Tag Archive for art

Rudensky’s (’01) Photographs Exhibited in New York City Gallery

Sasha RudenskyPhotography by Sasha Rudensky ’01, assistant professor of art, is featured in an exhibition titled “Tinsel and Blue” from June 8 to July 16 at the Sasha Wolf Gallery, 70 Orchard Street, New York, N.Y.

Rudensky is a Russian-born artist whose work has been exhibited widely including at the Musee de l’Elysee in Lausanne, Switzerland; Fries Museum in Leewarden, Netherlands; Macro Testaccio Museum in Rome, Italy; ArtScience Museum in Singapore; and Danziger Projects in New York. In 2010, Rudensky’s work was included in “reGeneration 2: Photographers of Tomorrow Today,” an international survey of emerging photographers. Her work is held in a number of public collections including Musee de l’Elysee, Yale Art Gallery, and Center of Creative Photography in Tuscon, among others.

Rudensky received her MFA from Yale University School of Art in 2008 and BA from Wesleyan in 2001. She was the recipient of the Ward Cheney Memorial Award from Yale University, Mortimer-Hays Brandeis Traveling Fellowship, Leica/Jim Marshall Award, and Jessup Prize from Wesleyan. In 2013, Rudensky was awarded the Aaron Siskind Individual Fellowship grant. Her work has appeared in New York Times Magazine, Der Spiegel, Cicero Magazine, American Photo, PDN and others. She is currently head of the photography program at Wesleyan.

Sasha Rudensky

Sasha Rudensky at “Tinsel and Blue,” June 8. (Photo by Cynthia Rockwell)

Refugees’ Art Featured at Student-Run “Art in Crisis” Exhibit

The student-run Wesleyan Refugee Project is hosting an exhibit titled "Art in Crisis" through May 22 at the Center for the Humanities. Student organizers, faculty, members of the administration and artists gathered for the exhibit's opening May 4.

The student-run Wesleyan Refugee Project is hosting an exhibit titled “Art in Crisis” through May 22 at the Center for the Humanities. Student organizers, faculty, members of the administration and community members gathered for the exhibit’s opening May 4.

“Art in Crisis” features work by artists within Za'atari Refugee camp, the largest refugee camp in Amman, Jordan, home to over 100,000 refugees. These artists range from professionals who taught art in Syria to youth who were studying modern art to those who newly developed their passion in exile. The work was recently displayed at the Mission to the United Nations in New York City, and will be sold in a silent auction format.

“Art in Crisis” features work by artists within Za’atari Refugee camp, the largest refugee camp in Amman, Jordan, home to over 100,000 refugees. These artists range from professionals who taught art in Syria to youth who were studying modern art to those who newly developed their passion in exile. The work was recently displayed at the Mission to the United Nations in New York City, and will be sold in a silent auction format.

The Wesleyan Refugee Project is a volunteer initiative which centers around three central community outreach efforts, including online tutoring with Syrian refugee students in Turkey and Jordan, helping Connecticut-based refugees fill out subsidized housing and energy assistance applications, and aiding Iraqi refugees in finding U.S. employment via the International Refugee Assistance Program. Pictured is volunteer Elisabeth Arslanoglou '16.

The Wesleyan Refugee Project is a volunteer initiative which centers around three central community outreach efforts, including online tutoring with Syrian refugee students in Turkey and Jordan, helping Connecticut-based refugees fill out subsidized housing and energy assistance applications, and aiding Iraqi refugees in finding U.S. employment via the International Refugee Assistance Program. Pictured is volunteer Elisabeth Arslanoglou ’16.

Students Showcase Art at Painting Show

Thirteen students enrolled in Professor of Art Tula Telfair’s Painting I course (ARTS 439) displayed their artwork at a Painting Show Dec. 8 at Art Studio South.

This introductory-level course in painting (oils) emphasized work from observation and stressed the fundamentals of formal structure: color, paint manipulation, composition and scale. Students addressed conceptual problems that helped them develop an understanding of the power of visual images to convey ideas and expressions. (Photos by Dat Vu ’15)

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Wesleyan Employees Artwork on Display in Usdan

Several Wesleyan staff members are displaying their artwork in the Ring Family Lobby gallery this month at Usdan University Center. The show represents a small slice of creative works by Wesleyan employees.

Several Wesleyan staff members are displaying their artwork in the Ring Family Lobby gallery this month at Usdan University Center. The show represents a small slice of creative works by Wesleyan employees.

Ali McFadzen, department assistant for the Financial Aid Office, is displaying a photograph of College Row titled Campus Flare.

Ali McFadzen, department assistant for the Financial Aid Office, is displaying a photograph of South College and Memorial Chapel at sunrise titled “Campus.”

WW I Posters Shine at Davison Art Center Exhibit

dac_pr_2014-08_action_bakerdac_pr_2014-08_action_christyIt was called “the war to end all wars.” Causing the downfall of three major empires, and eclipsing all previous wars in its destruction, World War I changed the course of global history. And decades before television and sophisticated print advertising, it changed the way conflict was marketed to the American people.

A new exhibit, Call to Action: American Posters in World War I, at the Davison Art Center, displays dramatic posters that recruited soldiers, celebrated shipbuilding, called women for war work and even urged homemakers to prepare alternative foods in support of the war effort.

“The best illustrators of the day were recruited to donate their time to make these posters,” said Clare Rogan, curator of the DAC. “Artists recognized this was how they could serve. And this was the high point in American illustration, you have fabulous artists working as illustrators, and monthly periodicals are all illustrated before photography takes over in these areas.”

Telfair’s New Landscape Paintings on Exhibit in Zilkha Gallery

Tula Telfair, professor of art, will debut her newest collection of large-scale oil paintings at the Zilkha Gallery Sept. 16.

Tula Telfair, professor of art, will debut her newest collection of large-scale oil paintings at the Zilkha Gallery Sept. 16. Pictured is her painting titled “The Structured Depth of Meaning and Desire,” 2014, 72 x 100 inches.

“A World of Dreams—New Landscape Paintings” by Professor of Art Tula Telfair will be on exhibit Sept. 16 through Dec. 7 at the Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery. The exhibit’s opening reception will be held 5 to 6:30 p.m. Sept. 16 at the gallery.

“Civilization Could Not Do Without It,” 2014, 75 x 100 inches.

A World of Dreams” includes new large-scale paintings in which Telfair presents monumental landscapes and epic-scale vistas that are simultaneously awe-inspiring and intimate. She combines stillness with motion, solitude with universality, and definition with suggestion in her bold and quiet works. This is her second exhibition in the Zilkha Gallery.

All paintings are oil on canvas.

“The work for this show is entirely different. The subjects are different, the techniques are different in each painting, and from piece to piece,” she explained. “There is a lot of diversity of images in this exhibition that reflect a broad range of environments from the Antarctic to the jungles of Africa to rolling fields and soaring mountains. There are a full range of landscapes.”

Telfair’s contemporary paintings demonstrate the spirit and potency

Photography by McDonald ’88 in 2 Group Shows

Anne Arden McDonald '88

Anne Arden McDonald ’88

Photographer and sculptor Anne Arden McDonald ’88  has self portraits included in a group show, The Mind’s Eye: Sight and Insight, at the Hewitt Gallery of Art, Marymount Manhattan College (221 East 71st Street), in New York City. The show runs through December 5. The artists in this exhibition have a special relationship to their creative process both through the neurological (perception/sight) and the psychological (interpretation/insight).  Information on exhibition

Her work also appears in another group show, Mad Hatters to Pixel Pushers, at the Projective Eye Gallery of the UNC Charlotte College of Arts + Architecture, UNC Charlotte City Center, in Charlotte, NC, that runs through next week. The exhibit focuses on contemporary photographers from the southeast and beyond who use alternative processes, gelatin silver photography, digital imaging, and photo sculpture with the “constructed image. Information on exhibition

McDonald is one of the artists included in the Critical Mass top 50, a competition run by Photo Lucida.

Her work has appeared this year in the books Eyemazing: The New Collectible Art Photography (Thames and Hudson) and Jill Enfield’s Guide to Alternative Processes (Focal Press). She also was one of the 14 finalists for the Clarence John Laughlin Award, given by the New Orleans Photo Alliance.

McDonald’s web site

Untitled Self Portrait #25 by Anne McDonald

Untitled Self Portrait #25 by Anne McDonald

Cells by Anne Arden McDonald, 2007, 69 x 50 ins. silver gelatin print

Cells by Anne Arden McDonald, 2007, 69 x 50 ins. silver gelatin print

Chang ’02 Creates Art with WSJ Hedcuts, Collects White Albums

The Wall Street Journal first attempted illustrating the news using the stipple drawing known as the hedcut with news maker portrait made from a series of dots and lines that modeled on currency engravings.

Rutherford Chang ’02 now has transformed these illustrations into an art project called “The Class of 2008,” on display at the White Space Gallery in Beijing through March 18. He has reduced the Journal’s news coverage of 2008 to just the hedcuts and rearranged them, yearbook-style, in alphabetical order.

“The Class of 2008” is “typical of his past works,” according to RedBox Studio, which promotes contemporary art in China. “The painstaking and fastidious process of collecting, cutting, alphabetizing, and reorganizing is rewarded by the succinct visual observation of a specific time in our contemporary world.”

From "The Class of 2008," art work by Rutherford Chang '02

As Josh Chin recently reported in the China Real Time Report in The Wall Street Journal: “The result is a nostalgic tome that provides a stripped-down, almost abstract, view of one of the most remarkable news years in recent memory but also an illuminating window into the priorities and thought-processes of the Journal as it sought to document the year’s events.”

“The inspiration for the project, according to Mr. Chang, who splits his time between China and New York, was an Oberlin College yearbook for the Class of 1974 given to him by a friend. ‘I was impressed by how that collection of faces and names really captured that era, so I wanted to apply that to something contemporary,’ he explains.”

For this current art work, Chang extracted every hedcut he could find through the end of 2008, totally in about 4,000 ink-dot portraits. Among the leaders in appearance in a U.S. presidential election year were Barack Obama (94 times), John McCain (74), Hilary Clinton), and Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson (52).

The Journal reports: “While much of the book looks like the roster at an Ivy League secret society reunion, there are some surprising exceptions. Comedian Adam Sandler and androgynous Chinese reality star Li Yuchun make cameos, as do rapper Kanye West and Ang Lee’s The Hulk.”

Chang says: “This is a historical document of an experience we have all lived through. I want people to feel like this is their yearbook.”

Read more

Chang also spoke to WNYC 93.9 FM about his collection of more than 500 copies of The Beatles’ White Album:

Listen here

34 Students Show Art at International Photo Contest

 

Andrew Gottlieb ’14 spoke about his photo, “Break,” during the International Photo Contest reception Feb. 16 in Zelnick Pavilion. The photo contest was sponsored by the Office of International Studies and the Usdan University Center Art Committee. Gottlieb photographed the two entertainers from a Ferris wheel in front of the Jardin des Tuileries in Paris. He and 33 other Wesleyan students exhibited photos.