Tag Archive for students

Burgunder ’15 Competes in Ski Mountaineering World Championships

Mateusz “Matt” Burgunder ’15

Mateusz “Matt” Burgunder ’15

Mateusz “Matt” Burgunder ’15 recently competed in the 2015 Ski Mountaineering World Championships in Verbier, Switzerland where the U.S. National Ski Mountaineering Team finished in 10th place overall.

This was Burgunder’s fourth time competing for the U.S., participating in three events. Competitors race by climbing up and skiing down mountains at a rate of approximately 3,000 feet per hour.

The 2015 Ski Mountaineering World Championships, hosted by the International Ski Mountaineering Federation, were held Feb. 6–12.

More information about the U.S. Ski Mountaineering Association and the 2015 World Championships can be found online.

See photos of Burgunder’s events below:

Co-Op Provides Local, Sustainable Food Options

The student-run Wesleyan Local Food Co-op sources a large variety of fresh local foods, including Long Lane Farm produce, and distributes them on campus. Besides produce, the co-op distributes fresh dairy products (milk, cheese, yogurt and butter), meat, eggs, tofu, seitan, granola, bread and coffee, all locally grown, roasted or made.

The program began solely for students but is now open to staff and faculty participation in the wake of expressed interest. More than 500 members of the Wesleyan community are part of one or more co-ops.

Participants pick up shares Wednesday evenings in Usdan and help once each semester with organization and distribution. For more information e-mail wesleyanlocalcoop@gmail.com.

Photos of the Co-op in February are below: (Photos by Aviva Hirsch ’16)

eve_coop_2015-0218180626

eve_coop_2015-0218180733

WeSlam Poetry Team Takes Victory at Regional Slam

Wesleyan's slam poets competed against five other teams.

Wesleyan’s slam poets competed against five other teams.

Wesleyan’s Slam Poetry Team, WeSlam, took first place at the Yale Regional Poetry Slam Feb. 28 in New Haven, Conn. Wesleyan competed against five other teams from Yale, Brown University, Columbia/Barnard, Middlebury College and Emerson College.

“Our team brought important pieces about racial and religious identity, sexual violence across the gender binary, and gender roles,” said former WeSlam member Mike Rosen ’11, who serves as the team’s advisor.

Poets include Giorgia Peckman ’18, Jon Logan-Rung ’18, Hazem Fahmy ’17, Rick Manayan ’17 and Max Friedlich ’17.

Fahmy received a standing ovation for his poem about popular culture’s portrayal of Islam.

For more information on WeSlam, email WeSlam.wesleyan@gmail.com.

Student-Run Espwesso Expands Hours, Welcomes Middletown Community

Emily Pfoutz '16 and Rick Manayan '17 busily make and distribute drinks at Espwesso, Wesleyan's student run cafe.

Rick Manayan ’17 and Emily Pfoutz ’16 busily make and distribute drinks at Espwesso, Wesleyan’s student run café.

Backpack-clad students shuffle into a sunlit room on the first floor of the Allbritton Center, greeted by the scent of freshly brewed coffee and a menu brimming of specialty tea and espresso drinks. It’s Saturday morning, and as of earlier this month, Espwesso, Wesleyan’s only student-run café, has expanded its hours to cater to its Middletown customers.

Espwesso is open 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday; 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. on Sunday; and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday through Thursday.

Espwesso is open 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday; 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. on Sunday; and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday through Thursday.

“Our regulars, and people who before couldn’t be our regulars because of the late night hours, are very excited,” said manager Jasmine Masand ‘15.

Now, the hotspot for delicious fair trade coffee is open for business from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Saturday and Sunday. These new hours are in addition to the former schedule: 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. on Sunday; and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday through Thursday.

The movement to expand hours began last year and was spearheaded by former manager Jacob Eichengreen ‘13 and Wesleyan Student Assembly Vice President Andrew Trexler ‘14. The goal of the expansion, Masand says, was to respond to what the community wants: an accessible spot to drink quality coffee for those who aren’t keen on late night caffeine.

“And we also wanted to open up a space where faculty and staff can come in too,” said rising manager Emily Pfoutz ‘16. “There isn’t really a place where faculty and students can interact naturally.”

Already, Espwesso is beginning to see a different kind of crowd during their expanded hours, including many more non-students, both from the faculty and a few from the Middletown community.

“There’s no Starbucks in town; it’s hard to find good coffee,

Steinberg ’16 Studies Effects of Artificial Feeders on Hummingbird Diversity, Interactions in Costa Rica

Hannah Steinberg '16 studied hummingbirds in Monteverde, Costa Rica  through the School for Field Studies.

Hannah Steinberg ’16 studied hummingbirds in Monteverde, Costa Rica through the School for Field Studies.

#THISISWHY
In this Q&A, we speak with Hannah Steinberg from the Class of 2016.

Q: Hannah, you studied abroad through the School for Field Studies’ (SFS) Costa Rica program in Spring 2014. Why did you choose this program and why did you decide to conduct research during your study abroad experience?

A: I chose SFS Costa Rica because I wanted to go to Latin America to improve my Spanish skills and get practical hands-on experience in biological science. Another cool part of the program was that it was situated on a sustainable orange and mango farm in central Costa Rica, but also took us on field trips around the country, and even to Nicaragua for a week.

Q: You were one of six students to receive SFS’s Distinguished Student Research Award this month. Please tell us about your research project, “Effect of Artificial Feeders on Hummingbird Diversity and Level of Interactions in Monteverde, Costa Rica.”

A: My research project was part of an ongoing study of the ecology of hummingbirds

Screenwriters Lounge Supports Student Filmmaking on Campus

Members of the Wesleyan Film Project’s Screenwriters Lounge gathered at the Shapiro Creative Writing Center’s library Feb. 16 to discuss current projects. The Wesleyan Film Project is a student-run group that formed during the fall semester 2014 and supports filmmaking on campus. During Screenwriter’s Lounge sessions the students meet with each other, writers, directors and producers to review student-submitted scripts in order to prepare them for production.

For more information on the group, visit the Wesleyan Film Project on Facebook.

Photos of the Screenwriters Lounge gathering are below: (Photos by John Van Vlack)

stu_wor_2015-0216214252

Students Travel to Puerto Rico to Develop Research Skills

The group photo of the earth and environmental science team.  The group travelled to Puerto Rico in January to develop their research skills.

Twenty-one students, two faculty and one guest traveled to Puerto Rico in January. Students honed their research skills while on the chain of islands.

This semester, 21 senior earth and environmental science majors in the Senior Field Research Project (EES 398) course traveled to Puerto Rico to develop their research, data collection, analytical and presentation skills.

Students gathered samples in a bat cave while wading through inches of bat guano.

Students gathered samples in a bat cave while wading through inches of bat guano.

As part of the EES Department’s capstone course sequence, students are required to participate in a series of student-designed research projects. From Jan. 12-19, students performed independent research in the field.

“The overarching spirit is to have students participate in the full arc of a research project: from the design all the way to the presentation of the results,” said Dana Royer, associate professor of earth and environmental sciences, associate professor of environmental studies. Royer has co-taught the class three times, this year with Suzanne O’Connell, professor of earth and environmental sciences, faculty director of the Ronald E. McNair Post Baccalaureate Achievement Program.

Government Major Sveen Promotes Political Diversity on Campus through the Wesleyan Republican Committee

Emmakristina Sveen '17, of Denver, co-founded the Wesleyan Republican Committee this fall. The group now has more than 75 active members.

Emmakristina Sveen ’17, of Denver, Colo. co-founded the Wesleyan Republican Committee this fall. The group now has more than 75 active members. (Photos by Olivia Drake)

In this Q&A we speak with Emmakristina Sveen from the Class of 2017.

Q: How and when did you form the Wesleyan Republican Committee (WRC)?

A: Meghan Kelly ’17 and I founded the Wesleyan Republican Committee this fall. The previous Republican student group on campus, which was started in 2009, gradually deteriorated after the 2012 elections and after their senior leadership graduated. We wanted to establish a club that served as a vehicle in which students with any level of affiliation with the Republican Party could discuss their political views in a safe environment. With the help of Meghan’s brother, who served as chairman of the College Republican chapter at Northeastern, we received our charter from the College Republican National Committee and the Connecticut Federation of College Republicans. We are now the largest College Republican chapter in the state of Connecticut.

Q: Wesleyan has a reputation as being a rather liberal institution. Was political diversity a consideration for you in choosing a college, and how did you feel about Wesleyan?

A: Wesleyan is an incredibly liberal institution,

Faculty, Students Invited to Workshops on Contemplative Pedagogy Feb. 19

How do faculty help students, and themselves, thread a path through an ever-growing body of information? What practices can faculty and students find that enable them to bring a clear and sustained focus to their work in the classroom and the laboratory?

Through two workshops and discussions, held Feb. 19, participants can consider how one might approach teaching from a contemplative perspective, in both the long and short term. Faculty and students will experiment with the adaptation of several traditional contemplative practices to classroom situations including “stilling” (breath and body awareness), contemplative writing, “beholding,” and explore how these might be instantiated in a classroom, laboratory or personal practice.

Michelle Francl

Michelle Francl

Michelle Francl, professor of chemistry on the Clowes Fund for Science and Public Policy at Bryn Mawr College, will lead the workshops along with Wesleyan faculty and staff. Francl is a quantum chemist who has published in areas ranging from the development of methods for computational chemistry to the structures of topologically intriguing molecules. She takes a contemplative approach to both, introducing students to practices to help them find stillness and focus, including contemplative writing, and feels strongly that a pedagogical stance that recognizes the role contemplation plays in research and writing — scientific or otherwise — has the potential to deepen students engagement in their work.

“Studies show that contemplative pedagogy – a teaching method to integrate secular meditation and mindfulness into the classroom – can help improve cognitive and academic performance,”

Video: Wesleyan Student Assembly Hosts Student Activities Fair

On Feb. 5, the Wesleyan Student Assembly (WSA) Community Committee (CoCo) hosted a Student Activities Fair in Beckham Hall. This video documents the diverse range of clubs at Wesleyan, including activism, interests, identities, politics, publications, sports and more. The purpose of this fair was to create a centralized location where clubs could promote themselves to students who may not be aware of what this diverse campus has to offer.

CoCo is chaired by Elizabeth Shackney ’17, who is featured in the video that can be seen below:

YouTube Preview Image

Students Take Semester-Long Class in 2 Weeks during Winter Session

cls_win_2015-0116135710

Wesleyan’s Winter Session, held Jan. 9-20, provided students with an opportunity to take a full-semester course in only two weeks. The immersion courses offer full credit and allow students to build a close relationship with faculty and each other.

Students completed reading and writing assignments before class started.

Pictured below are scenes from Winter Session’s ENGL234: Jane Austen and the Romantic Age course (taught by Stephanie Weiner, professor of English) and GOVT311: United States Foreign Policy course (taught by Doug Foyle, associate professor of government, tutor in the College of Social Studies). (Photos by Olivia Drake)