Tag Archive for Davison Art Center

WW I Posters Shine at Davison Art Center Exhibit

dac_pr_2014-08_action_bakerdac_pr_2014-08_action_christyIt was called “the war to end all wars.” Causing the downfall of three major empires, and eclipsing all previous wars in its destruction, World War I changed the course of global history. And decades before television and sophisticated print advertising, it changed the way conflict was marketed to the American people.

A new exhibit, Call to Action: American Posters in World War I, at the Davison Art Center, displays dramatic posters that recruited soldiers, celebrated shipbuilding, called women for war work and even urged homemakers to prepare alternative foods in support of the war effort.

“The best illustrators of the day were recruited to donate their time to make these posters,” said Clare Rogan, curator of the DAC. “Artists recognized this was how they could serve. And this was the high point in American illustration, you have fabulous artists working as illustrators, and monthly periodicals are all illustrated before photography takes over in these areas.”

Two Whistler Drawings from DAC to Be Featured in PBS Documentary

Open Access Image from the Davison Art Center, Wesleyan University

Whistler’s sketch showing how his Venice works should be exhibited in 1880

Two drawings by James McNeill Whistler, part of the Davison Art Center’s collection of more than 100 Whistler works, will be shown in a new documentary on the life of the painter.

The sketches, one in pencil and one in pen and ink, will be seen in “James McNeill Whistler & The Case for Beauty,” premiering September 12 on PBS.

They represent just a small part of Wesleyan’s extensive holdings of works on paper by Whistler, one of the most important American artists of the 19th century.

“Whistler was crucial in making the connection between the Impressionists and British art, and … American art,” said Clare Rogan, curator of the Davison Art Center and adjunct assistant professor of art history. “While he worked mostly in Europe, he was incredibly important in creating that link.”

Neither sketch is large – unlike finished prints or paintings, both were for Whistler’s personal use and not intended to be seen by a larger audience. They are, however, interesting glimpses of an artist at work. The pencil sketch, measuring at just 4.4 by 6.9 inches, represents his ideas about displaying his famous landscape prints of Venice at an 1880 exhibit by the Fine Arts Society in London.

Friends of the DAC Hosts “The Big Draw” for Local Community

On April 6, the Friends of the Davison Art Center sponsored "The Big Draw: Middletown," a community celebration of drawing with workshops designed for all skill levels, from beginning drawers to accomplished artists. The Big Draw will included eight drawing workshops held throughout Wesleyan campus, facilitated by Wesleyan art faculty, art students and the Middletown High School Art Club.

On April 6, the Friends of the Davison Art Center sponsored “The Big Draw: Middletown,” a community celebration of drawing with workshops designed for all skill levels, from beginning drawers to accomplished artists. The Big Draw included eight drawing workshops held throughout the Wesleyan campus, facilitated by Wesleyan art faculty, art students and the Middletown High School Art Club.

“Planes, Trains and Automobiles” at the Davison Art Center through March 6

"Planes, Trains and Automobiles," opened Jan. 30 at the Davison Art Center. The photo-rich exhibit captures the essence and excitement of speed and machinery via images of some of the more romantic modes of transportation from the past 150 years.

“Planes, Trains and Automobiles,” opened Jan. 30 at the Davison Art Center. The photo-rich exhibit captures the essence and excitement of speed and machinery via images of some of the more romantic modes of transportation from the past 150 years. (Photos by Olivia Drake)

Four gelatin silver prints by Berenice Abbott (American, 1898-1991) are in the exhibit, including "Gasoline Station, East Tremont Avenue and Dock Street, 1936. A young expatriate in Paris in the 1920s, Abbott was a studio assistant to Man Ray before establishing herself as a portrait photographer. In 1929 she returned to the United States and, inspired by Eugene Atget’s photographs of Paris, she started on her “immense subject,” documenting New York City. Funding the project remained difficult until 1935, when she was hired by the Works Progress Administration.

Four gelatin silver prints by Berenice Abbott (American, 1898-1991) are in the exhibit, including “Gasoline Station, East Tremont Avenue and Dock Street, 1936.” A young expatriate in Paris in the 1920s, Abbott was a studio assistant to Man Ray before establishing herself as a portrait photographer. In 1929 she returned to the United States and, inspired by Eugene Atget’s photographs of Paris, she started on her “immense subject,” documenting New York City. Funding the project remained difficult until 1935, when she was hired by the Works Progress Administration.

Friends of the Davison Art Center Hosts Online, Onsite Auctions

The Friends of the Davison Art Center is hosting an online auction Oct. 15-Nov. 9. An onsite auction will be held on Nov. 2.

The Friends of the Davison Art Center is hosting an online auction Oct. 15-Nov. 9. An onsite auction will be held on Nov. 2.

The Friends of the Davison Art Center is hosting its first-ever online auction featuring many pieces of fine art including works by internationally-exhibiting photographers, Wesleyan faculty, alumni and friends. The online auction, supported  by Bidding for Good, runs for three weeks, from Oct. 15 through Nov. 9 and will be accessed at http://fdac.wesleyan.edu.

As part of Wesleyan’s Homecoming/Family Weekend the Friends will also host a silent auction and free champagne reception at the Alsop House from 3 to 6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2.

“We welcome the public to come get an up-close look at the pieces in the online auction and bid on additional items such as theater tickets, signed books, private tours, one-on-one classes and handicrafts,” said Mariah Reisner ’04, MA ’07, president of the Friends of the Davison Art Center.  “The auction is filled with beautiful, interesting and unique items and your purchase will help Wesleyan acquire new and important works for our collection.”

The online auction will feature fine artists including works by photographers Marion Belanger, Jen Davis, Dru Donovan, Joel Wellington Fischer, Curran Hatleberg, and John Lehr as well as Wesleyan faculty Julia Randall, Sasha Rudensky, David Schorr, Keiji Shinohara, Wesleyan alumni including Eli Durst, Lindsay Keys, Daria Lombroso, Juliana Romano, friends Matthew Grubb, Will McCarthy, Peter Waite and more.

The silent auction will include a preview of the works in the online auction as well as additional works by artists including Lee Berman, Connie Brown, Roslyn Carrier-Brault, Michael Danchak, Jackie Etling, Stan Klaneski and Kathy de Mayo. It also will include items such as a family photography session, a one-on-one Alexander Technique lesson, a private yoga class, an original composition, signed books, private tours, Center for the Arts theater tickets, tickets to Long Wharf Theater, gift certificates, handcrafts and more.

Founded in 1962, the Friends of the Davison Art Center includes more than 300 members and is dedicated to supporting the Davison Art Center collection. The Davison Art Center holds approximately 18,000 prints and 6,000 photographs in one of the foremost collections of prints and photographs at an American college or university.

Ligon ’82 Donates Etchings to DAC in Honor of Professor of Art Schorr

In August, artist Glenn Ligon '82, who received an honorary degree from Wesleyan in 2012, donated a series of nine etchings titled "Narratives," 1993, to the Davison Art Center. The prints respond to and rework the conventions of 19th century narratives by slaves and freed men and women. Ligon donated the prints in honor of David Schorr, professor of art. The etchings are now part of the DAC's permanent collection and are available for viewing by appointment.

In August, artist Glenn Ligon ’82, who received an honorary degree from Wesleyan in 2012, donated a series of nine etchings titled “Narratives” from 1993 to the Davison Art Center. The prints respond to and rework the conventions of 19th century narratives by slaves and freed men and women. Ligon donated the prints in honor of David Schorr, professor of art. The etchings are now part of the DAC’s permanent collection and are available for viewing by appointment.

David Schorr and Glenn Ligon.

David Schorr and Glenn Ligon at the 2012 Commencement ceremony.

“(Re)viewing Bodies” Photograph Exhibit on Display in Davison Art Center

The Davison Art Center's exhibit, "(Re)viewing Bodies: Selected American Photographs, 1930-2000," opened on Feb. 7 in the DAC gallery. The show is curated by students who took the course ARHA 360, Museum Studies, taught in fall 2012 by Clare Rogan, curator of the Davison Art Center. Hyunjin Chelsey Cho ’13, pictured, is one of the student curators who helped opening attendees navigate the gallery.

The Davison Art Center’s exhibit, “(Re)viewing Bodies: Selected American Photographs, 1930-2000,” opened on Feb. 7 in the DAC gallery. The show is curated by students who took the course ARHA 360, Museum Studies, taught in fall 2012 by Clare Rogan, curator of the Davison Art Center. Hyunjin Chelsey Cho ’13, pictured, is one of the student curators who helped opening attendees navigate the gallery.

Alexa Burzinski ’15 spoke about organizing the "(Re)viewing Bodies" exhibit. Topics of the show include the abstracted or fragmented body, the body and labor, the body and performance, the body in social situations, and the body in pain. Photographers include Diane Arbus, Larry Burrows, Kevin Bubriski, Harry Callahan, Judy Dater, Gordon Parks, and Jerry Uelsmann.

Alexa Burzinski ’15 spoke about organizing the “(Re)viewing Bodies” exhibit. Topics of the show include the abstracted or fragmented body, the body and labor, the body and performance, the body in social situations and the body in pain. Photographers include Diane Arbus, Larry Burrows, Kevin Bubriski, Harry Callahan, Judy Dater, Gordon Parks and Jerry Uelsmann.

The exhibition examines the ways 20th-century American photographers have represented the body, whether as subject or compositional element. Pictured, Virgil Taylor ’15 discussed his knowledge from his Museum Studies course. Other student curators included  Alexa Chiapetta ’13, Oliver Citrin ’14, Aria Danaparamita ’13, Philip Dinolfo ’14, Rachel Pei Hirsch ’15, Sewon Kang ’14, Sydney Lowe ’13, Matias Seijas ’13, Ariana Todd ’13 and Tessa Young ’13. (Photos by Hannah Norman '16)

The exhibition examines the ways 20th-century American photographers have represented the body, whether as subject or compositional element. Pictured, Virgil Taylor ’15 discussed his knowledge from his Museum Studies course. Other student curators included Alexa Chiapetta ’13, Oliver Citrin ’14, Aria Danaparamita ’13, Philip Dinolfo ’14, Rachel Pei Hirsch ’15, Sewon Kang ’14, Sydney Lowe ’13, Matias Seijas ’13, Ariana Todd ’13 and Tessa Young ’13. (Photos by Hannah Norman ’16)

The Davison Art Center gallery, located at 301 High Street, is open noon to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. The gallery is open to the public free of charge.

Davison Art Center Hosts “The Big Draw” April 22

In celebration of its 50th anniversary, the Friends of the Davison Art Center present “The Big Draw: Middletown,” a community celebration of drawing with workshops for people of all skill levels, from beginners to accomplished artists. The event is free and open to the public: adults, students, and children ages 5 and up. The Big Draw’s activities break down the “I can’t draw” syndrome and celebrate the visual arts.

The event takes place from 1 to 5 p.m., Sunday April 22 on campus.

“The Big Draw: Middletown” will feature 10 to 12 drawing workshops throughout the Wesleyan University campus. Wesleyan art faculty and art students, Middletown public school art teachers, and members of the Middletown High School Art Club will facilitate the workshops. The wide range of activities will include illustration, Japanese sumi-e ink drawing, a collective Earth Day-themed drawing, movement and drawing, and a scavenger hunt.

Participants will draw from live models, period costumes, the natural world, dancers, art in the Davison Art Center gallery, and the imagination. Drawing study of nude models is open to adults and minors with parental permission. The day will culminate with a community exhibition on campus. The event will take place rain or shine.

“The Big Draw: Middletown” is sponsored in part by the Friends of the Davison Art Center; the Wesleyan University Division of Arts and Humanities, Department of Art and Art History, Center for the Arts, and Center for Community Partnerships; the Middlesex County Community Foundation/Mary Ann Lambert Fund; and the Middletown Commission on the Arts.

For the latest information about “The Big Draw: Middletown,” see event updates on Facebook  and on the Friends of the Davison Art Center blog.

MCA, MCCF Supports Davison Art Center’s Upcoming “Big Draw”

The Davison Art Center received a $1,000 grant from the Middletown Commission on the Arts and a $500 grant from the Middlesex County Community Foundation/Mary Ann Lambert Fund to support “The Big Draw: Middletown.”

“The Big Draw: Middletown” is a community event with drawing activities on Sunday, April 22. It is modeled on the successful British program that promotes interactive activities designed to break down the “I can’t draw” syndrome and promote the visual arts.

Organized by the Friends of the Davison Art Center to celebrate their 50th anniversary, the event will be located on Wesleyan’s campus, including the Davison Art Center, Center for the Arts and Beckham Hall. It will be free and open to the public. The target audience is all members of the community: students, amateur artists, aspiring artists, and those who never considered the possibility of attempting to create art. There will be 12-14 different activities including mapping, automatic drawing, mural making, life study, and movement and line.

For more information e-mail Clare Rogan, curator of the Davison Art Center, at crogan@wesleyan.edu.

“Artful Lunch” Offers Lecture, Gathering

Elizabeth Milroy, professor of art history, professor of American studies, professor of environmental studies, speaks about a lithograph created by Helen Frankenthaler. The piece is part of the Davison Art Center's collection and was the topic of an "Artful Lunch" Sept. 28.

For 15 minutes, Elizabeth Milroy, professor of art history, describes the life, artistic techniques and style of abstract expressionist painter and printmaker Helen Frankenthaler.

“Here, we see her thinking about framing and edging,” Milroy says, pointing at a lithograph in the Davison Art Center. “She emulates Chinese characters in this print. She bring out lusciousness in lithography.”

Friends of the Davison Art Center member Jean Shaw HON '11 enjoys the "Artful Lunch." Shaw is a former director of the Center for the Arts.

As part of the new series, “Artful Lunch,” faculty briefly speak about an artist, and display one example of the artist’s work from the Davison Art Center’s collection. The series is sponsored and hosted by the Friends of the Davison Art Center as part of the FDAC’s 50th Anniversary. Talks are open to FDAC members, Wesleyan students, staff and faculty.

Milroy presented Frankenthaler’s print titled A Slice of the Stone Itself on Sept. 28. The image was printed from two stones on French handmade paper at Universal Limited Art Editions in West Islip, N.Y. in 1969. The Davison Art Center purchased the print in 1980 with funds from the National Endowment for the Arts, and matching funds from the Friends of the Davison Art Center.

Milroy explained how Frankenthaler became known in the 1950s with her “stained” paintings on unprimed canvas. She later moved to lithography and ultimately woodcuts. Milroy visited Frankenthaler’s studio

Wesleyan Presents Prints of Julie Mehretu, Masculinity in Sports Exhibit

Julie Mehretu's lithograph and screenprint, "Entropia (review)," from 2004, will be on exhibit in the Davison Art Center Sept. 16-Dec. 11. The exhibit is free and open to the public.

Wesleyan will present two traveling exhibits this fall.

The Davison Art Center gallery will host Excavations: The Prints of Julie Mehretu, Sept. 16-Dec. 11. Mehretu is best known for her large-scale paintings and drawings, which layer maps, urban planning grids and architectural renderings with whorls of abstract markings and bright shapes of color. This the first-ever comprehensive exhibition of prints produced by the artist thus far in her career.

A gallery talk is scheduled for 5:30 p.m. Oct. 5 with Cole Rogers, artistic director and Master Printer at the Highpoint Center for Printmaking. Rogers will speak on his experience working with the artist, and the complex technical and aesthetic interweaving of her prints.

Accompanying the show is a beautiful, 44-page color catalog with plates of the prints and an essay by Siri Engberg, curator at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, Minn. In her catalog essay, Engberg traces this visual vocabulary back to Mehretu’s graduate studies at the Rhode Island School of Design, where she first worked with intaglio printmaking and the necessity of breaking imagery down into its component layers.