Tag Archive for Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life

Earth Month Activities Include Speakers, Films

Lynda Nead of the University of London will speak April 14 on "The Tiger in the Smoke: The Aesthetics of Fog in Post-War Britain c. 1945-55" as part of a series of Earth Month events at Wesleyan.

Lynda Nead of the University of London will speak April 14 on “The Tiger in the Smoke: The Aesthetics of Fog in Post-War Britain c. 1945-55” as part of a series of Earth Month events at Wesleyan.

In honor of Earth Month, Wesleyan will host a series of speakers and films beginning April 14.

At 4:15 p.m. on April 14, the College of the Environment will present a talk, “The Tiger in the Smoke: The Aesthetics of Fog in Post-War Britain c. 1945-55,” by Lynda Nead, the Pevsner Professor of History of Art at Birkbeck, University of London. The talk will be in 41 Wyllys, Room 112. It is cosponsored by the Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life; the Mellon Fund for Lectures in Ethics, Politics and Social Issues; Art History; History; and the Science in Society Program. The event is free and open to the public.

Allbritton Center to Present Three Panels on “Drugs, Harm and the Campus”

This month, the Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life is presenting three linked panels in its Right Now! series titled “Drugs, Harm and the Campus.”

Drug Use @ Wes

At 4:30 on April 7, Michael Whaley, vice president for student affairs, will moderate a panel discussion, “What are we doing about drugs at Wes and why?” Tanya Purdy, director of health education at WesWELL; Beth DeRicco, higher education outreach at Caron Treatment Centers; and Ashley Fine ’15 will discuss education, support and policies at Wesleyan. The event will be held in PAC 002.

Obama’s “Auto Czar” Rob Bloom ’77 to Speak on Campus April 8

Ron Bloom '77

Ron Bloom ’77

The Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life welcomes “auto czar” Ron Bloom ’77 to campus April 8.

Bloom will speak on “We almost lost Detroit: A hopeful tale about cars, crises, cities and America,” at 7:30 p.m. in PAC 001.

After graduating from Wesleyan with a BA in history in 1977, Bloom received an MBA with distinction from the Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration in 1985. After working as the assistant to the president for United Steelworkers, Bloom was appointed by President Obama be the senior advisor to the Secretary of the Treasury on the President’s Task Force on the Automotive Industry. In this role, the “auto czar” presided over the restructuring of General Motors and Chrysler as the government attempted to bail out both companies.

In 2011, he worked as the assistant to the president for manufacturing policy at the White House, providing leadership on policy development and strategic planning for the administration’s agenda to revitalize the manufacturing sector. Bloom led the discussions with the auto industry which resulted in the industry’s support for new standards that will double the fuel economy of cars and light trucks, saving consumers over $1.7 trillion and reducing oil consumption by 2 million barrels per day.

Bloom currently is vice chairman of U.S. Investment Banking at Lazard where he focuses on mergers and acquisitions, restricting and infrastructure.

On April 29, 2010, he was named as one of Time Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People in the World in the category of World Leaders. In the Time 100 issue, Bill Saporito wrote that “his role in brokering the rescue of General Motors and Chrysler while preserving more than 100,000 jobs demanded a synergist who could work both sides of the equation with authority and respect.”

In addition to the evening talk, Bloom will meet with students enrolled in Professor of History Ron Schatz’s American Labor History class, and also with selected students and faculty in Woodhead Lounge at 4:30 p.m. Anyone interested in participating in the informal conversation should RSVP to Rob Rosenthal, director of the Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life, at rrosenthal@wesleyan.edu.

Center for Community Partnerships Celebrates 10 Years

Wesleyan’s Center for Community Partnerships celebrated its 10th year anniversary on April 8. The CCP, located inside the Allbritton Center, serves the development of both the individual and the community and is guided by principles of mutual respect and shared responsibility. The different offices that combine to constitute the CCP are the Service-Learning Center, the Office of Community Service and Volunteerism, the Office of Community Relations, the Green Street Arts Center/PIMMS, and the Center for Prison Education.

Each office within the CCP connects Wesleyan to surrounding communities. The Service-Learning Center integrates experiences outside the classroom with an academic curriculum taught within the classroom to broaden students’ understanding of course content in virtually any discipline through activities that are simultaneously of service to the community. The Office of Community Service and Volunteerism fosters Community building within the University and with the communities of Middletown and Middlesex County, maintaining the spirit of public service at Wesleyan by offering opportunities to participate in volunteer work, providing work-study placements, and supporting student-sponsored social action initiatives. The Office of Community Relations aims to enhance and maintain collaborative initiatives between Wesleyan and the greater Middletown community and beyond while developing and strengthening partnerships within the Wesleyan campus by working closely with the other offices in the CCP as well as other partners on- and off-campus such as the Upward Bound programs. The Green Street Arts Center/PIMMS offers programs for the youth and educators of Middletown and greater Connecticut, offering opportunities for Wesleyan students and working with faculty members on the broader impacts of their research. And the Center for Prison Education offers a high-caliber liberal arts education inside prison walls, advancing Wesleyan’s commitment to civic engagement by offering college courses to incarcerated individuals in order to enrich the lives of those who are systematically denied access to educational opportunities.

Read past stories about the Center for Community Partnerships here.

Photos of the 10th year anniversary are below:

eve_CenterforCommunityPartnership_2014-0408183447

Rob Rosenthal, the John E. Andrus Professor of Sociology, will serve as Director of the Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life for a three-year term, beginning July 2014. Rosenthal is the founding director of the Center for Service Learning, founding co-director the Center for Community Partnerships, and helped institute the Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship.

Several faculty, staff and students attended the celebration.

Several faculty, staff and students attended the celebration.

Rosenthal to Direct Allbritton Center 2014-17

Rob Rosenthal

Rob Rosenthal

Rob Rosenthal, the John E. Andrus Professor of Sociology, will serve as Director of the Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life for a three-year term, beginning July 2014.

Rosenthal has a distinguished history of initiating programs to integrate public life into the Wesleyan curriculum: He was the founding director of the Center for Service Learning, founding co-director the Center for Community Partnerships, and as Provost he instituted the Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship and developed new programming within the Allbritton Center including the year-long “music in public life” initiative.

Rosenthal served as provost from 2010-2013 and oversaw Wesleyan’s reaccreditation process. Immediately before becoming provost, he served as vice-chair then chair of the faculty. He has served as chair of the Sociology Department and been elected to the Advisory Committee and the Educational Policy Committee. His numerous awards include Wesleyan’s Binswanger Prize for Excellence in Teaching; the “Leadership in Community Service” award from the Connecticut Department of Higher Education; a Fulbright teaching grant to teach at Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece; the Distinguished Service award from The Connection; and he was co-winner of the Association of Humanist Sociology’s 1994-1995 book award for Homeless in Paradise.

In Rosenthal’s most recent project, he collected and co-edited musician and activist Pete Seeger’s private writings; the book, Pete Seeger: In His Own Words, was published in 2012 to much accolade. Rosenthal is also author of Playing for Change: Music in the Service of Social Movements (with Dick Flacks); Homeless in Paradise: A Map of the Terrain; and more than 20 articles and essays.  He is also a producer, musician, and musical researcher on three recordings: Seattle 1919, Reagonomics Blues, and We Won’t Move: Songs of the Tenants’ Movement.

13 Seniors Present Theses at Study for Public Life Presentation

Government major Ivan Stoitzev '13 presented his research on “Everything Revolves Around Oil and Natural Gas: Russia’s Economic and Political Centers of Gravity,” during the Center for the Study of Public Life's 2012-13 thesis research presentations on April 26. Stoitev investigated the role oil and natural gas play in the Russian economy and political sphere.

Government major Ivan Stoitzev ’13 presented his research on “Everything Revolves Around Oil and Natural Gas: Russia’s Economic and Political Centers of Gravity,” during the Center for the Study of Public Life’s 2012-13 thesis research presentations on April 26. Stoitev investigated the role oil and natural gas play in the Russian economy and political sphere.

The Center for the Study of Public Life’s profiled a range of Wesleyan senior thesis research projects on topics related to the study of public life on April 26.

The inaugural event featured 10-minute presentations by Wesleyan seniors whose 2012-13 thesis research represents an undertaking to pursue knowledge about public life in its broad definition.

Three students spoke about the topic “Regionalism, Nationalism, Infrastructures and Identity.”

And history major Sophia Hussain discussed “The Derailed Power Broker: Rexford Tugwell's American Crusade for Planning and Professional Authority,”

History major Sophia Hussain discussed “The Derailed Power Broker: Rexford Tugwell’s American Crusade for Planning and Professional Authority.”

Government major Katherine James spoke on “Policy and Planning for Large Water Infrastructure Projects in the People’s Republic of China,”a study of three water projects – the South-to-North Water Transfer Project, the Three Gorges Dam, and the Nu River Project- that explores how and why China has persisted with a policy of constructing mega-projects to assuage domestic water scarcity and supply issues, in spite of their high social, political, economic, and environmental costs.

Government major Ivan Stoitzev ’13 presented his research on “Everything Revolves Around Oil and Natural Gas: Russia’s Economic and Political Centers of Gravity,” during the Center for the Study of Public Life’s 2012-13 thesis research presentations on April 26. Stoitev investigated the role oil and natural gas play in the Russian economy and political sphere.

And history major Sophia Hussain discussed “The Derailed Power Broker: Rexford Tugwell’s American Crusade for Planning and Professional Authority,” a historical investigation of the agricultural economist’s public writings and his relationship to the New Deal, racial politics, and the building of America’s first Greenbelt Towns in the 1930s.

Four students discussed studies about “Policy and Political Processes.”

College of Social Studies major Caitlin Aylward presented “Food for People, Not for Profit: Justice and the Food Movement,” a study of how the predominant food justice, slow food, and food sovereignty movements are each a response to a respective element within a triad of distributional, recognition based and procedural injustices.

Tucker to Serve as Interim Director of Allbritton Center

Jennifer Tucker is chair and associate professor of feminist, gender and sexuality studies, associate professor of history, associate professor of science in society.

Jennifer Tucker is chair and associate professor of feminist, gender and sexuality studies, associate professor of history, associate professor of science in society.

Jennifer Tucker will serve as interim director of the Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life, beginning immediately through the end of the fall 2013 semester. Tucker has accepted this position in order to enable the faculty and the university to formulate a vision for the Allbritton Center that will engage the curriculum and faculty scholarship, and enhance the intellectual life of the university. Her work this year will provide a framework for strategic planning and guide the search for a new director.

Tucker is chair and associate professor of feminist, gender and sexuality studies, associate professor of history, associate professor of science in society.

Tucker received her M.A. in history and Philosophy of Science from the University of Cambridge, and her Ph.D. in the history of science, medicine, and technology from Johns Hopkins University. Her research interests at Wesleyan include the history of science and technology, Victorian visual culture, photographic truth and evidence, early science film history and spectatorship, gender and science, and the links between art and the popularization of science in the British Empire.

She is the author of Nature Exposed: Photography as Eyewitness in Victorian Science (Johns Hopkins University, 2006), editor of a special theme issue of History and Theory on “Photography and Historical Interpretation” (Dec. 2009), and author of more than 15 articles and book chapters on topics including scientific ballooning, visual history and the archive, photographic evidence in Victorian law, and the relationship between gender and genre in 19th Century European scientific illustration. Her research and teaching have been supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, Social Science Research Council, Marshall Scholarship Foundation, American Council of Learned Societies, and National Science Foundation, among others.

Her current project, “The Art and Visual Politics of the Tichborne Claimant Affair,” excavates hundreds of photographs, engravings, and other visual materials that circulated around the time of the high-profile trial in order to show how the physical movement of photographs and other visual materials through time and space shaped the public meaning of the case from the beginning. She is the image editor for History and Technology journal and a member of the Radical History Review editorial collective.

“Please join me in thanking Jennifer for accepting this position; and please join her in conversation as she begins to work with departments and programs and other colleagues to begin the transformation of the Allbritton Center into the leading regional center for the study of public life,” said Rob Rosenthal, provost and vice president for academic affairs, the John E. Andrus Professor of Sociology.

Read a “5 Questions With . . .” piece on Tucker in this past Wesleyan Connection article.

Bloom ’75 Named to New Writer-in-Residence Position

Amy Bloom '75, appointed as the Kim-Frank Family University Writer in Residence, read from her latest book, Where the God of Love Hangs Out, April 13 in New York City at "A Conversation with Amy Bloom '75 and President Michael Roth '78." The event was sponsored by the Wesleyan Club of New York and the Wesleyan Writing Programs. (Photo by Bill Burkhart)

Amy Bloom ’75, a distinguished writer of novels, short stories, nonfiction, and projects for television, has been named the Kim-Frank Family University Writer in Residence at Wesleyan University. Her appointment takes effect July 1.

Bloom will have an office in the Shapiro Creative Writing Center.

Bloom will enhance Wesleyan’s curricular offerings in writing by offering two courses per year, and she will serve as a senior thesis advisor. She will have an office in the Shapiro Creative Writing Center.

“Amy Bloom is one of the most accomplished writers in the United States today,” says President Michael S. Roth. “Her insight, her creativity, and her deep understanding of the craft of writing will be a great benefit to our students. The writing community at Wesleyan is prolific and strong, and Amy Bloom’s presence will add to that vitality.”

Bloom is the author of two novels, three collections of short stories, and a nonfiction book. She has been a nominee for both the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award. Her stories have appeared in The Best American Short Stories, Prize Stories: The O. Henry Awards, and numerous anthologies here and abroad.

Feminism, Nationalism in India Topic of Diane Weiss Lecture

Ania Loomba, Catherine Bryson Professor of English, University of Pennsylvania, spoke on “Four Lives, feminism, nationalism and communism in India,” during the 23rd Annual Diane Weiss ’80 Memorial Lecture in the Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life.

Photos of Loomba’s talk are below: (Photos by Stefan Weinberger ’10)

Ania Loomba, Catherine Bryson Professor of English, University of Pennsylvania, spoked on "Four Lives, feminism, nationalism and communism in India," during the 23rd Annual Diane Weiss '80 Memorial Lecture in the Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life.

Allbritton Center Honored with Gold Certification for Sustainable Practices

The Allbritton Center, formerly the Davenport Campus Center, was a renovation project completed in August 2009. Wesleyan considered sustainable measures throughout the redesign and construction, earning a Gold Certification from the U.S. Green Building Council. (Photo by Olivia Bartlett Drake)

The Allbritton Center, formerly the Davenport Campus Center, was a renovation project completed in August 2009. Wesleyan considered sustainable measures throughout the redesign and construction, earning a Gold Certification from the U.S. Green Building Council. (Photo by Olivia Bartlett Drake)

Wesleyan has reached the gold standard in sustainable structures.

On March 15, the U.S. Green Building Council awarded Wesleyan’s newly-renovated Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life building a Gold Certification based on the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) standards.

LEED is an internationally-recognized green building certification system that verifies that a building or community was designed and built using strategies aimed at improving performance across all the metrics that matter most: energy savings, water efficiency, CO2 emissions reduction, improved indoor environmental quality, and stewardship of resources and sensitivity to their impacts.

“The Gold Certification demonstrates Wesleyan’s commitment to sustainable design, operation and maintenance of its buildings,” says Alan Rubacha, construction services consultant for the center. “From the salvage and reuse of existing materials, to the design and specification of new materials and even into the site design, LEED was consulted for every decision.”

The Allbritton Center, formerly the Davenport Campus Center, was a nine-month renovation project completed in August 2009.

LEED awards points based

Price Appointed Coordinator of Internships

Melanye Price.

Melanye Price.

Melanye Price, adjunct associate professor of government, has been appointed to coordinator of internships for the Center for the Study of Public Life.  This half-time position will be focused on developing new internship opportunities for Wesleyan undergraduates.

Housed within the Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life, the appointment complements Price’s continued teaching and scholarly work in the Department of Government. She assumed this new role in January.

Price will be working with members of the Career Resource Center to develop the program, and to coordinate with the Educational Policy Committee and academic departments. She also will be consulting with peer institutions and potential internship sponsors.

The availability of internships is very important to many Wesleyan students, who view them as the perfect opportunity to apply their education to specific projects of interest. At the same time, host organizations are ever more keenly interested in providing an internship experience that is fully integrated into the student’s academic work. In her new role, Price will seek additional internship opportunities for Wesleyan students, work with hosts and faculty colleagues to ensure that these placements are consistent with Wesleyan’s educational mission and standards, and collaborate with colleagues in the Career Resource Center to ensure that students are aware of opportunities and encouraged to pursue them when appropriate for their academic and career goals.

Students interested in contacting Melanye Price may do so via e-mail at mprice@wesleyan.edu. Her office is located in Room 117 in the Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life.

Allbritton Center Unveiled at Ribbon Cutting Ceremony

Wesleyan President Michael Roth '78, WHO, WHO, Elena Allbritton ’93 and Robert Allbritton ’92 take part in a Allbritton Center ribbon-cutting ceremony Oct. 2. The U.S. Green Building Council awarded the Allbritton Center renovation its highly-prized Gold LEED Certification. (Photo by Bill Burkhart)

Wesleyan President Michael Roth '78, Joe Allbritton P'92, Barby Allbritton P'92, Elena Allbritton ’93 and Robert Allbritton ’92 take part in a Allbritton Center ribbon-cutting ceremony Oct. 2. (Photo by Bill Burkhart)

With a ribbon-cutting ceremony Oct. 2, Wesleyan unveiled a facility that enables Wesleyan to focus resources, encourage curricular innovation, original research and scholarship, and foster greater public understanding and responsibility.

The new Allbritton Broadcast Center is located on the second floor.

The new Allbritton Broadcast Center is located on the second floor.

The Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life, which occupies the renovated Davenport Campus Center, will emphasize its academic engagement with the public sphere. The center continues Wesleyan’s commitment to preparing students for lives as active citizens and for leadership. It seeks to support Wesleyan’s tradition of the scholar-teacher by encouraging faculty research in a manner that directly benefits and enhances student learning.

The Center reflects changes that have transpired across the social scientific disciplines. These include the creation of new multidisciplinary ventures, the growing number of studies employing multiple methodologies,