Tag Archive for exhibit

Telfair’s New Landscape Paintings on Exhibit in Zilkha Gallery

Tula Telfair, professor of art, will debut her newest collection of large-scale oil paintings at the Zilkha Gallery Sept. 16.

Tula Telfair, professor of art, will debut her newest collection of large-scale oil paintings at the Zilkha Gallery Sept. 16. Pictured is her painting titled “The Structured Depth of Meaning and Desire,” 2014, 72 x 100 inches.

“A World of Dreams—New Landscape Paintings” by Professor of Art Tula Telfair will be on exhibit Sept. 16 through Dec. 7 at the Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery. The exhibit’s opening reception will be held 5 to 6:30 p.m. Sept. 16 at the gallery.

“Civilization Could Not Do Without It,” 2014, 75 x 100 inches.

A World of Dreams” includes new large-scale paintings in which Telfair presents monumental landscapes and epic-scale vistas that are simultaneously awe-inspiring and intimate. She combines stillness with motion, solitude with universality, and definition with suggestion in her bold and quiet works. This is her second exhibition in the Zilkha Gallery.

All paintings are oil on canvas.

“The work for this show is entirely different. The subjects are different, the techniques are different in each painting, and from piece to piece,” she explained. “There is a lot of diversity of images in this exhibition that reflect a broad range of environments from the Antarctic to the jungles of Africa to rolling fields and soaring mountains. There are a full range of landscapes.”

Telfair’s contemporary paintings demonstrate the spirit and potency

Monument Quilt Offers Public Platform for Rape Victims to Grieve, Heal

DSC_2560The Wesleyan community gathered on Foss Hill Sept. 2 to view The Monument Quilt, a crowd-sourced collection of thousands of stories from survivors of rape and abuse. The quilt serves as a platform for storytelling and a space where survivors are publicly supported.

Sections of the quilt are traveling throughout the United States. In August, the quilt made stops in North Carolina, Alabama, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Iowa, South Dakota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Pennsylvania, New York and Maryland.

Following the tour, thousands of fabric squares will be stitched together to spell “NOT ALONE” on the National Mall.Through public recognition, the quilt aims to reconnect survivors to their community.

U.S. Senators Richard Blumenthal and Chris Murphy (D-CT) also attended.

Learn more at https://themonumentquilt.org/.

(Photos by Cynthia Rockwell and Olivia Drake)

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Shinohara’s Monotypes to be Exhibited at Plantsville Gallery

Supp. Image_Opus-12_monotype_12x11_2008The work of Keiji Shinohara, artist-in-residence of art, artist-in-residence of East Asian studies, will be exhibited at a gallery in Plantsville, Conn., Oct. 4-31.

The exhibition at Paris in Plantsville Gallery, titled, “Whispers of the Infinite: The Art of Keiji Shinohara,” represents the first time that Shinohara’s monotypes will have been exhibited in the United States. An opening reception will be held Oct. 4 from 6-9 p.m.

Born and raised in Osaka, Japan, Shinohara trained for 10 years as an apprentice under the renowned artist Keiichiro Uesugi, and became a Master Printmaker. Shinohara then moved to the U.S., and has been teaching at Wesleyan since 1995. He has been a visiting artist at more than 10 venues, and had 40 solo shows, both in the U.S. and Japan.

His nature-based abstractions are printed on handmade kozo paper using water-based pigment onto woodblocks in the ukiyo-e style, the traditional Japanese printmaking method dating to 600 CE. Though Shinohara employs ancient methods in creating his woodblock prints, he also diverges from tradition by experimenting with ink application and different materials to add texture to his prints. He personally executes all the steps involved in the printmaking process, from carving the woodblock to printing by hand. Elegantly understated, these works are a fusion of Japanese aesthetic and Western modernism.

See more images from the exhibition below.

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Display in Usdan Illustrates Students’ Geographic Diversity

A map in Usdan University Center created out of recycled paper, yarn and pins by student Orientation interns illustrates the geographic diversity of Wesleyan's newest students. The new students—including the Class of 2018, transfer and graduate students—come from as as close as Middletown and as far away as North Sydney, Australia (20,002 miles).

A map in Usdan University Center created out of recycled paper, yarn and pins by student Orientation interns illustrates the geographic diversity of Wesleyan’s newest students. The new students—including the Class of 2018, transfer and graduate students—come from as as close as Middletown and as far away as North Sydney, Australia (20,002 miles).

13 Movie Posters on Display in New Cinema Archives Exhibit

Wesleyan's Cinema Archives is hosting the exhibit "Posters from the Collection" in the Rick Nicita Gallery through April 30. The posters represent 13 prominent collections from the Wesleyan Cinema Archives. Posters have been donated to the Archives by filmmakers, producers and others, and the Archives now boasts more than 1,500 rare film posters in its collection.

Wesleyan’s Cinema Archives is hosting the exhibit “Posters from the Collection” in the Rick Nicita Gallery through April 30. The posters represent 13 prominent collections from the Wesleyan Cinema Archives. Posters have been donated to the Archives by filmmakers, producers and others, and the Archives now boasts more than 1,500 rare film posters in its collection.

Media, Art, Graffiti, Technology Intersect in New Zilkha Gallery Exhibit

Artist Evan Roth's work occupies the irregular zone at the intersection of free culture with popular culture, where viral media meets art, and graffiti connects with technology. From Feb. 5-March 2, Roth's "Intellectual Property Donor," is on display in the Center for the Art's Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery. Ginger Gregg Duggan and Judith Hoos Fox of c², curatorsquared, co-curated the exhibit.

Artist Evan Roth’s work occupies the irregular zone at the intersection of free culture with popular culture, where viral media meets art, and graffiti connects with technology. From Feb. 5-March 2, Roth’s “Intellectual Property Donor,” is on display in the Center for the Art’s Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery. Ginger Gregg Duggan and Judith Hoos Fox of c², curatorsquared, co-curated the exhibit.

The images, objects and experiences in the exhibition Intellectual Property Donor suggest a new way to exist within the current environment shaped by our participation in an increasingly cyber and global world, yet grounded in our need for materiality and personal connections. Pictured is Compilation, 2014, a single channel video.

The images, objects and experiences in the exhibition Intellectual Property Donor suggest a new way to exist within the current environment shaped by our participation in an increasingly cyber and global world, yet grounded in our need for materiality and personal connections. Pictured is Compilation, 2014, a single channel video.

Freeman Gallery Features Exhibit on Human, Geographic Form

In the multi dimensional installation "Silent Faces/Angkor," artist Mary Heebner knits together imagery and writing to create an elemental, spiritual, and involving interpretation of the myths of the ancient Angkor temple complex that plays on the links she has found between human and geographic forms. The exhibit is on display at the Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies Gallery through May 25.

In the multi dimensional installation “Silent Faces/Angkor,” artist Mary Heebner knits together imagery and writing to create an elemental, spiritual, and involving interpretation of the myths of the ancient Angkor temple complex that plays on the links she has found between human and geographic forms. The exhibit is on display at the Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies Gallery through May 25.

“(Re)viewing Bodies” Photograph Exhibit on Display in Davison Art Center

The Davison Art Center's exhibit, "(Re)viewing Bodies: Selected American Photographs, 1930-2000," opened on Feb. 7 in the DAC gallery. The show is curated by students who took the course ARHA 360, Museum Studies, taught in fall 2012 by Clare Rogan, curator of the Davison Art Center. Hyunjin Chelsey Cho ’13, pictured, is one of the student curators who helped opening attendees navigate the gallery.

The Davison Art Center’s exhibit, “(Re)viewing Bodies: Selected American Photographs, 1930-2000,” opened on Feb. 7 in the DAC gallery. The show is curated by students who took the course ARHA 360, Museum Studies, taught in fall 2012 by Clare Rogan, curator of the Davison Art Center. Hyunjin Chelsey Cho ’13, pictured, is one of the student curators who helped opening attendees navigate the gallery.

Alexa Burzinski ’15 spoke about organizing the "(Re)viewing Bodies" exhibit. Topics of the show include the abstracted or fragmented body, the body and labor, the body and performance, the body in social situations, and the body in pain. Photographers include Diane Arbus, Larry Burrows, Kevin Bubriski, Harry Callahan, Judy Dater, Gordon Parks, and Jerry Uelsmann.

Alexa Burzinski ’15 spoke about organizing the “(Re)viewing Bodies” exhibit. Topics of the show include the abstracted or fragmented body, the body and labor, the body and performance, the body in social situations and the body in pain. Photographers include Diane Arbus, Larry Burrows, Kevin Bubriski, Harry Callahan, Judy Dater, Gordon Parks and Jerry Uelsmann.

The exhibition examines the ways 20th-century American photographers have represented the body, whether as subject or compositional element. Pictured, Virgil Taylor ’15 discussed his knowledge from his Museum Studies course. Other student curators included  Alexa Chiapetta ’13, Oliver Citrin ’14, Aria Danaparamita ’13, Philip Dinolfo ’14, Rachel Pei Hirsch ’15, Sewon Kang ’14, Sydney Lowe ’13, Matias Seijas ’13, Ariana Todd ’13 and Tessa Young ’13. (Photos by Hannah Norman '16)

The exhibition examines the ways 20th-century American photographers have represented the body, whether as subject or compositional element. Pictured, Virgil Taylor ’15 discussed his knowledge from his Museum Studies course. Other student curators included Alexa Chiapetta ’13, Oliver Citrin ’14, Aria Danaparamita ’13, Philip Dinolfo ’14, Rachel Pei Hirsch ’15, Sewon Kang ’14, Sydney Lowe ’13, Matias Seijas ’13, Ariana Todd ’13 and Tessa Young ’13. (Photos by Hannah Norman ’16)

The Davison Art Center gallery, located at 301 High Street, is open noon to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. The gallery is open to the public free of charge.

Works by 14 Artists in CFA’s “Passing Time” Exhibit

A patron reads about "Passing Time," a new exhibition of recent works by 14 international artists in a range of media which explores the multiple and converging meanings of the phrase "passing time," during the opening reception in the Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery on Jan. 31. "Passing Time," curated by Ginger Gregg Duggan and Judith Hoos Fox of c2 curatorsquared, is on display through March 4.

Wesleyan students enjoy the work "Lunar Alphabet" (1979) by artist Leandro Katz. The 27 photographs of the phases of the moon have been aligned with the alphabet, enabling Katz to "write" using this language based on the passage of time, creating a visual poetry based on this lunar tempo.

Alvin Lucier’s Career Celebrated through Installation, Performance

For 40 years, Alvin Lucier, the John Spencer Camp Professor of Music, emeritus, has pioneered music composition and performance, including the notation of performers’ physical gestures, the use of brain waves in live performance, the generation of visual imagery by sound in vibrating media, and the evocation of room acoustics for musical purposes.

On Nov. 4-6, the Music Department and Center for the Arts celebrated Lucier’s remarkable musical career and contributions. Lucier retired in June 2010. Photos of the event are below. (Information provided by Andy Chatfield, press and marketing manager for the CFA)

Patrons explore the exhibit "Alvin Lucier (and His Artist Friends)" during the opening reception in the Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery on Nov. 5. The exhibit, curated by Andrea Miller-Keller, includes audio recordings, video, scores and album/CD artwork of musical compositions; selected works by other artists that have inspired or been inspired by Lucier's work, or exchanged ideas with the composer in meaningful ways; and memorabilia and ephemera of historical interest in the life and career of Alvin Lucier, the John Spencer Camp Professor of Music, emeritus. The exhibit is on display through Dec. 11.

Sichuan Earthquake Photographs Featured in FEAS Gallery Exhibit

Curator Patrick Dowdey speaks about the exhibit “The Great Sichuan Earthquake” March 30 in the Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies Gallery. On May 12, 2008, a 7.9-magnitude earthquake in Sichuan, China toppled buildings, destroyed roads and left over 80,000 dead. The government responded immediately with a massive rescue effort, and thousands of volunteers from all over China visited the quake zone to help. This is the first U.S. exhibition of these photographs by Chinese photographers, who themselves participated in the relief work.