Tag Archive for Film Studies

Summer Film Series Features Cary Grant and His Leading Ladies

Cary Grant and Sophia Loren star in "Houseboat," which will be screened July 27 as part of the Summer Film Series at Wesleyan.

Every Tuesday night this July is a Cary Grant night at Wesleyan, though he’ll be joined by some very attractive company.

“Cary Grant and his Leading Ladies” is the title and theme of this year’s installment of Wesleyan University’s annual Wesleyan Summer Film Series.

The film "To Catch a Thief" kicks off the Film Series on July 6.

The free series held at the Goldsmith Family Cinema will feature a classic, fully-restored Cary Grant film each Tuesday night in July, with an introductory talk beginning at 7:30 p.m.

The screenings star on Tuesday, July 6, with “To Catch a Thief” featuring Grant and Grace Kelly. On Tuesday, July 13, Connecticut’s own Katherine Hepburn and a professorial Grant star in “Bringing Up Baby.” On July 20, Audry Hepburn joins Grant in “Charade.” The series wraps on Tuesday, July 27 with Sophia Loren and Grant in the always entertaining “Houseboat.”

The screenings feature fully-restored prints courtesy of the Academy Film Archive, and each film will be introduced by Marc Longenecker, programming and technical manager at Wesleyan’s Center for Film Studies. All screenings begin at 7:30 p.m. at the Goldsmith Family Cinema on 301 Washington Terrace.

The Wesleyan Summer Film Series is presented by Wesleyan University’s Center for Film Studies with support from the Connecticut Commission on Culture and Tourism, The Middlesex Chamber of Commerce, The City of Middletown and the Downtown Business District.

Östör’s Visit, Film Appreciated by Third Graders in New York

Pictured, Ákos Östör, professor of anthropology, professor of film studies, emeritus, and his wife, Lina Fruzzetti, professor of anthropology at Brown University, recently screened their documentary film, Seed and Earth (1995), to their granddaughter’s third-grade class at Parsons Memorial School in Harrison, N.Y. More than 60 students sent Östör and Fruzzetti thank you cards following their visit.

Oscar-Nominated Director Jason Reitman Speaks at Wesleyan

As part of the Film Studies Department's 2010 Independent Filmmaker Series and WesFest 2010, acclaimed director Jason Reitman showed his Oscar-nominated film "Up in the Air" to a packed audience at Goldsmith Family Cinema on April 15. After the screening Reitman talked about how he got started in the film business and answered questions about his work.

Film Studies Hosts Independent Filmmaker Series

The Wesleyan Film Studies Department and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences are hosting the 2010 Independent Filmmaker Series through April 29.

The series features a different film and guest speaker every week. The program consists of a diverse array of films and speakers which showcase the very best in contemporary independent cinema.

All shows in the series begin at 8 p.m. in the Center for Film Studies’ Goldsmith Family Cinema. They are free of charge and open to the public.

April 8: Writer/director Courtney Hunt will speak after a viewing of her film, Frozen River.

April 15: Writer/director/producer Jason Reitman will speak after a viewing of his film, Up in the Air.

April 22: Director Miguel Arteta ’89 will speak after a viewing of his film, Youth in Revolt.

April 29: Producer Sadia Shepard ’97 will speak after a viewing of the film, The September Issue.

Writer and director Sam Fleischner ’06 was the April 1 guest. He spoke about this film, Wah Do Dem, which won the Best Dramatic Feature Award at the 2009 Los Angeles Film Festival.

For more information, contact Joyce Heidorn at 860-685-2220 or David Laub at 860-685-2125.

Students Create Web Episode Series About College Life

Robby Hardesty '11 and Chris Correa '10 are actors and writers in the new FutureHouse Pictures web series, ENROLLED. Correa, creator of FutureHouse Pictures, hopes to create seven episodes by the time he graduates.

Robby Hardesty '11 and Chris Correa '10 are actors and writers in the new FutureHouse Pictures web series, Enrolled. Correa, creator of FutureHouse Pictures, hopes to create seven episodes by the time he graduates.

When college students Chris and Robby woke up outside after their 21st birthday bash, they assumed their night included dancing, girls and a fist fight. But a friend later confirms the intoxicated duo spent the entire party outside lying on top of their cars.

“What were we even doing out there, man,” Chris asks a hung-over Robby.

The characters “Chris” and “Robby,” played by Christopher Correa ’10 and Robby Hardesty ’11 are two of four main characters in the new FutureHouse Pictures Enrolled web series. To date, the FutureHouse Pictures staff has created two episodes, screened exclusively through YouTube.

Correa ’10, who started up FutureHouse Pictures this year, debuted the Enrolled pilot Nov. 12. To date, it’s had more than 2,200 views.

Caitlin Winiarski '10 plays the role of Caitlin' in Enrolled.

Caitlin Winiarski '10 plays the role of Caitlin' in Enrolled.

Enrolled is a collaborative effort; Correa, Hardesty, Josh Margolin ’11, and Caitlin Winiarski ’10 write, film and act in the show.

“When I first planned to start a production company, Josh, Robby and Caitlin were the three names that I knew needed to be on board,” Correa says. “We’ve worked together on campus at one point or another, and I think all of them bring something unique to the table.”

In the group’s initial meetings, they talked about – and watched – every television show that they could. They took mental notes and brainstormed a story line. They decided to tell stories of four friends that live together on campus.

The first episode focuses on the show’s main protagonists,

Östör’s Film Screens at National Film Festivals

The 35-minute film, Songs of a Sorrowful Man, explores the life of a painter, composer and singer living in West Bengal, India.

The 35-minute film, Songs of a Sorrowful Man, explores the life of a painter, composer and singer living in West Bengal, India.

The new film, Songs of a Sorrowful Man, directed by Ákos Östör, professor of anthropology, emeritus, and edited by film major Joe Sousa ’03, began its journey debuting at the biennial Royal Anthropological Film Festival, held at Leeds University in July.

The film was then shown at the the American Anthropological Association meeting in Philadelphia, Pa. Dec. 2-6. It also was screened recently at at Brown where it was featured as the lead event in Brown’s “Year of India” celebrations (2009-10).

The “sorrowful man,” Dukhushyam Chitrakar is a charismatic figure who encourages women to take up the traditional craft of scroll painting and musical composition pursued almost exclusively by men before.

In a series of edited sequences, the film chronicles Dukhushyam’s vision of the decline and rebirth of his art; his tolerant Sufi Muslim spirituality; his engagement with Hindus, Muslims and the modern world; his encyclopedic knowledge of changing musical and painting histories and techniques; the influence of his beliefs on his way of life, and his teachings for future generations of painters and singers in his community.

Read more about the film in an Oct. 27, 2009 Wesleyan Connection article.

Whedon ’87 to Receive Award from Producers Guild of America

Joss Whedon '87

Joss Whedon '87

Joss Whedon ’87 will be honored by the Producers Guild of America with its Vanguard Award, which recognizes achievements in new media and technology. He will receive the award at the 21st Annual PGA Awards ceremony on Jan. 24 at the Hollywood Palladium in Los Angeles. Previous Vanguard Award recipients include George Lucas, James Cameron, John Lasseter, MySpace CEO and co-founder Chris DeWolfe and president and co-founder Tom Anderson, and YouTube founders Chad Hurley, Steve Chen and Will Wright.

Whedon is a producer, writer, director, and creator for the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Angel, Firefly and Dollhouse. He was nominated for an Academy Award for Toy Story’s screenplay, and he wrote and directed the film Serenity. He also created and produced the popular Internet series Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along-Blog, for which he received an Emmy Award this year.

Whedon will be directing a forthcoming episode of the hit television series, Glee. Another upcoming project is The Cabin in the Woods, a feature he co-wrote with Drew Goddard, to be released in 2011.

Palardy ’05 Wins Filmmaking Award

Bridget Palardy '05

Bridget Palardy '05

Brooklyn, N.Y. resident Bridget Palardy ’05 has received the inaugural JT3 Artist Award of Distinction for emerging filmmakers for her short film Middletown B-Boys, a compelling dance-filled documentary that was shot in Middletown, Conn.

Palardy and four other innovative young filmmakers from Brooklyn were honored at the first-ever JT3 Artist Awards at the Brooklyn Academy of Music on Oct. 22 in a celebration with director Adam Brooks (Definitely, Maybe) and hosted by Tony-award nominated actor Brandon Victor Dixon. A nonprofit foundation created in memory of the dynamic young writer/director/producer Jesse Thompkins III, who died in a tragic traffic accident last year, JT3 Art helps cultivate budding movie makers.

JT3 Art chose Brooklyn as the focus of their 2009 grant program because of Jesse Thompkins’ passion for the neighborhood. Brooklyn was not just a place where he lived. He found frequent inspiration for his many short films on her streets.

Director Brooks, for whom Thompkins worked as an assistant on Definitely, Maybe, presented Palardy with her award for Middletown B-Boys and for her short script, Spark, a coming-of-age story set in an oppressive future. Spark is currently in post-production.

“I am incredibly humbled and honored to receive this award,” said Palardy at the award ceremony. “It means a lot to me to be able to show Middletown B-Boys to such a supportive audience and also have the opportunity to meet talented film professionals. I am thankful to the Thompkins family for starting this Foundation, and inspired by Jesse’s life and his passion for film.”

Östör, Sousa ’03 Screen Films Oct. 29

The 35-minute film, Songs of a Sorrowful Man, will be screened at 5 p.m. Oct. 29 in the Powell Family Cinema inside the Center for Film Studies.

The 35-minute film, Songs of a Sorrowful Man, will be screened at 5 p.m. Oct. 29 in the Powell Family Cinema inside the Center for Film Studies.

A film directed by Ákos Östör, professor of anthropology, emeritus, and edited by film major Joe Sousa ’03, explores the life of a painter, composer and singer living in West Bengal, India.

The 35-minute film, Songs of a Sorrowful Man, was screened Oct. 29 in the Powell Family Cinema inside the Center for Film Studies.

The “sorrowful man,” Dukhushyam Chitrakar is a charismatic figure who encourages women to take up the traditional craft of scroll painting and musical composition pursued almost exclusively by men before.

In a series of edited sequences, the film chronicles Dukhushyam’s vision of the decline and rebirth of his art; his tolerant Sufi Muslim spirituality; his engagement with Hindus, Muslims and the modern world; his encyclopedic knowledge of changing musical and painting histories and techniques; the influence of his beliefs on his way of life, and his teachings for future generations of painters and singers in his community.

Joe Sousa '03 and Matt Sienkiewicz '03 directed and produced <em>Live: from Bethlehem</em>.

Joe Sousa '03 and Matt Sienkiewicz '03 directed and produced Live: from Bethlehem.

Another film, directed and produced by Sousa and Matt Sienkiewicz ’03 producer/director was shown after Songs of a Sorrowful Man. Live: from Bethlehem, is a feature documentary and online video source that tells the story of how journalists from the Ma’an Network have declared independence from hate-filled propaganda and are revolutionizing media in the Palestinian Territories.

The film chronicles the struggles, failures and triumphs of the network, the only major independent news source in the Palestinian Territories. Following the lives of the station’s reporters, producers and photographers, the documentary provides an in-depth, balanced look into the challenges of making news in one of the world’s most combative regions.

Östör and Sousa discussed their films following the screenings.

Draper ’12 Interns at Cannes Film Festival

Nathaniel Draper '12 and his friend Matt Firpo (NYU '12) stand in front of Festival de Cannes emblem in the Grand Lumiere Theater. Draper was an intern at the Festival de Cannes.

Nathaniel Draper '12 and his friend Matt Firpo (NYU '12) stand in front of Festival de Cannes emblem in the Grand Lumiere Theater. Draper was an intern at the Cannes Film Festival in southern France.

For 15 days, Nathaniel Draper ’12 mingled with top filmmakers at the Cannes Film Festival while participating in educational workshops, seminars, pitch sessions, roundtable discussions and screenings. He also happened to pick up an award for a film of his own while he was there.

As a student intern at the 62nd annual Cannes Film Festival, held May 13-24 in southern France, Draper had a hands-on opportunity to explore the film industry through the prism of perhaps it most prestigious international event.

“It was, to put it lightly, a surreal experience,” Draper recalls. “I was able to meet iconic directors such as Martin Scorcese and Francis Ford Coppola, and found myself interacting with actors and directors such as Inglorious Basterds’ Eli Roth.”

Draper applied for the internship though the American Pavilion Student Filmmaker Program at Cannes, which is the festival’s center for American film and filmmakers.

Draper spent a week with avant garde filmmaker Jonas Mekas in Paris.

Draper spent a week with avant garde filmmaker Jonas Mekas in Paris.

The internship program included a three-day pre-Festival orientation and tour of Cannes, including workshops and seminars on the business of filmmaking; nightly festival premiers; roundtable discussions with industry professionals; and an opportunity to network with industry insiders and observe the business of filmmaking firsthand.

“I was granted full festival accreditation–basically a carte blanche to go anywhere in the festival, which allowed me to interact with filmmakers, explore the Cannes film market, and essentially network with the incredibly array of industry professionals that were there,” Draper says. “I took part in panel discussions ranging from screenwriters to the screen actors guild to premier directors.”

Elia Kazan Centennial Celebrated with Film, Gallery Exhibit

Wesleyan is celebrating the life of Elia Kazan throughout the fall semester. (Photo courtesy of eliakazan.net)

Wesleyan is celebrating the life of Elia Kazan throughout the fall semester. (Photo courtesy of eliakazan.net)

If you want to study the life and work of Elia Kazan, “you come to Wesleyan.”

That’s what Jeanine Basinger, chair and the Corwin-Fuller Professor of Film Studies, curator of the Cinema Archives, suggests to students or film fanatics in the community. For more than two decades, screenwriter/director Kazan (1909-2003) had ties with Wesleyan, and donated photographs, scripts, personal letters, and other life documents to the university.

To celebrate and honor Kazan on what would be his 100th birthday, the Film Studies Department is hosting the Elia Kazan Centennial. The semester-long retrospective includes 11 Kazan film screenings with introductions, a gallery exhibit, a course titled “Celebrating Elia Kazan” and additional related events and speakers.

All showings begin at 8 p.m. every Thursday through Dec. 3. at the Center for Film Studies. The exhibit will be open from 7 to 8 p.m. in the adjacent Rick Nicita Gallery prior to the screenings. The exhibit materials from the Wesleyan Cinema Archives’ Elia Kazan Collection.

“It’s appropriate as his official archive, that Wesleyan honor his Centennial,” says Basinger, who had a personal tie to Kazan. “Mr. Kazan and I had a mutual interest in film and theater and became good friends. He loved my students

Miller ’99: A Top 20 Canadian Film Maker

Garfield Lindsay Miller '99 is the writer/producer of <em>The Last New Year</em>, which debuted at the Victoria Film Fest as the Canadian Gala Film. (Photo by Kerry Haynes/North Shore Outlook)

Garfield Lindsay Miller '99 is the writer/producer of The Last New Year, which debuted at the Victoria Film Fest as the Canadian Gala Film. (Photo by Kerry Haynes/North Shore Outlook)

Garfield Lindsay Miller ’99 is featured in a July 29 article titled “Dramatic Choices,” published by the BC Local News North Shore Outlook section.

Miller’s filmmaking resume includes co-writing and producing the award-winning and Gemini-nominated documentary The Fires that Burn about Sister Elaine MacInnes and co-writing Stone’s Throw, an award-winning dramatic feature film set in Nova Scotia – among many other film credits. Most recently, Miller, who is back living in British Columbia, was voted one of the top 20 Top Canadian Film Makers by a jury of his peers.

Miller’s new feature film, The Last New Year, which recently debuted at the Victoria Film Fest as the Canadian Gala Film, has already garnered rave reviews. The film explores the relationships between a group of friends who made a pact in high school to get together each New Year’s Eve.

The online article mentions how Miller transferred to Wesleyan to study English and play baseball. He signed up for the History of World Cinema and worked as a TA in Wesleyan’s Film Studies Department.

“I realized film had the potential to be an art form – I’d never realized that before, I always just though of it as entertainment,” he says in the article. “It was there that I (really) discovered film. I took more film (classes) than English (classes).”

After graduation, he returned to B.C. and got a job on a local tech TV show and wrote a screenplay, according to the article.