Tag Archive for writers

Registration Open for Wesleyan Writers Conference

Both experienced writers and new writers are welcome to participate in the Wesleyan Writers Conference this June.  Special topics include selling your book and writing for film, science and medicine and social issues.

Both experienced writers and new writers are welcome to participate in the Wesleyan Writers Conference this June. Special topics include selling your book and writing for film, science and medicine and social issues. Manuscript consultations and publishing advice are key parts of the program.

Registration is now open for the 58th annual Wesleyan Writers Conference, one of the nation’s leading programs, to be held on campus June 11-15. Both experienced writers and new writers are welcome. This is a time to start a new project or develop your current work with the help of the conference’s faculty, distinguished writers who work closely with participants. Manuscript consultations and publishing advice are key parts of the program. Participants may attend daily seminars in the novel, short story, poetry, and nonfiction (including memoir and literary journalism), and the program also includes guest speakers, readings, workshops, panel discussions and talks with editors and agents. Special topics include writing for film, writing about science and medicine, writing about social issues and how to sell your book.

“Writing is often lonely work,” said Anne Greene, director of the Wesleyan Writers Conference, director of Writing Programs. “It can be transforming to spend a few days outside of your writing room talking to people who share your interests. Former participants say they’re still in close touch with friends and writing colleagues they met at the conference, and they find these connections invaluable.”

Scibona Honored with Writing, Book Publishing Award

Salvatore Scibona

Salvatore Scibona

Salvatore Scibona, the Frank B. Weeks Visiting Assistant Professor of English, is the winner of this year’s Ellen Levine Fund for Writers Award for his novel-in-progress Where In the World Is William Wurs?

The award is sponsored by the New York Community Trust and the Ellen Levine Fund for Writers. Members of the Teachers and Writers Collaborative nominated Scibona for the award, which comes with a $7,500 grant. Awards go an author who has previously published a print edition of one or two books of fiction, and who doesn’t currently have a publishing contract for a second or third book of fiction.

Scibona’s first novel, The End, was a finalist for the National Book Award and winner of the Young Lions Fiction Award from the New York Public Library. The End is published or forthcoming in seven languages. A former FAWC Fellow and a graduate of St. John’s College and the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, Scibona has been awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship, an O. Henry Award, a Pushcart Prize and a Whiting Writers’ Award.

In 2010 he was named one of the New Yorker’s “20 Under 40” writers to watch. His short fiction has appeared in The New Yorker, A Public Space and Harper’s. Scibona also will leading seminars at the 2014 Wesleyan Writers Conference.

Ellen Levine, award-winning author, teacher, mentor and social justice advocate, died in 2012.

Editors, Journalists, Writing Fellows to Teach Wesleyan Writers Conference

Anyone interested in the writer's craft is welcome to attend the Wesleyan Writers Conference.

Well-known and award-winning novelists, journalists, publishers and editors will be on the faculty of the 56th Annual Wesleyan Writers Conference, held June 14-17 on campus.

The conference welcomes both experienced writers and new writers.

“Our distinguished faculty offer careful attention to your work and will offer an array of seminars, readings, and panel discussions, all designed to move your work forward, or help you launch a new project,” explains Anne Greene, director of the Wesleyan Writers Conference, director of Writing Programs.

Over the years, conference participants have gone on to win a number of awards, including the Pulitzer Prize, Whiting Writers’ Award, and nomination for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize.

The Writers Conference features seminars, workshops and panels on novel writing, short stories, poetry, nonfiction, journalism, film and TV, new media, publishing, tips on how to sell your book and talks with agents and editors. Faculty will speak on writing for the stage, writing about science and medicine, short and long form journalism, the future of publishing in the electronic age and more.

The Wesleyan Writers Conference also will host a special one-day festival on Saturday, June 16.

Each member of the conference faculty leads a daily seminar, usually including a short lecture, discussion, and (optional) writing exercises. Participants will be given ample time to develop their own writing in quiet spaces and the Wesleyan libraries.

The faculty include novelists Roxana Robinson, Wells Tower ’96, Kit Reed, Peter Blauner ’82, and Amy Bloom ’75; poet Honor Moore; and nonfiction writers/ journalists Lis Harris, Peg Tyre and William Finnegan of The New Yorker. Publishers, editors and agents include Pamela Dorman ’79 of Viking Press; Stuart Krichevsky; Andre Bernard  of the Guggenheim Foundation; Johnny Temple ’88 of Akashic Books; Bill Contardi; and others. View the faculty member bios online here.

View a video of the Writers Conference below:

55th Wesleyan Writers Conference Convenes in June

Publisher Pamela Dorman '79, vice-president of Pamela Dorman Books/Viking of New York, N.Y., will be on the faculty of the 55th Annual Wesleyan Writers Conference. (Photo by Olivia Drake)

For more than five decades, late spring has been a season for writing at Wesleyan, and a distinguished cohort of literary talents will assemble in Middletown next month for the 55th annual Wesleyan Writers Conference.

Roxana Robinson, Amy Bloom, Honor Moore and Arthur Phillips – whose new novel, The Tragedy of Arthur, was reviewed on the cover of the May 1 New York Times Book Review – will be among more than 20 professional literary artists, editors and publishers on campus from June 16 to June 20.

“We are very serious about the work that we do,” says Anne Greene, director of the conference, which counts literary titans Eudora Welty, Edward P. Jones, Robert Stone and David Halberstam among its past faculty.

Well established as an attraction for fiction and literary non-fiction writers, the conference this year also offers a number of new panels, including writing about science and medicine, featuring Joseph J. Fins ’82, MD, and writing for television, featuring Peter Blauner ’82. An award-winning mystery writer, Blauner now writes for Law and Order Los Angeles.

In all, about 70 writers are expected to participate this year, including  established and aspiring writers, teachers, judges, physicians, bankers and at least one former U.S. ambassador. They’ll refine their skills in close work with the professionals.

As always, students will be able to submit manuscripts for review by conference faculty and consult with them one-on-one.

A distinguished group of top editors and agents will advise participants about preparing their work for publication. Speakers include:

Pamela Dorman ’79, a veteran of Viking Penguin and Hyperion; Andre Bernard, former publisher of Harcourt Brace; Johnny Temple ’88, editor and publisher of Akashic Press; and agents John Silbersack and Mel Flashman of Trident Media.

The full conference, which has rolling admission, has a $975 tuition fee, with additional (optional) costs for meals and accommodations for five nights.

A one-day program will be held June 18.

For a schedule of the 2011 Wesleyan Writers Conference and a complete listing of faculty, see http://www.wesleyan.edu/writing/conference/.

Author Kaplan ’73 Speaks on Writing Process (with VIDEO)



James Kaplan ’73, the Writing Programs’ 2011 Joan Jakobson Visiting Writer at Wesleyan University, held a question and answer session with students Feb. 9, 2011. Kaplan has been writing about people and ideas in business and popular culture, and also writing fiction, for over three decades. (Photo by Bill Burkhart)



Jakobson Visiting Writer Kaplan ’73 to Speak Feb. 9

James Kaplan '73 (Photo by Erinn Hartman)

James Kaplan '73 (Photo by Erinn Hartman)

Author James Kaplan ’73, the Writing Programs’ 2011 Joan Jakobson Visiting Writer, will speak at 8 p.m. Feb. 9 in the Russell House.

Kaplan has been writing about people and ideas in business and popular culture, and also writing fiction, for over three decades. His essays and reviews, as well as more than a hundred major profiles of figures ranging from Madonna to Helen Gurley Brown, Calvin Klein to John Updike, Miles Davis to Meryl Streep, and Arthur Miller to Larry David, have appeared in many magazines, including The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, Vanity Fair and Esquire

In November 2010, Kaplan published an acclaimed new biography, Frank: The Voice (Doubleday), about the early life of one of America’s best known American singers and entertainers of the 20th century, Frank Sinatra, from the years 1915 through 1954. Kaplan reveals how Sinatra helped to make the act of listening to pop music a more personal experience to his fans than it had ever been before.

Michiko Kakutani of The New York Times recently chose Kaplan’s book as one of her Top 10 Books of 2010. In her review in the Times, she wrote that Kaplan “has produced a book that has all the emotional detail and narrative momentum of a novel.  …  In recounting his subject’s rise and fall and rise again — all before the age of 40 — Mr. Kaplan gives us a wonderfully vivid feel for the worlds Sinatra traversed, from Hoboken and New York to Hollywood and Las Vegas, as well as the rapidly shifting tastes in music that shaped him and were later shaped by him.”

The event is free and open to the public.

Kaplan’s talk is part of the Writing at Wesleyan Spring 2011 Russell House Series. For more information on Kaplan and other upcoming speakers go to http://www.wesleyan.edu/writing/distinguished_writers/.


George Saunders to Read Feb. 24

Writing At Wesleyan, The English Department, and the Shapiro Creative Writing Center announce the Spring Readings Series.

George Saunders is the Writing Programs’ 2010 Jacob Julien Visiting Writer.

George Saunders is the Writing Programs’ 2010 Jacob Julien Visiting Writer.

George Saunders, the Writing Programs’ 2010 Jacob Julien Visiting Writer, reads at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 24 in the Memorial Chapel. Saunders is the author of six books, including the story collection In Persuasion Nation and the book of essays Braindead Microphone. His work has appeared in The New Yorker, Harper’s, GQ, McSweeney’s, The Guardian, and other publications. He is the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship and a Guggenheim Fellowship. He teaches in Syracuse University’s MFA program. Event organized by Deb Olin Unferth and Anne Greene.

Playwright David Henry Hwang reads at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 3 in the Memorial Chapel. Hwang is best known as the author of M. Butterfly, which ran for two years on Broadway, won Tony and Drama Desk Awards, and was a Pulitzer Prize finalist. His Broadway musicals include the book for the revival of Flower Drum Song, which earned him a third Tony nomination, and Disney’s Aida, winner of four Tony Awards. As an opera librettist he has written numerous works including three with composer Philip Glass. The event is presented by Center for the Arts, co-sponsored by the Writing Programs.

Molly Haskell, The Writing Programs’ 2010 Annie Sonnenblick Lecturer, reads at 8 p.m. Wednesday, March 24 in the Memorial Chapel. She is the author of the classic work From Reverence to Rape: The Treatment of Women in the Movies. She has served as film critic for New York magazine and Vogue and written for the New York Times and New York Review of Books. Her newest book, Frankly, My Dear: Gone with the Wind Revisited, has received widespread critical acclaim. Event organized by Anne Greene.

Diane Williams reads at 8 p.m. Wednesday, April 7 in the Russell House. Williams is the author of six books of fiction, including It Was Like My Trying to Have a Tender-Hearted Nature and Excitability. She is the founding editor of the innovative literary journal NOON and a former editor of StoryQuarterly. Her fiction has appeared in numerous magazines and journals, including Harper’s and McSweeney’s. She has taught at Bard College and Syracuse University. Event organized by Deb Olin Unferth.

Poet Brenda Coultas reads at 8 p.m. Wednesday, April 14 in the Russell House. Coultas is the author of The Marvelous Bones of Time (2008) and A Handmade Museum (2003) from Coffee House Press. Coultas’s poetry is deeply invested in the local, blending lyricism with documentary reality. She is the recipient of the Norma Farber Prize from The Poetry Society of America, a New York Foundation for the Arts fellowship, and a Lower Manhattan Cultural Council residency. Event organized by Elizabeth Willis.

Winners of Wesleyan’s 2010 Writing Prizes will read at 8 p.m. Wednesday, May 5 in the Russell House. Student winners of fiction, poetry, and nonfiction awards will read from their work.  Event organized by Anne Greene.

In addition, the Center for the Arts presents Music at the Russell House.

Giacomo Gates performs Stories, Notes, Harmonies and Rhythm at 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 7 in the Russell House. Gates, jazz vocalist, is joined by guitarist Tony Lombardozzi and bassist Jeff Fuller. The trio will play repertoire from the Great American Songbook, along with music from Monk, Miles, Ellington, Gillespie, Morgan and other greats. The concert includes stories, anecdotes and historical information about the music.

Turkish-born classical guitarist Cem Duruöz will perform “A Guitar Journey” at 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 28 in the Russell House. Duruöz will play music from Spain and Turkey and tangos from Argentina.

All events are free and open to the public.  A book signing and reception follow each event.

For more information on the spring series, contact Jessica Posner, Russell House Fellow, at RussellHouse@wesleyan.edu, 860.685.3448.

For more information on the Writing Programs information Anne Greene, director of Writing Programs, agreene@wesleyan.edu, and Elizabeth Willis, Shapiro Silverberg Professor of Creative Writing, ewillis@wesleyan.edu.

Support for this series is provided by the Wesleyan Writing Programs, English Department, Center for the Arts, Wesleyan University Press, and Shapiro Creative Writing Center. We also thank the Sonnenblick and Jakobson families, Gerard Koeppel, and supporters of the Jacob Julien Fellowship and Millett Writing Fellowship.

 

Poet, Fiction Writer Speak at Distinguished Writers Series

As part of the Writing at Wesleyan Russell House Series, poet Bernadette Mayer spoke and read prose Oct. 14. Mayer is the author of more than two dozen volumes of poetry, including Midwinter Day, Sonnets, The Desires of Mothers to Please Others in Letters, and Poetry State Forest. A former director of the Poetry Project at St. Mark's Church in the Bowery and co-editor of the conceptual magazine 0 to 9, Mayer has been a key figure on the New York poetry scene for decades.

As part of the Distinguished Writers Series at Wesleyan, poet Bernadette Mayer spoke and read prose Oct. 14. Mayer is the author of more than two dozen volumes of poetry, including Midwinter Day, Sonnets, The Desires of Mothers to Please Others in Letters, and Poetry State Forest. A former director of the Poetry Project at St. Mark's Church in the Bowery and co-editor of the conceptual magazine 0 to 9, Mayer has been a key figure on the New York poetry scene for decades.

Mayer's visit was organized by Elizabeth Willis, the Shapiro-Silverberg Associate Professor of Creative Writing, associate professor of English.

Mayer's visit was organized by Elizabeth Willis, the Shapiro-Silverberg Associate Professor of Creative Writing, associate professor of English.

Fiction writer John Brandon spoke on Oct. 21. Brandon is the author of the novel Arkansas and the forthcoming novel The Semester. He is currently the Grisham Writer-in-Residence at University of Mississippi.

Fiction writer John Brandon spoke on Oct. 21. Brandon is the author of the novel Arkansas and the forthcoming novel The Semester. He is currently the Grisham Writer-in-Residence at University of Mississippi.

Brandon's visit was organized by Deb Olin Unferth, assistant professor of English. (Photos by Jeffrey Katzin '10)

Brandon's visit was organized by Deb Olin Unferth, assistant professor of English. (Photos by Jeffrey Katzin '10)

For more information on the Distinguished Writers Series go to: http://www.wesleyan.edu/writing/distinguished_writers/

Reed Guest Author at Festival of Reading

Kit Reed

Kit Reed

Kit Reed, resident writer in the English Department, participated in the 17th Annual Festival of Reading in St. Petersburg, Fla., Oct. 24.  Reed was one of dozens of authors who spoke to the community about a particular book.

According to the St. Petersburg Times Festival author biography, Reed is “One of our brightest cultural commentators. ” Often anthologized, her short stories appear in venues ranging from The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Asimov’s SF and Omni to The Yale Review, The Kenyon Review and The Norton Anthology of American Literature.

During the festival, Reed spoke about her book, Enclave.