Campus News & Events

Students Gather to Honor Atlanta Victims, Combat Anti-Asian Violence

vigil

Students organized a vigil on March 30 to reflect on a recent attack against Asians and Asian Americans. (Photo by Nathaniel Pugh ’21)

On March 30, more than 150 students gathered outside Usdan University Center for a community vigil to mourn the victims of the March 16 Atlanta spa shootings and to create a safe space for Asian and Asian-American students to discuss the rise of anti-Asian violence and be heard by the community.

The vigil was organized by Emily Chen ’23, Kevin Le ’22, and graduate student Emily Moon, in conjunction with members of the Asian American Student Collective.

Students read poems, played music, and shared their reflections during the event. Towards the end, the organizers gave anyone moved to speak the opportunity to do so.

Smolkin Speaks about the History of Soviet Atheism on Moscow Radio Station

Victoria Smolkin

Victoria Smolkin

On March 28, Victoria Smolkin, associate professor of history and chair, Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies, was featured on the radio station Echo of Moscow.

Smolkin spoke on Soviet atheism on Irina Prokhorova’s program “Culture of Everyday Life.” The podcast is available in Russian online here.

Smolkin is the author of A Sacred Space Is Never Empty: A History of Soviet Atheism, which was recently translated into Russian.

Atheism prevailed in Soviet ideology, especially in the 1920s and 1930s. However, religion never fully disappeared from the life of Russia and the Soviet republics. In the broadcast, Smolkin and fellow panelists discussed why the Soviet government fought so hard against the church and religion, how Soviet atheism differs from the atheism of Western intellectuals, and how the history of Soviet atheism influenced the craving for mysticism and esotericism in Russia in the 1990s, among other topics.

Grossman Co-Authors Article on British Stock Market

Grossman

Richard Grossman

Richard Grossman, professor of economics, recently co-authored an article titled “Before the Cult of Equity: the British Stock Market, 1829-1929” in European Review of Economic History, published on March 24, 2021.

According to the paper’s abstract, the co-authors “analyze the development and performance of the British equity market during the era when it reigned supreme as the largest in the world. By using an extensive monthly dataset of thousands of companies, we identify the major peaks and troughs in the market and find a relationship with the timing of economic cycles. We also show that the equity risk premium was modest and, contrary to previous research, domestic and foreign stocks earned similar returns for much of the period. We also document the early dominance of the transport and finance sectors and the subsequent emergence of many new industries.”

Dierker to Teach Passion-Driven Statistics As Fulbright Specialist

dierker

Lisa Dierker began her four-year term as a Fulbright Specialist in January.

As a recipient of a Fulbright Specialist Award, Professor Lisa Dierker hopes to connect with academic partners across the world sharing her expertise and excitement in support of data analytics.

“High quality, accessible and manageable data have never been so critical to the well-being of people around the world,” Dierker said. “Increasing capacity to identify, gather and analyze relevant data is a key pathway for better-informed decision-making and will create a larger, more diverse workforce.”

Dierker, Walter Crowell University Professor of Social Sciences, professor of psychology and education studies, is a co-creator of Wesleyan’s “Passion-Driven Statistics” model, a data-driven, project-based introductory curriculum backed by the National Science Foundation. This flexible curriculum engages students from a range of disciplines with large, real-world data sets and code-based analytic software (e.g. SAS, R, Python, Stata, etc.), providing experience in the rich, complicated, decision-making process of real statistical inquiry. The model is being taught nationwide in colleges and universities and has reached more than 50,000 people worldwide through the Coursera class, Data Analysis and Interpretation, taught by Dierker and Jennifer Rose, professor of the practice in the Center for Pedagogical Innovation.

Wesleyan in the News

Several Wesleyan faculty and alumni have appeared in national media outlets recently. They include:

March 23
The Island Now – Earth Matters – A Brief History of Long Island Sound. Mentions that in 1892, 23 students at Wesleyan came down with typhoid, with four deaths, from eating contaminated oysters.

Morning Star via PR Newswire – College Consensus Publishes Aggregate Ranking of the 100 Best Colleges & Universities for 2021. Mentions Wesleyan.

Sugarcane Magazine – Incarcerated Poets Laureate: Recognizing Unseen Creators in Florida. Mentions that through his nonprofit, O, Miami, P. Scott Cunningham ’00 builds community through literature.

March 24
Market Screener – Lyndsey Layton ’86, a longtime editor and reporter at The Washington Post, will be the new deputy editor for policy for The New York Times Climate desk.

Patch – Reads Together: All Black Kids’ Author. Mentions that president emerita of Spelman College Beverly Daniel Tatum ’75, Hon’15, P’04 led a conversation on “Race and Racism.”

Associated Press – Fulcrum Therapeutics Appoints Dunn as President of Research and Development. Features Judith A. Dunn PhD ’98.

Hamlet Hub – Conversations: “Truth, Myth and Democracy” at Ridgefield (CT) Library. Mentions that Western Connecticut State University psychology professor Daniel Barrett ’86 will moderate the discussion.

PR Web – The Top 100 Stanford MBA Alumni In Finance & Investing. Mentions Wesleyan’s Chief Investment Officer Anne Martin.

The Middletown Press – Wesleyan student named Middletown Newman Civic Fellow. Features Emily McEvoy ’22.

March 25
90.5 WCBE via NPR – The Chauvin Trial Isn’t Technically About Race – But Jury Selection For It Has Been. Quotes Sonali Chakravarti, associate professor of government, “who has studied the role of race in jury selection.”

Profit Quotes – Lacuna Technologies Adds New Board of Directors. Mentions Rashida Richardson ’08, who “brings over a decade of experience as a lawyer, researcher, and advocate specializing in race, emerging technologies and the law to the Lacuna Board of Directors.”

Street Insider – Gran Tierra news. Mentions Sondra Scott ’88, COO of Verisk Financial, who “has more than 25 years of experience as an energy and risk analytics business leader.”

Street Insider – Vertiv Holdings Co. news. Mentions Jacob Kotzubei ’91, who was selected to serve on the Vertiv Holdings Board “due to his experience in executive management oversight, private equity, capital markets, mergers and acquisitions, and other transactional matters.”

DNYUZ – Poem: Note to Black Women in America. Features a poem by Honorée Fanonne Jeffers whose latest collection, “The Age of Phillis,” was published by Wesleyan University Press.

Market Screener – IMV Inc. Appoints Kuvalanka to Board of Directors. Mentions that Kyle Kuvalanka ’90 serves as Chief Financial Officer and Chief Operating Officer at Goldfinch Bio, a kidney precision medicines company.

March 26
The Middletown Press – Middlesex United Way: Workplace campaigns create a lasting impact on communities. Mentions that Wesleyan “increased its overall campaign by $4,000 compared to last year.”

March 27
Washington Post – What Derek Chauvin’s trial in the death of George Floyd means for America. Quotes Sonali Chakravarti, associate professor of government.

Variety – NAACP Image Awards 2021: The Complete Televised Winners List. Mentions “The Age of Phillis” by Honorée Jeffers (Wesleyan University Press) is the winner of the Outstanding Literary Work – Poetry category.

March 28
Cornell Sun – S.A. Debates Ethics of University Partnership With Chinese Universities and ICE. Mentions that Wesleyan has established itself as a sanctuary campus for undocumented students.

Reality Times – Can’t Sleep? Why Your House Might Be To Blame And What You Can Do About It. Mentions a study at Wesleyan “found that subjects who sniffed lavender oil for two minutes at three, 10-minute intervals before bedtime increased their amount of deep sleep and felt more vigorous in the morning.”

CPTV – Diana Martinez ’07, assistant director of the Jewett Center for Community Partnerships, was featured on the CUTLINE series as a facilitator for “Democracy and Community with UConn Democracy & Dialogues Initiative.” (Martinez begins speaking at 24:14.)

March 29
Associated Press – McDonald’s Names Desiree Ralls-Morrison as General Counsel and Corporate Secretary. Features Desiree Ralls-Morrison ’88, P’21, who earned a “bachelor of arts in economics and political science from Wesleyan.”

News Times – Middletown’s two first – and only – female mayors broke much ground. Quotes Former Middletown Mayor Domenique Thornton: “We have a wonderful, vibrant downtown community, especially with [Wesleyan University] and the (Connecticut) river. You have cultural diversity in theater, the hearts, and a central location. This is a hidden gem.”

Independent Mail – Catherine Coleman Flowers is always in ‘good trouble.’ It’s a blessing for rural America. Features Catherine Coleman Flowers, who will receive an honorary degree from Wesleyan during the 2021 Commencement.

Shoot – Director Haymon Joins O Positive For Commercials. Features Miranda Haymon ’16, visiting instructor of theater.

Business Insider – One of America’s Richest Black People is Hiding in Plain Sight. Features Herriot Tabuteau ’89 (subscription needed).

March 30
Celebrity Mirror – 5 Facts About Producer Grillo, She Was David O. Russell’s Wife And Baby Mama. Features Janet Grillo ’80 who “graduated with a magna cum laude and special honors in theater from Wesleyan.”

Street Insider – Western New England Bancorp news. Mentions executive director John Bonini ’90, “who assumed the position of General Counsel on January 1, 2021.”

Street Insider – INX Limited news. Mentions David Weild ’78, the founder, chairman and CEO of Weild & Co., Inc.

View other recent Wesleyan in the News stories here.

Stamford Advocate – Middletown’s Community Health Center to receive $16.2 million in COVID relief. Mentions the COVID-19 mass vaccination clinic at Wesleyan.

Talking Biz News – Politico reporter Maldonado set to depart. Features Samantha Maldonado ’13, energy and environment reporter at Politico, who Maldonado has a “BA in sociology and creative writing from Wesleyan University.”

March 31
The Day – History Matters: The day the music died. Mentions Neely Bruce, John Spencer Camp Professor of Music, “who is an American music scholar and one of the founders of the New England Sacred Harp Convention.”

Journal Now – Wake Forest football notebook: Mentions Ben Thaw ’20, who was promoted to graduate assistant after spending the fall of 2020 as a recruiting intern for the Deacons.

Street Insider – Helix Acquisition Corp news. Mentions John Schmid ’85, who “currently serves as a member of the board of directors of AnaptysBio, Inc., Neos Therapeutics, Inc., Poseida Therapeutics, Inc., Xeris Pharmaceuticals, Inc., and Forge Therapeutics, Inc., all pharmaceutical companies, and as the chairman of the board of directors of Speak, Inc., a speakers bureau, which he helped found in 1989.”

Insider – 56 celebrities you probably forgot guest-starred on ‘How I Met Your Mother.’ Mentions Wesleyan.

Rochester Business Journal – Clark Patterson Lee news. Mentions that Susannah Betts ’15 has been hired as a marketing coordinator and has a bachelor’s degree in physics from Wesleyan.

Street Insider – Oaktree Acquisition Corp. Mentions John Frank ’78, P’12, who “holds a BA degree with honors in history from Wesleyan” and “is a Trustee of Wesleyan University.”

Tumblehome – Upcoming Tumbleocity Programs. Mentions that Ellen Prager ’84 will speak to children on April 7 about adventures in Ilulissat, Greenland.

April 1
Artforum – A History of Violence. Mentions “Little Poems in Prose” translated by Keith Waldrop and published by Wesleyan University Press.

Eyewitness News 3 WFSB New Britain – Colleges preparing to offer vaccines to students. Mentions that the Community Health Center Inc. will be hosting a two-day walk-up clinic for Wesleyan University students later this month.

Fox 61 – Wesleyan University planning to offer COVID-19 vaccines on all-campus students. Mentions the Wesleyan Argus and Dean Rick Culliton.

Darien Times – Wesleyan University students enjoy spring break safely on Middletown campus. Mentions that Wesleyan University students welcomed a two-day study hiatus during spring break, March 23-24. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, students remained in Middletown during the recess.

PR Newsire – College Consensus Publishes Aggregate Consensus Ranking of the 100 Best National Liberal Arts Colleges for 2021. Mentions Wesleyan.

April 2
Stamford Advocate – Wesleyan University Professor Talks Ocean Exploration in Vox Podcast. Features Suzanne OConnell, professor of earth and environmental sciences.

Patch – Fishers in Connecticut: A Zoom Talk at Canton Library. Features Wildlife Conservationist Paul Colburn ’79, who will lead a discussion on April 28.

Street Insider – Catabasis Pharmaceuticals, Inc.. news. Mentions Michael Kishbauch ’71, P’07 who has a “BA in biology from Wesleyan University.”

April 3
The San Diego Union-Tribune – Arthur Kopit, three-time Tony-nominated playwright, dies. Features Arthur Kopit P’05, who taught at Wesleyan.

San Mateo Daily Journal – San Mateo announces new city attorney. Features Prasanna Rasiah ’94, who “graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in history from Wesleyan University.”

April 5
The Middletown Press – Chamber On the Move. Mentions that Wesleyan President Michael Roth ’78 will deliver the keynote address for the Annual Business & Education Partnership and Hal Kaplan Middletown Mentor Program Recognition Luncheon on April 27.

The Nation – Among the Rank and File: Nikolai Gogol in the twilight of empire. Mentions that “in a new collection of Gogol’s short stories, translated by Susanne Fusso, a professor of Russian studies at Wesleyan University, readers are reintroduced to the familiar cast of characters-identified by their rank, of course-that populate many of the Ukrainian author’s most celebrated works, including The Nose and The Overcoat.”

MSN – See What Julia Louis-Dreyfus’ Sons Look Like All Grown Up. Features Julia Louis-Dreyfus Hall P’14 and Henry Hall ’14, whose band, “Grand Cousin, got their start when Henry was still a student at Wesleyan University.”

The Philadelphia Inquirer – New film office prize goes to a screenwriter who rediscovered herself in Philly. Mentions Matthew Frishkoff ’21, “a Wesleyan University senior,” who won a $500 prize for best student script.

Raw Story – How the media got hoodwinked by Republican talking points. Features an op-ed by John Stoehr, a former visiting assistant professor of public policy.

The Middletown Press – Danbury vaccination clinic reaches 1,000 shots per day as area COVID cases continue to climb. Mentions that Middletown’s Community Health Center plans to hold clinics with Wesleyan University before students return home at the end of the semester.

April 6
Street Insider – Invitation Homes Inc. news. Mentions John Rhea ’87.

Street Insider – CSG Systems International news. Mentions Frank V. Sica ’73.

Herald Chronicle – Chegg hires Sony Executive Lauren Glotzer as new Chief Strategy Officer. Features Lauren Glotzer ’94.

Hartford Courant – Hartford coffee shop Story and Soil expanding into Middletown. Story and Soil is expanding to a second location inside Wesleyan RJ Julia Booksellers in Middletown.

Press Telegram – Ontario-raised poet John Murillo receives Claremont’s $100,000 Kingsley Tufts Award. Features John Murillo, assistant professor of English, who was named the 2021 winner of the Kingsley Tufts Award for his recent collection Kontemporary Amerikan Poetry.

View all recent Wesleyan in the News stories here.

Östör Celebrates 6 Films Featured at Smithsonian Festival

Ákos Östör, professor of anthropology, emeritus, and his wife, Lina Fruzzetti, a professor of anthropology at Brown University, co-produced six films that are now being included in a retrospective hosted by the Smithsonian’s Recovering Voices Initiative for the annual Mother Tongue Film Festival.

The festival features diverse films which explore language and knowledge around the world. This year’s theme is “The Healing Power of Storytelling.” While the festival must take place online due to the COVID-19 pandemic, each film is available to stream throughout the spring for a certain window of time. Östör and Fruzzetti also participated in a virtual roundtable discussion on March 19 to discuss their films through an anthropological lens.

Of Östör and Fruzzetti’s six films in the festival, one is a documentary feature and the other five are documentary shorts.

mother's house The feature film, titled In My Mother’s House (2017), follows Fruzzetti as she uncovers the history of her Italian father and her Eritrean mother after receiving a letter from a long-lost relative. The film is set in the United States, Italy, and Eritrea as Fruzzetti learns more about the intersection of her family’s past and the history of these countries through her travels.

At the roundtable discussion, Fruzzetti spoke about the process of telling her mother’s story.

“Here is a story of a woman that gets appropriated across generations of people [who] come to see it,” Fruzzetti said. “But most people…tell us how the film affected them. We had no idea that’s what [would] happen to the film. My interest in the film isn’t in the technicalities of the filmmaking itself, but in the ethnography of it, in the stories that it tells. And every film, I think, has a powerful story that it can tell.”

Östör mentioned how working on In My Mother’s House combined different aspects of his and Fruzzetti’s professional work.

“Even in this film, very personal, the extraordinary thing was how much our work in publication and films and anthropology…coincided and brought together what I like to call the ethnographer’s knowledge with the filmmaker’s art and craft, and then developed these to the betterment of both,” Östör said.

He added that the intersection of anthropology and filmmaking happened naturally for himself and Fruzzetti.

“We never made a decision about whether we were doing film or anthropology. It was, again, because of this ethnographic critical knowledge… we had in the background [that] allowed us to respond,” Östör said.

Östör also spoke about his collaboration with Fruzzetti.

“The first few films in Bengal in fact gave a basis for what we did later,” Östör said. “But the pivotal film that we came to work on together was Seed and Earth, and this one was the product of various circumstances and unexpected developments in the field. But again, the background of fieldwork allowed us to…adapt and deal with what was the reality in front of us.”

Fruzzetti talked about the motivations for making such documentary films.

“All of these films we worked on, we didn’t think that we were doing them to get across [that] this is about change,” Fruzzetti said. “The person seeing them has to decide for himself or herself.”

She emphasized that such films hold the power to change people’s thought processes.

“[Ethnographic films] do change how we think about other people,” Fruzzetti said. “But [they] also change the people themselves who are a part of these films. It’s not like we went thinking ‘this is what’s going to happen.’ You don’t really know.”

Östör highlighted that the films were not intended to change situations, rather, he said they were made to hold up a mirror to life.

“We didn’t set out to make a film that was an intervention or that was investigative reporting, Östör said. “There are a lot of films today that are just that. Some of these films have been recently criticized, for example that they don’t interfere enough, that they don’t instigate. Our answer is that we try to be true to the truth and to the reality.”

The other five of Östör and Fruzzetti’s films are the following documentary shorts:

Seed and Earth (1995), set in India, follows the lives of two brothers and their families in West Bengal through a lens of age and gender.

Khalfan and Zanzibar (2000), set in Zanzibar, Tanzania. The film showcases Khalfan Hamid Khalfan, who runs the Association of the Disabled in Zanzibar, while exploring the island’s history and culture, as well as following members of its disabled population.

Fishers of Dar (2001), set in Tanzania, follows fishermen in Dar es Salaam for a day as they travel to the market and the harbor to carry out their work. Steven Ross ’75 directed the film.

Singing Pictures (2005), set in India, follows a group of women in the village of Naya who formed a cooperative focused on scroll-painting, which they learn and then practice. Their work changes to include contemporary concerns such as women’s issues and other concerns in their society.

Songs of a Sorrowful Man (2009), set in India, centers around Dukhashyam, an artist whose work focuses on Sufism, community engagement, and passing down the knowledge of art history and techniques with future artists.

 

E&ES Seniors Conduct Capstone Research at Wesleyan’s Long Lane Forest

EES capstone

During the Earth and Environmental Sciences Senior Field Research Project presentations on March 19, Phil Resor, professor of earth and environmental sciences, showed a map of Wesleyan’s Long Lane Forest. Here, three student groups spent the past semester studying the vegetation soils on the property; how the forest changed over time using historical imagery; and how the groundwater underneath the forest interacts with precipitation on the surface.

EES

Students and faculty from the E&ES497 class gather on the Long Lane field property near the forest.

Ten students majoring in earth and environmental science (E&ES) have completed their senior capstone projects.

Each year, seniors in the major embark on a capstone experience that starts with a seminar in the fall (E&ES497) in which students design an original research project, go on a field trip to carry out the research and complete their fieldwork, and then analyze their results and present them in written reports and oral presentations. In past years, students have ventured across the globe for their field trips. However, the pandemic caused this year’s projects to look a little different. This time, the field trips took place in a spot nearer and dearer to their hearts—Wesleyan’s Long Lane Forest, which is just a half-mile west from the heart of campus.

McEvoy ’22 Named 2021 Campus Compact Newman Civic Fellow

Emily McEvoy

As Newman Civic Fellow, Emily McEvoy will join 211 other community-committed students from the U.S. and Mexico for access to a variety of virtual and in-person learning opportunities during the 2021–2022 academic year. McEvoy has a deep-rooted interest in town-gown relations with the City of Middletown. (Photo by Willow Saxon ’24)

When Emily McEvoy ’22 began her college career at Wesleyan in 2018, she felt a deep sense of detachment from the local environment. At a campus in the middle of her home state, how could this be? The insularity, she says, was jarring, and she decided to dedicate her time to combat this issue.

McEvoy immediately became involved with several local organizations, including Middletown’s North End Action Team, and the student cohort of volunteers who helped staff their office. Most recently, McEvoy has been an organizer with the Middletown Mutual Aid Collective, which has raised close to $70,000 to support Middletown residents in need.

“I developed a love for canvassing the neighborhood,” McEvoy said. “I like personal conversations with people, and I like deeply understanding the histories and issues at the table . . . before I do anything else.”

McEvoy’s leadership efforts hadn’t gone unnoticed, and in March, she was named a Campus Compact 2021 Newman Civic Fellow.

Wesleyan’s 189th Commencement to Be Held May 26 In Person

monogramWesleyan’s 189th Commencement will take place in person on Wednesday, May 26.

“This year’s Commencement was previously planned for May 30; however, due to a number of factors, including current pandemic conditions and cancellation of an in-person reunion weekend, we have decided to move up the date,” Wesleyan President Michael Roth ’78 said in a campus-wide email.

The University is hoping that conditions will allow for two guests per graduate to attend the ceremony. Wesleyan is pursuing plans to accommodate the seniors and other graduates who have been studying remotely to return to campus for Commencement exercises.

As with all of Wesleyan’s COVID-related policies and guidelines, these plans are tentative and subject to change if conditions necessitate. The University will continue to communicate regarding more specific details of Commencement in the coming weeks.

“I am very much looking forward to seeing our graduates on Andrus Field on May 26, and celebrating the accomplishments of the formidable Class of 2021,” Roth said.

Wesleyan’s reunion events will move to a virtual format.

Gilmore, Alumni Author Papers in 7 Journals

Martha Gilmore, George I. Seney Professor of Geology and professor of earth and environmental sciences, is the co-author of seven new papers and articles. These include:

Distinct Mineralogy and Age of Individual Lava Flows in Atla Regio, Venus Derived From Magellan Radar Emissivity,” published in the March 2021 issue of JGR: Planets. Gilmore’s former postdoc Jeremy Brossier, Katie Toner ’20 and Avi Stein ’17 co-authored this paper.

The Venus Life Equation,” published online in the January 2021 issue of Astrobiology.

Variations in the radiophysical properties of tesserae and mountain belts on Venus: Classification and mineralogical trends,” published in the February 2021 issue of Icarus.

Venus tesserae feature layered, folded, and eroded rocks,” published in the January 2021 issue of Geology.

Long-duration Venus Lander for Seismic and Atmospheric Science,” published in the October 2020 issue of Planetary and Space Science.

Low radar emissivity signatures on Venus volcanoes and coronae: New insights on relative composition and age,” published in the June 2020 issue of Icarus. Gilmore’s former postdoc Jeremy Brossier and Katie Toner ’20 co-authored this paper.

Present-day volcanism on Venus as evidenced from weathering rates of olivine,” published in the January 2020 issue of Science Advances.

In addition, “Felsic tesserae on Venus permitted by lithospheric deformation models,” written alongside and Beck Straley ’07 and Phillip Resor, professor of earth and environmental sciences, is scheduled for publication in the Journal of Geophysical Research later this year.

OConnell Talks Ocean Exploration in Vox Podcast

Suzanne O'Connell

Suzanne OConnell

Suzanne OConnell, professor of earth and environmental sciences, is featured on Vox Media’s podcast Unexplainable in a March 17 episode titled “Journey Toward the Center of the Earth.”

The podcast explores unanswered scientific questions about mysterious aspects of the world and examines what scientists are doing to find answers. The episode with OConnell delves into a 20th-century quest to drill into the Earth’s layers through the ocean, specifically to learn more about a very dense region between the crust and the mantle called the Mohorovičić discontinuity, or the Moho.

“Project Moho was a bust, but it lay a foundation for exploring the ocean, which hadn’t been done before,” OConnell said in the podcast. “We still don’t know that much about it, and every day, almost, we learn something so exciting and so important about our planet.”

OConnell explained that drilling into the ocean allowed scientists to learn about past life and climate on Earth and discover life in the remotest depths of the ocean floor.

“Drilling into the surface sediment, we had no idea what the surface sediment of the ocean was like, and it defined a whole new field of geoscience: paleoceanography,” OConnell said. “And there could be a whole new field of mantle rheology that could be discovered with more pieces of mantle material.”

Read an accompanying Vox article titled “How an ill-fated undersea adventure in the 1960s changed the way scientists see the Earth” online here.

 

Wesleyan in the News

Several Wesleyan faculty and alumni have appeared in national media outlets recently. They include:

March 10
EIN Presswire – AcademicInfluence.com Announces the Top-Ranked Private Graduate Schools in the U.S. for 2021. Mentions Wesleyan.

March 11
The Middletown Press – Wesleyan University: COVID tests essential for return to in-person learning. Focuses on Wesleyan employees’ efforts in creating the COVID-19 testing site.

Market Screener – Safari Energy Reaches 500th Commercial Solar Project. Mentions that Safari Energy’s first project was a small, three-kilowatt (kW) solar system installed at Wesleyan and how “that project was quickly expanded with the addition of a 92 kW rooftop solar system and a 111 kW solar parking canopy system at the university.”

Market Screener – Langham Hospitality Investments: Re-election of Retiring Directors. Mentions that economics major Ceajer Keung Chan ’79 has been an independent non-executive director of the company since August 2018.

The New London Day, via Yahoo News – Students adapt as pandemic continues to affect higher learning. Mentions Yalissa Rodriguez ’23, “a 19-year-old sophomore at Wesleyan University studying neuroscience.”

March 12
American Theatre – Old Globe Names 2021 Classical Directing Fellows. Mentions Edward Torres, assistant professor of the practice in theater.

American Theatre – Where the Year Went: A Look Back, and Forward. Features Katie Pearl, assistant professor of theater.

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education – Three Black Scholars Appointed to Endowed Chairs at Yale University. Mentions Tavia Nyong’o ’95.

Santa Fe New Mexican, Pasatiempo – Watching the incarnations go by: “Being Ram Dass.” Mentions James Lytton ’69 (Rameshwar Das) and Wesleyan.

AZ Central/USA Today – 30 years of designing award-winning images, this former Creative Director launches her 2nd career as a fine art painter. Features artist, art director, and graphic designer Amy Feil Phillips ’81.

Stamford Advocate – Intelligent.com Announces Best Colleges In Connecticut for 2021. Mentions Wesleyan.

March 13
The New York Times – Enjoy a Book Tour in Your Living Room. Mentions author Kaitlyn Greenidge ’04.

Middletown Press – Acclaimed Poet and Memoirist Chosen as Wesleyan’s Graduation Speaker. Features Wesleyan.

CT Post – Vaccinated students still need to be tested. Mentions that Wesleyan reported three new cases of COVID-19 this past week.

All Events In – Art History from Home: Stories from the Collection. Mentions Josh Lubin-Levy ’06, visiting instructor in curatorial practice in performance.

March 14
The List – Net Worth: The Hamilton Star Makes More Than You Think. Features Lin-Manuel Miranda ’02, Hon. ’15.

Daily Republic – Mystery author virtual guest of Solano County Library. Features Edwin Hill ’93.

March 15
Newsfeeds Media – In the Heights Drops Two Trailers Plus New Photos. Mentions Lin-Manuel Miranda ’02, Hon. ’15, and Wesleyan.

Worcester Business Journal – Movers & Shakers. Mentions retired investment professional Cynthia Strauss ’76 and Wesleyan.

March 16
Boston Review – Derek Chauvin and the Myth of the Impartial Juror. Op-ed by Associate Professor of Government Sonali Chakravarti.

PressFrom – Bill Belichick opened up the wallet, but will it work? Mentions Bill Belichick ’75, P’07, Hon.’15 and Wesleyan.

Middletown Police Department via Facebook – Thanks Wesleyan’s Office of Public Safety for raising over $430 for a local family displaced by a fire.

March 17
Middletown Press – Middletown Pride fest to kick off Pride Month with a virtual parade. Wesleyan is a sponsor.

Market Screener – Flywire Launches eStore. Wesleyan uses Flywire to improve process efficiencies and reduce financial risk. Quotes Controller Valerie Nye.

Vox – How an ill-fated undersea adventure in the 1960s changed the way scientists see the Earth. Features geologist Suzanne OConnell, professor of earth and environmental sciences.

Digital Music News – Audiomack Hires “Heems” Suri To Oversee South Asian Expansion. Mentions that Audiomack appointed Himanshu Suri ’07 to the newly created position of director of marketing and South Asian music strategy.

Roswell Park — Subspecialists Take On New Leadership Roles with Roswell Park Pathology Team. Mentions Dr. Gregory Freund ’83 and Wesleyan.

PBS NewsHour – In ‘Grief and Grievance,’ Black artists explore aspects of loss in contemporary life. Quotes Glenn Ligon ’82.

Vanity Fair – The Angelification of Girls: Winx Club as a neo-liberal-catholic project. Mentions Ellen Nerenberg, Hollis Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures, professor of Italian (article appears in Italian)

March 18
Street Insider – Form 10-K SQZ Biotechnologies. Features bio on Amy Schulman ’82, P’11.

Connecticut Patch — Obituary for Ann M. Wightman, 70, of Middletown. Mentions the Ann Wightman Scholarship Fund, Wesleyan University. Whitman was a professor of history, emerita.

Screen Rant – How I Met Your Mother: 5 Times The Show Was Sex Positive (& 5 It Wasn’t). Mentions the characters attended Wesleyan.

Smithsonian Magazine – How Film Helps Preserve the World’s Diversity. Mentions filmmaker Ákos Östör, professor of anthropology, emeritus.

The Good Men Project – We Can’t Fight Climate Change Without Valuing Nature: Healthy Ecosystems Essential to Meeting Paris Agreement. Mentions Wesleyan University economist Gary Yohe, Huffington Foundation Professor of Economics and Environmental Studies, Emeritus.

Street Insider – Form 424B4 Olo Inc. Mentions Warren Smith Jr. ’78, who “is a Trustee Emeritus of Wesleyan University and is a former member of Wesleyan’s Investment Committee.”

March 19
Baltimore Sun – Annapolis mayor Gavin Buckley to present Patriots coach Bill Belichick ’75, P’07, Hon.’15 with keys to the city next month.

The New York Times – Excellence Runs in the Family. Her Novel’s Heroine Wants Something Else. Features Kaitlyn Greenidge ’04 and Kirsten Greenidge ’96.

March 21
Yahoo! news via The Los Angeles Times – Op-Ed: Forgiveness in an Age of Cancel Culture by Michael Roth ’78.

The New York Times – Greg Steltenpohl, Pioneer in Plant-Based Drinks, Dies at 66. Quotes Chris “Kiff” Gallagher ’91, a longtime friend who also worked with Mr. Steltenpohl.

Street Insider – Design Therapeutics news. Mentions John Schmid ’85.

Street Insider – Oaktree Acquisition Corp. news. Mentions Trustee John Frank ’78, P’12.

March 22
The List – What You Don’t Know about Lin-Manuel Miranda [’02, Hon.’15].

The Hollywood Reporter – NAACP Image Awards. Mentions the winner of  Outstanding Literary Work – Poetry The Age of Phillis – Honorée Jeffers published by Wesleyan University Press.

March 23
Street Insider – Frontier Group Holdings news. Mentions Howard Diamond ’89.