual seminar is an educational forum for Wesleyan alumni, parents, and friends that provides an opportunity to explore issues of global concern in a small environment.

With 2.25 million citizens behind bars, America incarcerates more people than any other country.

The Wesleyan Center for Prison Education is proud to present the 15th Annual Shasha Seminar for Human Concerns: The Role of the University in the Era of Mass Incarceration. Join students, alumni, faculty, and leading experts from across the country on Oct. 14-15 to discuss this pressing issue and examine the university’s role in addressing it.

Registration is open now.

Speakers will lead panels on the following topics: Mass Incarceration and the University Curriculum, The Role of University-Produced Scholarship in Public Policy, College-in-Prison’s Effect on Incarcerated Students: A Discussion with Center for Prison Education Alumni, How College-in-Prison Makes for Better Universities and Better Communities and The Role of Public and Private Partnerships in Addressing Mass Incarceration. View the entire schedule online.

Michael Romano

Michael Romano

Michael Romano ‘94 will deliver the keynote address at 4:30 p.m. Oct. 14 in Memorial Chapel. Romano, who teaches at Stanford Law School and is the co-founder and director of the Stanford Justice Advocacy Project, will speak about the scope and severity of the country’s mass incarceration crisis and what the university’s roles and identities might be with regard to the carceral state.

Romano’s current work involves assisting the White House with President Obama’s initiative to grant clemency to nonviolent drug offenders and with law enforcement officials in California on police shootings. He also co-authored Proposition 36 which overturned key sections of California’s “Three Strikes” law. In addition to authoring scholarly and popular articles, Romano has been profiled in The New York Times Magazine, Rolling Stone, The Economist and others. Most recently he was a subject of the PBS documentary The Return. Romano’s talk is open to the public.

Other Shasha Seminar speakers include:
Ellen Lagemann, distinguished fellow at the Bard Prison Initiative and former Dean of Harvard’s Graduate School of Education;
Jody Lewen ‘86, director of the Prison University Project;
Rebecca Ginsburg, associate professor of education policy, University of Illinois and director of the Education Justice Project;
Vivian Nixon, executive director of the College and Community Fellowship;
Craig Steven Wilder, MIT history professor and fellow at the Bard Prison Initiative;
Lori Gruen, the William Griffin Professor of Philosophy at Wesleyan;
Chyrell Bellamy, assistant professor of psychiatry at Yale University;
Scott Semple, Commissioner of Connecticut Department of Corrections;
Doug Wood, program officer for Youth Opportunity and Learning, Ford Foundation;
Mike Lawlor, Connecticut State Under Secretary for Criminal Justice Policy and Planning;
Greg Berman ’89, co-founder and director of the Center for Court Innovation;
Sylvia Ryerson ’10, producer of Restorative Radio;
Sarah Russell, professor of law at Quinnipiac University;
and Bashaun Brown ’18, CEO of T.R.A.P. House. Read more about the speakers online.

Reginald Betts

Reginald Betts

The final speaker of the seminar will be noted poet, memoirist and author Reginald Dwayne Betts. Betts is the author of A Question of Freedom: A Memoir of Learning, Survival, and Coming of Age in Prison, Shahid Reads His Own Palm and Bastards of the Reagan Era. Incarcerated at age 16, Betts spent eight years behind bars where he completed high school and began writing. Upon release he completed his BA and MFA degrees and was recently awarded his JD from Yale Law School.

The Shasha Seminar for Human Concerns, endowed by James J. Shasha ’50, P’82 supports lifelong learning and encourages participants to expand their knowledge and perspectives on significant issues. The event is organized by the Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship, the Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life and University Relations.

Changemakers Convene at Wesleyan Social Impact Summit

Wesleyan students, staff, faculty, alumni and guests participated in several workshops during the Social Impact Summit Nov. 13-14 on campus.

Wesleyan students, staff, faculty, alumni and guests participated in several workshops during the Social Impact Summit Nov. 13-14 on campus.

More than 100 alumni and other members of the Wesleyan community attended the Social Impact Summit, Nov. 13-14, on campus. The summit was sponsored by the Shasha Seminar for Human Concerns. Endowed by James Shasha ’50, P’82, the seminar supports lifelong learning and encourages participants to expand their knowledge and perspectives on significant issues. The event included keynote speakers with TED-style talks on the theme “The Change I Want to See,” panel discussions, and workshops, as well as networking opportunities.

“Social impact and entrepreneurship are deeply embedded in Wesleyan culture, and our students and alumni are known for creating significant change in the world,” said Makaela Kingsley ’98, director of the Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship. Rob Rosenthal, director of the Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life; and Cathy Lechowicz, director of the Center for Community Partnerships also provided welcoming remarks.

​Kirk Adams '73 P'13, International Executive Vice President of Service Employees International Union, talked about the transition to online voting as the change he wants to see because our society is evolving into an increasingly technological one, and doing so would be a surefire way to include the youth in the vote.

​Kirk Adams ’73 P’13, International Executive Vice President of Service Employees International Union, talked about the transition to online voting as the change he wants to see because our society is evolving into an increasingly technological one, and doing so would be a surefire way to include the youth in the vote.

Keynote speakers offering TED-style remarks in Memorial Chapel, which were open to the public. They included Kirk Adams ’73 P’13, international executive vice president of the Service Employees International Union, who leads the work of SEIU Healthcare; Irma Gonzalez, the principal of Zoen, specializing in change and transition management in support of social justice advocacy; Jessica Posner Odede ’09 chief operating officer and co-founder of Shining Hope for Communities; and Kennedy Odede ’12, the CEO and co-founder of Shining Hope for Communities (SHOFCO).

In their talks, Adams spoke on making voting “accessible, universal, and familiar,” calling for the effort to “push this country to be what it should be.” Gonzalez highlighted the qualities of an equitable society—one where our success would not be predetermined by birth and skin color. “How do we harness technology in the service of social justice?” she asked.

“The Novel” Topic of 2014 Shasha Seminar, April 5-6

More than a dozen authors will speak on "The Novel" during the 2014 Shasha Seminar for Human Concerns.

More than a dozen authors will speak on “The Novel” during the 2014 Shasha Seminar for Human Concerns.

During the 13th annual Shasha Seminar for Human Concerns, Wesleyan faculty, staff, alumni, parents and friends have the opportunity to explore issues of global concern in a small seminar environment. This year’s topic is “The Novel.”

The Shasha Seminar will take place April 5-6 on Wesleyan’s campus. Fourteen speakers, including several award-winning novelists and authors, will offer readings from their own work and lead forums on “My First Novel,” “Beyond Genre,” “The Small Press,” “Crime Novels,” “The State of Publishing,” “Great New Writers” and more. View the full program online here.

“This conference on ‘The Novel’ — in all of the novel’s prize-winning glory, and its glorious failures, the tragic and the comic, and all permutations, from graphic to Twitter-written to the genre-bending— is our gift to all the writers and reader in the Wesleyan community,” said Shasha Seminar coordinator Amy Bloom, the Kim-Frank Family University Writer-in-Residence. “If you care about books and want to meet some of America’s greatest writers, April in Middletown turns out to be the place to be.”

Guest speakers include radio host Faith Middleton; novelists/authors Richard McCann, Michael Cunningham, Kelly Link, Bob Bledsoe, Victor LaValle, Chip Delaney, Scott O’Connor, Scott Hutchins, Salvatore Scibona, Chip Delaney, Roxanne Coady; Kit Reed, Wesleyan Writer-in-Residence; and Amy Bloom.

Endowed by James Shasha ’50, P’82, the Shasha Seminar for Human Concerns supports lifelong learning and encourages participants to expand their knoweldge and perspectives on significant issues.

The seminar’s cost is $175 a person. To sign up, click on the REGISTRATION button on the Shasha Seminar website.

Shasha Seminar Participants Celebrate Music and Public Life

The 11th Annual Shasha Seminar for Human Concerns was held on Nov. 8-9. Endowed by James J. Shasha ’50 P’82, the seminar is an educational forum for Wesleyan alumni, students, faculty and friends that provides an opportunity to explore issues of global concern in a small seminar environment.

The 11th Annual Shasha Seminar for Human Concerns was held on Nov. 8-9. The focus of this year’s seminar was Music and Public Life. In addition to lectures, seminar participants were treated to concerts and participated in musical performances.

Endowed by James J. Shasha ’50 P’82, the seminar is an educational forum for Wesleyan alumni, students, faculty and friends that provides an opportunity to explore issues of global concern in a small seminar environment.

Endowed by James J. Shasha ’50 P’82, the seminar is an educational forum for Wesleyan alumni, students, faculty and friends that provides an opportunity to explore issues of global concern in a small seminar environment.

Ethnomusicologist Anthony Seeger delivered the keynote address Nov. 8 titled, "Can We Safeguard Disappearing Musical Traditions? And If We Can, Should We?” Seeger is distinguished professor of ethnomusicology, emeritus, at the UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music and director emeritus of Smithsonian Folkways Recordings at the Smithsonian Institution.

Ethnomusicologist Anthony Seeger delivered the keynote address Nov. 8 titled, “Can We Safeguard Disappearing Musical Traditions? And If We Can, Should We?” Seeger is distinguished professor of ethnomusicology, emeritus, at the UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music and director emeritus of Smithsonian Folkways Recordings at the Smithsonian Institution.

More information on the 11th Annual Shasha Seminar is online here. (Photos by Dat Vu ’15)

Shasha Seminar to Focus on Music and Public Life Theme Nov. 8-9

The Shasha Seminar will offer expert articulation of the issues, from Wesleyan and Middletown to the broader arenas of American and global music today, as well as hands-on engagement with a number of world music traditions.

The Shasha Seminar will offer expert articulation of the issues, from Wesleyan and Middletown to the broader arenas of American and global music today, as well as hands-on engagement with a number of world music traditions.

The 11th Annual Shasha Seminar for Human Concerns, featuring keynote speaker, ethnomusicologist Anthony Seeger, will be held on Nov. 8-9. Endowed by James J. Shasha ’50 P’82, the seminar is an educational forum for Wesleyan alumni, students, faculty and friends that provides an opportunity to explore issues of global concern in a small seminar environment.

The focus of this year’s seminar is Music and Public Life. It is part of a year-long celebration of Music and Public Life taking place at Wesleyan over the 2012-13 academic year. The full schedule is online here.

Seeger’s keynote address, to be delivered at 8 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 8, is called, “Can We Safeguard Disappearing Musical Traditions? And If We Can, Should We?” Seeger is distinguished professor of ethnomusicology, emeritus, at the UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music and director emeritus of Smithsonian Folkways Recordings at the Smithsonian Institution. His books and published articles have focused on issues of land use and human rights for Brazilian Indians, issues of archiving and intellectual property, and ethnomusicology theory and method. He was executive producer of all recordings issued on the Smithsonian Folkways label between 1988 and 2000, a total of about 250 audio and video recordings.

Seminar participants also will be treated to concerts and will participate in musical workshops. On Nov. 9, two discussion sessions will be held on local music and national/transnational music.

Wesleyan’s Winslow-Kaplan Professor of Music Mark Slobin will facilitate the seminar. He is author and editor of many books on Afghanistan and Central Asia, eastern European Jewish music, and ethnomusicology theory.

The registration fee is $100 per person, and includes all sessions, receptions, meals and conference materials. Seating is limited; register online here. Contact Kathy Macko at kmacko@wesleyan.edu or 860-685-2737 for information on scholarship assistance.

Energy Experts Discuss Economy of Oil at Shasha Seminar

Wesleyan hosted the 10th Annual Shasha Seminar for Human Concerns on April 19-20. The Shasha Seminar is an educational forum for Wesleyan alumni, parents, faculty and friends that provides an opportunity to explore issues of global concern in a small seminar environment.

Endowed by James J. Shasha ’50 P’82, the seminar supports lifelong learning and encourages participants to expand their knowledge and perspectives on significant issues. The 2012 theme was The Political Economy of Oil. Photos of the two-day event are below: (Photos by Olivia Drake and Bill Tyner ’13)

Daniel Esty, commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, delivered the keynote address titled, "Protecting Our Environment in Turbulent Times" April 19 in Memorial Chapel. Commissioner Esty spoke about the need to continue moving forward with an energy and environmental agenda for the 21st century, despite a backlash that has developed on these issues.

Dean Malouta P’12, retired geologist with Shell Oil Company, and David Work ’68, P’93, retired regional president of BP Amoco Corporation spoke on "Peak Oil and Beyond" during the Shasha Seminar. Phillip Resor, assistant professor of earth and environmental sciences, moderated the talk. The panelists explored geology and extraction techniques and questioned, "Are we on the verge of transition to a post-oil world?"

“Political Economy of Oil” Topic of Shasha Seminar

The Shasha Seminar includes sessions on Peak Oil and Beyond, the Oil Business: Profit and Social Responsibility; Oil and the Glory; War, Instability and the Search for Energy Security; and Environmental Sustainability and the Future of Petrocarbons.

The Wesleyan community is invited to the 10th annual Shasha Seminar for Human Concerns on April 19-20. This year, experts will explore the topic, “The Political Economy of Oil.”

“Energy policy is always in the news. But with gas prices above $4 a gallon, shale gas revolutionizing the gas industry, and intense debates over the construction of the Keystone pipeline, it has never been more topical,” says Peter Rutland, Colin and Nancy Campbell Professor in Global Issues and Democratic Thought, Professor of Government, Professor of Russian and Eastern European Studies

Daniel Esty, commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection will lead the keynote address on "Protecting Our Environment in Turbulent Times" at the Shasha Seminar for Human Concerns on April 19.

At 8 p.m. April 19, Daniel Esty, commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, will lead the keynote address on “Protecting Our Environment in Turbulent Times.” The event takes place in Memorial Chapel and is free of charge.

Commissioner Esty will talk about the need to continue moving forward with an energy and environmental agenda for the 21st century, despite a backlash that has developed on these issues.

While some question the need to move toward a cleaner and cheaper energy future and the value of environmental regulation, Connecticut is determined to serve as a national model on how an integrated approach to energy and the environment can best protect the public health and our natural resources—and also contribute to economic growth and job creation.

At 9 a.m. on April 20, Shasha Seminar panels will begin; topics include: “Peak Oil and Beyond, the Oil Business: Profit and Social Responsibility;” “War, Instability and the Search for Energy Security;” and “Environmental Sustainability and the Future of Petrocarbons.”

At 1 p.m. on April 20, Steve LeVine, author of The Oil and The Glory, will give the Shasha Luncheon Lecture at Beckham Hall. The event is free and open to the public.

This year’s Shasha seminar will include participation by Wesleyan faculty Mary Alice Haddad, associate professor of government, associate professor of environmental studies, associate professor of East Asian Studies; Chris Hogendorn, associate professor of economics; Anne Peters, assistant professor of government; and Phil Resor, assistant professor of earth and environmental sciences. Matthew Roe ’05; David Work ’68, P’93; Paul McDermott ’76, P’12, Ladeene Freimuth ’89 and Dean Malouta P’12 are among the panelists. Professor Rutland is the event’s facilitator.

Register online here. View the full program here.

The Shasha Seminar, endowed by James J. Shasha ’50, P’82 is an educational forum for the Wesleyan community and friends that provides an opportunity to explore issues of global concern in a small seminar environment.

Shasha Keynote: “What the History of White People Can Tell Us about Race”

Nell Irvin Painter will deliver the 9th Annual Shasha Seminar for Human Concerns Keynote Address April 9.

Nell Irvin Painter will deliver the 9th Annual Shasha Seminar for Human Concerns Keynote Address titled, “What the History of White People Can Tell Us about Race in America.”

Nell Irvin Painter

“Americans are likely to think first and only of black people when the topic of race comes up,” she says. “But in the past Americans considered as white have also been raced and ranked as belonging to better or worse white races. In and of itself this history is fascinating, but beyond its intellectual interest, it can also offer some ideas about the functions of racial categorization in science and in everyday life.”

The event is open to the public and will be held at 8 p.m., April 9, in Memorial Chapel.

Nell Irvin Painter is the Edwards Professor of American History, emerita, at Princeton University. The former president of the Organization of American Historians and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, she is the author of seven books, including Standing at Armageddon (1987), Sojourner Truth (1996), and The History of White People (2010). In addition to her scholarly life, Painter currently is pursuing an M.F.A in painting at the Rhode Island School of Design.

“Histories of Race” is the topic of the 2011 Shasha Seminar. This year, for the first time, Wesleyan is offering a semester-long undergraduate course as a complement to the Shasha Seminar. Students from this class, “Histories of Race: Rethinking the Human in an Era of Enlightenment” taught by Professor Andrew Curran, will join seminar participants for discussion during the 3-day weekend, April 8 – 10.

Endowed by James Shasha ’50 P’82 GP ’14, the Shasha Seminars for Human Concerns provide a forum through which Wesleyan alumni, parents, students and friends come together with scholars and other experts to expand their knowledge and perspectives on issues of global significance. Visit www.wesleyan.edu/alumni/shasha for additional information or to register for the weekend seminar.