Tag Archive for students

2016 Patricelli Center Seed Grant Winners Announced

Members of team behind TRAP House, one of the three social ventures that won a seed grant, presented their pitch before a live audience of the Board of Trustees, Patricelli Center Advisory Board and others. Presenting (from left to right) are Irvine Peck's-Agaya '18, Gabe Weinreb '18, Bashaun Brown, and Sara Eismont '18.

Members of the team behind TRAP House, one of the three social ventures awarded a seed grant, presented their pitch before members of the Board of Trustees, Patricelli Center Advisory Board and others. Presenting (from left to right) are Irvine Peck’s-Agaya ’18, Gabe Weinreb ’18, Bashaun Brown and Sara Eismont ’18.

Three social ventures started by Wesleyan students were recently awarded $5,000 seed grants in the Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship’s annual Seed Grant Challenge. They are Kindergarten Kickstart, TRAP House and Walking Elephants Home.

The last weekend in February, all six finalists for the seed grants presented pitches for their ventures before the Board of Trustees, Patricelli Center Advisory Board and Seed Grant judges, as well as representatives of CT Innovations and the ‎State of Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development, fellow students, and others. The event was also livestreamed. One of the other finalists, <Zim/Code>, chose to withdraw from the Seed Grant competition before selections were made, after the project received $10,000 from another funder.

The remaining finalists, Give Education and Pertiwi Initiative, were awarded smaller runner-up grants funded by members of the Board of Trustees who attended the pitches and believed all six teams were worthy of validation.

“This was the third year that we awarded seed grants in a pitch competition format,” said Makaela Kingsley, director of the Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship. “I am always blown away by the finalists, and this year was no exception. From Becca Winkler’s thorough understanding of the environmental and cultural conditions in northern Thailand to Irvine Peck’s-Agaya’s deep personal commitment to her economic development work, every person who took that stage captured the audience’s attention and garnered their support. More than launching ventures, this process helps students develop creative competence and confidence that will make them effective changemakers and capable leaders. I believe it’s a critical piece of a Wesleyan education.”

New Student-Run Workshop Allows Any Student to Pursue Creative Projects

Students gather to celebrate the opening of the Workshop, a student-run art space on campus

Students gathered to celebrate the opening of the Workshop, a student-run art space on campus.

This month, the Workshop, a new student-run arts collective, opened in the basement of Hewitt 8. The collective was created to provide space, support and resources to any student wanting to pursue a creative project—from bookmaking and woodworking to photography and filmmaking to sewing and weaving.

The approximately 1,800-square-foot arts space had its grand opening on Feb. 13. In the weeks prior to the opening, there was a call for art in any stage of completion, which was shared in the gallery portion of the opening. There was a brief performance portion of the opening, with live-responsive drawing, poetry and songs. Students were encouraged to walk around the space, explore the different rooms, and engage with each other in creative capacities.

The idea for the Workshop was independently conceived by Isaac Schneider ’16 and Rachel Day ’16. As a university major, falling outside a traditional department, Schneider felt like he was lacking access to campus art facilities, and wanted to help others like him find resources to do creative work. Day had been running the DIY Collective for a few years, which provided funding for students to pursue creative projects outside the curriculum, but found that the group’s success was stunted by not having a physical space in which to work on projects and store materials. The two got to know each other while working on a senior film thesis, and began developing plans for the Workshop last spring.

Wesleyan Hosts Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics

More than 200 women undergraduates from the North East who are majoring in physics attended the American Physical Society Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics (CUWiP)

Attendees from the American Physical Society Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics gathered for a group photo. Wesleyan is the first liberal arts college to host a CUWiP.  Pictured in red at far left, assistant professor Chris Othon, and pictured at far right, assistant professor Meredith Hughes co-organized the conference at Wesleyan.

More than 200 women undergraduates from the Northeast attended the American Physical Society Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics (CUWiP) Jan. 15-17 at Wesleyan. Wesleyan was one of nine institutions from around the country to host a conference. (View an extensive recap of the conference starting on Page 8 of this APS newsletter.)

The APS CUWiP provides female physics majors with the opportunity to experience a professional conference, information about graduate school and professions in physics, and access to other women in physics with whom they can share experiences, advice and ideas.

The program included panel discussions about graduate school and careers in physics, presentations and discussions about women in physics, laboratory tours, student research talks, a student poster session, banquet and career fair.

Senior Thesis Writers Discuss Research with Wesleyan Community

On Nov. 6, four Wesleyan seniors spoke to members of the Wesleyan community about their thesis topics and research. The event, “Celebrating Seniors: Research Excellence at Wesleyan and Abroad” took place in Judd Hall, and was moderated by the Class of 2016 Dean David Phillips.

The student presenters were Tahreem Khalied ’16, Claire Wright ’16, Simon Chen ’16 and Kate Cullen ’16, and their projects varied widely. (Story by Margaret Curtis ’16, photos by Rebecca Goldfarb Terry ’19)

Tahreem Khalied, who moved to the United States from Pakistan four years ago, transferred to Wesleyan for her sophomore year and decided to declare the American studies major. Khalied initially thought that writing a thesis was not for her, but was encouraged by the freedom that the American Studies Department offered and soon changed her mind. She decided to write a novel based on her experience reconciling her identity as an immigrant and as an American, and including the background in critical social theory she acquired through the American studies major. The novel’s title is Just the Right Amount of American, and Khalied jokes that she is the protagonist.

Tahreem Khalied, who moved to the United States from Pakistan four years ago, transferred to Wesleyan for her sophomore year and decided to declare the American studies major. Khalied initially thought that writing a thesis was not for her, but was encouraged by the freedom that the American Studies Department offered and soon changed her mind. She decided to write a novel based on her experience reconciling her identity as an immigrant and as an American, and including the background in critical social theory she acquired through the American studies major. The novel’s title is Just the Right Amount of American, and Khalied jokes that she is the protagonist.

Claire Wright, a College of Letters, French and psychology tripled major, on the other hand, knew since her freshman year that she would write a thesis – she just did not know what it would be about. She found her topic when the MINDS Foundation, a foundation founded by recent Wesleyan graduates that brings mental health care to rural India, asked her to study the effect of using a Western diagnostic of PTSD to treat survivors of sexual violence in rural India. Wright, who had been working with MINDS since the summer after her sophomore year, thought this was a perfect idea for a senior thesis, and jokingly told the organization that she’d “get back to them in a year.” Since then she has been studying how PTSD manifests, how dynamic nominalism affects the way symptoms come about, and feminist and post-colonial perspectives of aid-work.

Claire Wright, a College of Letters, French and psychology triple major, on the other hand, knew since her freshman year that she would write a thesis – she just did not know what it would be about. She found her topic when the MINDS Foundation, a foundation founded by recent Wesleyan graduates that brings mental health care to rural India, asked her to study the effect of using a Western diagnostic of PTSD to treat survivors of sexual violence in rural India. Wright, who had been working with MINDS since the summer after her sophomore year, thought this was a perfect idea for a senior thesis, and jokingly told the organization that she’d “get back to them in a year.” Since then she has been studying how PTSD manifests, how dynamic nominalism affects the way symptoms come about, and feminist and post-colonial perspectives of aid-work.

Simon Chen’s focus is on a completely other part of the world. He is combining his interests as an East Asian studies and economics major to ask how specific patterns of urban planning in China are prolonging environmental problems and misuse of resources. While American cities become increasingly less urban as one leaves the city center, Chen pointed to the popular model of urban sprawl and in China, and the mass environmental resources it takes up.

Simon Chen’s focus is on a completely other part of the world. He is combining his interests as an East Asian studies and economics major to ask how specific patterns of urban planning in China are prolonging environmental problems and misuse of resources. While American cities become increasingly less urban as one leaves the city center, Chen pointed to the popular model of urban sprawl and in China, and the mass environmental resources it takes up.

WSA Hosts Student Groups Fair

The Wesleyan Student Assembly hosted the 24th Annual Student Groups Fair Sept. 18 on Andrus Field. The event provided students with an opportunity to meet with both new and established groups. The annual fair also offered students a chance to network with multiple school departments who provide a variety of programs every year. (Photos by Rebecca Goldfarb Terry '19)

The Wesleyan Student Assembly hosted the 24th Annual Student Groups Fair Sept. 18 on Andrus Field. The event provided students with an opportunity to meet with both new and established groups. The annual fair also offered students a chance to network with multiple school departments who provide a variety of programs every year. (Photos by Rebecca Goldfarb Terry ’19)

Wesleyan Advocates for Gender Equality.

Wesleyan Advocates for Gender Equality.

Wesleyan Club Soccer.

Wesleyan Club Soccer.

Milk and Choreo.

Milk and Choreo.

Co-Ed Ultimate Frisbee.

Co-Ed Ultimate Frisbee.

Outreach.

Outreach.

Hip-Hop Dance Collective.

Hip-Hop Dance Collective.

Ajua: Latino Student Association.

Ajua: Latino Student Association.

 

Relay for Life.

Relay for Life.

Explore all student groups on campus here.

Student Music Scene Celebrated at the 4th Annual Mash

On Sept. 11, the Center for the Arts celebrated the student music scene at The Mash. Inspired by Fete de la Musique, also known as World Music Day, this fourth annual festival highlights Wesleyan’s student musicians. The event took place inside Usdan University Center, Patricelli ’92 Theater and Crowell Concert Hall.

More than 15 bands performed including Locus, described as “one man with psychedelic textures and experimental beats;” Mom, a funky band full of post-pubescent mystery rock; Quasimodal, Wesleyan’s oldest co-ed A cappella group; Veeblefetzer, Wesleyan’s finest Klezmer ensemble; Lo-Qi, a rap duo “here to denounce corporate oppression;” Sleep Kid, a sea-punk group of musicians and magicians; Slavei, a group inspired by music of Europe, the Balkans, and Caucasus Georgia; and Sloopy Coos Canyon, who performs “pretty happy stuff about sometimes sad things,” among others.

Photos of The Mash are below and in this Wesleyan University Facebook set. (Photos by Will Barr ’18, Ryan Heffernan ’16, Hannah Norman ’16 and Rebecca Goldfarb Terry ’19)

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Springtime Arrives at Wes

Spring weather arrived at Wesleyan this week, and both students and faculty took advantage of the warm temperatures to spend some quality time outdoors. (Photos by Laurie Kenney)

Sophie Massey '15

Sophie Massey ’15

Students Gather to Mourn Kenyan Victims

On April 9, more than 200 students gathered at Olin Library for a vigil to remember the 147 people—most of them students—killed in the massacre at Garissa University College in Kenya earlier this month. Speakers at the vigil included Arnelle Williams ’17, Giselle Torres ’16, Claudia Kahindi ’18, Geofrey Yatich ’17, Ismael Coleman ’15, Nyanen Deng ’17, Alexandria Williams ’15, and Irvine Peck’s-Agaya ’18.

The vigil was organized to remember those who lost their lives, to raise awareness on campus about issues that happen internationally, to challenge the idea that some news is considered more worthy than others, and to engage the idea that Black Lives Matter--and all lives matter--not only in the U.S., but around the world. Arnelle Williams '17 speaks to the vigil crowd.

The vigil was organized to remember those who lost their lives, to raise awareness on campus about issues that happen internationally, to challenge the idea that some news is considered more worthy than others, and to engage the idea that Black Lives Matter–and all lives matter–not only in the U.S., but around the world. Arnelle Williams ’17 speaks to the vigil crowd.

Geofrey Yatich '17 addresses the crowd from a podium showing just a handful of the many people killed at Garissa University College in Kenya.

Geofrey Yatich ’17 addresses the crowd from a podium showing just a handful of the many people killed at Garissa University College in Kenya.

Wesleyan Community Celebrates Students During Foss Hill Day

Foss Hill Day at Wesleyan, April 2, 2015. (Photo by Olivia Drake MALS '08)

Foss Hill has been a central part of the Wesleyan experience for generations of students. Pictured, students enjoy the afternoon on Foss Hill during Foss Hill Day April 2.

More than 860 alumni made gifts on Foss Hill Day.

More than 860 members of the Wesleyan community contributed to the success of Foss Hill Day.

On April 2, the Wesleyan community celebrated the inaugural Foss Hill Day. The theme of the day was “Foss Hill: Our Common Ground.” Foss Hill reminds Wesleyan students and alumni of their common purpose: supporting students and the future of liberal arts education at Wesleyan.

On campus, Wesleyan hosted an information booth behind Usdan University Center. Staff passed out flying disks and other Foss Hill Day memorabilia, provided cake, games and raffle prizes.

More than 860 members of the Wesleyan community contributed to the success of Foss Hill Day. Tom Kelly ’73 provided a challenge grant to inspire others to give.

Click image to view full Foss Hill: A Brief History infographic.

Click image to view full Foss Hill: A Brief History infographic.

“I want to thank everyone who celebrated Foss Hill Day by participating in campus activities, sharing thoughts online, volunteering time, or making a gift,” said Wesleyan President Michael Roth. “Whenever you give — on Foss Hill Day or at any time — you make the Wesleyan experience better for our students and help ensure that they are prepared to make a positive difference in the world.”

Learn more about the event on the Foss Hill Day website.

More photos of Foss Hill Day are below: (Photos by Olivia Drake MALS ’08)

Foss Hill Day at Wesleyan, April 2, 2015. (Photo by Olivia Drake MALS '08)