Tag Archive for THISISWHY

Wesleyan Baseball Heads to Nashua, N.H. to Defend NESCAC Title

The 2015 Wesleyan baseball team at Amherst after winning the Little Three Championship in April. (Photo by Rick Dennett '77, P '15.)

The 2015 Wesleyan baseball team at Amherst after winning the Little Three Championship in April. (Photo by Rick Dennett ’77, P ’15)

#THISISWHY

The 2015 Wesleyan baseball season was highly anticipated, fraught with hopes of picking up where the accomplished 2014 squad left off. The entire starting lineup of 2015 was back from the 2014 team, which had gone 31-13, winning the first-ever NESCAC Championship in program history and going deep into the NCAA Division III regional with a 4-2 mark. Though three pitchers from the 2014 squad graduated that year, the Cardinals had three tremendous returners on the mound and a fourth pitcher with enormous promise. The result? A program record for regular-season wins (25), a third straight Little Three title and another trip to the NESCAC tournament, the third in a row for the Cardinals and fifth excursion in the last seven seasons.

Scholar-Athletes Honored at Banquet

At the banquet, Pat Tynan, head women's crew coach, and Athletic Director Mike Whalen '83 presented an award to Brianne Wiemann '15.

At the banquet, Pat Tynan, head women’s crew coach, and Athletic Director Mike Whalen ’83 presented an award to Brianne Wiemann ’15.

#THISISWHY

On April 30, more than 150 scholar-athletes, along with their coaches, faculty and staff members, attended the third annual scholar-athlete banquet, held in Beckham Hall.

Among the evening’s highlights was the presentation of the Roger Maynard Memorial Awards to women’s crew coxswain Brianne Wiemann ’15 and baseball second baseman Andrew Yin ’15. Since 1970, the award has been presented to the male and female senior student-athletes who best exemplify the spirit, humility and accomplishments of Roger Maynard ’37, a former Wesleyan trustee and standout cross-country and track letterman.

As the varsity-eight cox the last two seasons, Wiemann was integral in helping the Cardinals reach the NCAA Division III Championships a year ago. During that competition, she was named the Elite 89 winner for Division III women’s rowing as the participant in the Championships with the highest overall GPA. Wesleyan’s 2015 varsity eight squad is ranked ninth nationally in Division III heading into the New England Championships on May 2.

Yin took over as the Cardinals’ starting second baseman during his freshman year and enjoyed a string of 118 consecutive starts for the team over a four-year span. Heading into the final weekend of the 2015 regular season, Yin has 183 career hits, ranking third all-time at Wesleyan. He was a first-team CoSIDA/Capital One Academic All-American in 2014 after earning third-team honors as a sophomore. That year he also received first-team all-NESCAC and second-team all-ECAC New England Division III laurels.

Head baseball coach Mark Woodworth with Andrew Yin '15.

Head baseball coach Mark Woodworth with Andrew Yin ’15.

Wesleyan supporter and team orthopedic surgeon Dr. Bruck Moeckel, who has serviced the Cardinal athletic community for 23 years, was also honored at the banquet with the Cardinal Award. Presented by Wesleyan’s Athletic Advisory Council (AAC), the award recognizes a member of the Wesleyan community who has provided tremendous service and support to athletics.

During the banquet, Yin and women’s swimming standout Angela Slevin ’15 also spoke about their time as Wesleyan student-athletes. Slevin holds or is part of 11 Wesleyan school records, and was an NCAA Division III Swimming & Diving Championships qualifier as a junior. She has been all-NESCAC throughout her career.

Attendees at the event were selected from 310 student-athletes who met the minimum qualification of a 3.2 cumulative GPA with at least sophomore status academically. That group was then whittled down to the 168 who received an invitation to the dinner based on a combination of their athletic accomplishment and the strength of their academic achievement.

McIntyre ’17 Brings “Before I Die” Public Art Project to Wes

Laura McIntyre '17 brought the "Before I Die" public art project to Wesleyan the week of April 20. Members of the Wesleyan community were asked to fill in their fears, ambitions and thoughts on a blackboard cube installed outside Usdan University Center.

Laura McIntyre ’17 brought the “Before I Die” public art project to Wesleyan the week of April 20. Members of the Wesleyan community were asked to fill in their fears, ambitions and thoughts on a blackboard cube installed outside Usdan University Center.

#THISISWHY

In this issue of News @ Wes, we speak to Laura McIntyre from the Class of 2017.

Q: Laura, please tell us where you’re from and what you’re majoring in.

A: I’m a sophomore here at Wes. I’m majoring in sociology and am thinking about the film minor. I’m from New York City.

Q: I understand the “Before I Die” public art project has been installed in locations all over the world. When and how did this project come to be?

A: The project was started by an artist named Candy Chang as a personal project after someone close to her died. She used the side of an abandoned building in her neighborhood in New Orleans, and covered it with the statement that’s now been used on all the walls following: “Before I die I want to _______.” To her surprise, people really jumped on the idea and started writing on it. That original wall was made in 2011 and, since then, there have been over 550 renditions.

Q: How did you first learn about the project? Why did you decide to bring it to Wesleyan?

Students Receive Davis Projects for Peace Grant

Claudia Kahindi '18, left, and Olayinka Lawal '15 will use a Davis Projects for Peace grant to launch an English education project in Kenya this summer. (Photo by Cynthia Rockwell.)

Claudia Kahindi ’18, left, and Olayinka Lawal ’15 will use a Davis Projects for Peace grant to launch an English education project in Kenya this summer. (Photo by Cynthia Rockwell.)

#THISISWHY

Claudia Kahindi ’18 and Olayinka Lawal ’15 have received a $10,000 Davis Projects for Peace grant to launch KIU, an English education project, in Kahindi’s home area of coastal Kenya this summer. Named for the Swahili word for “thirst,” KIU will serve more than 100 fourth-grade students at Kahindi’s alma mater, Kilimo Public Primary School, in Kenya’s Kilifi County.

Mentors Share Experience with Female Student-Athletes

#THISISWHY

On April 17,  more than 30 alumni, parents and community members and 80 student-athletes participated in an Alumni Athletics Mentoring Workshop in Beckham Hall. As part of the program, mentors met with female student-athletes to speak about career options.

Student-athlete Melissa Leung ’16 has first-hand knowledge of the workshop’s value. “At last year’s event, I met my mentor, Clare Colton ’12,” says Leung, who attended the event for the second year in a row. “Clare provided resume and email etiquette advice and connected me with Jim Citrin (P’12 P’14), senior director of Spencer Stuart, who created an internship position for me with Spencer Stuart in Shanghai last semester, during my semester abroad.”

(Photos by Dat Vu ’15.)

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Former Wesleyan field hockey and lacrosse player Suzi Byers ’94 shares her experience with Rosemary Martin ’16 at the mentoring event.

Students in Natural Sciences and Mathematics Present Research

#THISISWHY

On April 17, 30 senior and BA/MA students in the Natural Sciences and Mathematics Division presented their research to the Wesleyan community. Nearly 100 people attended the annual Celebration of Science Theses poster session, which was held in the Exley Science Center lobby.

The event was co-organized by Manju Hingorani, professor of molecular biology and biochemistry; Barbara Juhasz, associate professor of psychology, associate professor of neuroscience and behavior, director of the service learning center; and Seth Redfield, assistant professor of astronomy. (Photos by Dat Vu ’15.)

Dara Lorn '15 discussed his research, "Progress to Biofunctionalized Rotaxanes."

Dara Lorn ’15 discussed his research, “Progress to Biofunctionalized Rotaxanes.”

Faculty, Staff Share Service- and Project-Based Learning Stories

#THISISWHY

On April 15, faculty and staff met to share their service- and project-based learning stories during an Academic (Technology) Roundtable lunch at the Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life. A(T)R lunches are designed to promote conversation, cooperation and the sharing of information, ideas and resources among faculty members, librarians, graduate students and staff.

Barbara Juhasz, director of service-learning, associate professor of psychology, associate professor of neuroscience and behavior, led the session, providing an overview of service-learning at Wesleyan as well as the variety of ways that service can be used as a pedagogical tool. Other speakers included Rob Rosenthal, director of the Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life, John E. Andrus Professor of Sociology; Peggy Carey-Best, Health Professions Partnership Initiative advisor; Cathy Lechowicz, director of the Center for Community Partnerships; Sara MacSorley, director of the Green Street Teaching and Learning Center; Janet Burge, associate professor of computer science; Jim Donady, professor of biology, director of Health Professions Partnership Initiative; Anna Shusterman, associate professor of psychology; and Katja Kolcio, associate professor of dance.

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Jim Donady discusses his ongoing service-learning work at Connecticut Valley Hospital. Left to right: Donady; Sara MacSorley, who shared how service-learning courses can interface with programs at Green Street; Janet Burge, who spoke about how project-based activities are incorporated into her service-learning course, Software Engineering; and Director of Service Learning Barbara Juhasz.

 

Grad Student Ranasinghe Speaks on Computational Chemistry

#THISISWHY

Duminda Ranasinghe, a Ph.D. candidate in Chemistry, spoke April 16 in Exley in the fourth event of the Graduate Student Speaker Series. (Photos by Hannah Norman ’16.)

Ranasinghe gave a talk titled “Computational Chemistry: Chemistry Without Chemical.”

Ranasinghe gave a talk titled “Computational Chemistry: Chemistry Without Chemical.”

Computational chemistry uses quantum mechanics to predict reactions and molecular properties.

Computational chemistry uses quantum mechanics to predict reactions and molecular properties.

Over the past decade, computational chemistry has become popular with chemists as a tool to explore reactions and molecules. At Wesleyan, researchers are making reliable computational methods, which are accurate and faster than what is currently available.

Over the past decade, computational chemistry has become popular with chemists as a tool to explore reactions and molecules. At Wesleyan, researchers are making reliable computational methods, which are accurate and faster than what is currently available.

Csere Receives Social Justice Employee Award

David Csere, winner of the Morgenstern-Clarren Social Justice Award, is known for his legendary grilled cheese sandwiches and knack for memorizing student's birthdays.

David Csere, winner of the Morgenstern-Clarren Social Justice Award, is known for his legendary grilled cheese sandwiches and knack for memorizing student’s birthdays.

#THISISWHY

In this Q&A we sit down with David McClure Csere, chef for Bon Appétit, recipient of the 2015 Morgenstern-Clarren Social Justice Employee Prize. The award was created in 2009 in memory of Peter Morgenstern-Clarren ‘03 who pursued social justice while a student at Wesleyan. Morgenstern-Clarren’s activism included securing benefits for Wesleyan custodial staff, participating in the United Student and Labor Action Committee, and contributing his leadership to the campus chapter of Amnesty International. Peter’s parents, Dr. Hadley Morgenstern-Clarren and the honorable Pat Morgenstern-Clarren of Shaker Heights, Ohio, are sponsoring this award that honors their son’s activism for the public good.

Q: When and why did you decide to work for Wesleyan?

A: When I graduated from UCONN I worked a sales job and didn’t really like it. I wanted to work with my hands, to make things from scratch. After working odd jobs, I was finally given an opportunity to work as a cook, and then took classes to develop my chef skills. It was basically an apprenticeship program. After completing that training program, I applied to Wesleyan and was offered a job. That was in 1983, so I’ve worked here for more than 31 years.

Q: What is the best part about working for Wesleyan?

A: Meeting and interacting with the students. I like to go to at least one game of all of the Wesleyan sports each year. I also attend the senior thesis video and art projects.

Pinette, Brown, Lenten Honored with Cardinal Achievement Award

#THISISWHY

Lisa Pinette, library assistant V, was recently presented with a Cardinal Achievement Award for her work on the Signage Task Force, creating more than 200 new and color-coded signs installed in Olin Memorial Library and the Science Library.

Pinette coordinated a group effort to select sign styles that would allow for future changes as needed, solicited input from library staff, worked with University Communications on the design, and ensured that all signs were ADA compliant. Finally, she hired a company to manufacture and install the signs.

“The signs look great and provide wonderful consistency and clarity from floor to floor in the Library,” said Diane Klare, interim university librarian.

Lechowicz Honored with State Community Service Award

Cathy Lechowicz, director of the Center for Community Partnerships, right, displaying her award with William Dyson, chairman of the Connecticut Commission on Community Service, and Jane Ciarleglio, executive director of the Commission.

Cathy Lechowicz, director of the Center for Community Partnerships, right, displaying her award with William Dyson, chairman of the Connecticut Commission on Community Service, and Jane Ciarleglio, executive director of the Commission.

#THISISWHY

Cathy Lechowicz, director of the Center for Community Partnerships, was one of six people honored with a 2015 Community Service Award by the Connecticut Commission on Community Service and the Office of Higher Education. The winners–drawn from college students, campus programs and faculty and staff–were recognized at a ceremony April 14 at the Connecticut State Capitol.

This was the 23rd annual awards ceremony conducted by the Connecticut Commission on Community Service. More than 50 students, faculty and staff attended the ceremony.

“I am humbled by the recognition and grateful to work with an incredible team of people at Allbritton, on campus and in the community,” said Lechowicz. “Wesleyan has been extremely supportive of our community engagement initiatives and I’m looking forward to further developing our programs.”