Tag Archive for Class of 2017

Eusebio ’17 to Study Washington’s Natural Environment as Doris Duke Conservation Scholar

Joseph Eusebio '17

Joseph Eusebio ’17 will explore themes of biodiversity, food, water and climate as a Doris Duke Conservation Scholar in Washington this summer.

Joseph Eusebio ’17 was selected to take part in the brand new Doris Duke Conservation Scholars Program at the University of Washington this summer. According to the program website, this eight-week, all-expenses-paid program will take students on a journey from the “urban jungle” to the old growth forest and back, allowing them to explore how conservation can make a difference, and how they can make a difference in conservation.

Eusebio is one of only 26 students on the team, chosen from a pool of nearly 400 applicants. He said he came across the scholarship by chance while thinking about opportunities for the summer over winter break.

“I began just looking at internships, but then I started to consider other things such as taking language courses at the University of Washington. While browsing the UW website for its summer opportunities, I happened to come across the Doris Duke Conservation Scholars link and the description just really stuck with me,” he said. “It surprised me that, as far as I can tell, I’m the only student from Washington who is a part of the program.”

However, Eusebio considered it a long shot that he would be accepted into the program, given that he has not specialized in environmental science in his coursework.

“I have, however, always had a strong attachment to nature and the outdoors,” he said.

Students Honored For Academic Achievement with Awards, Fellowships

During the Academic Scholarships, Fellowships and Prizes Reception May 7, Yan Pui "Angela" Lo '14, Julian Theseria '14 and Paul Hanakata '14 received honors. Lo received the Holzberg Fellowship and Frances M. Sheng Prize, awarded for excellence in Chinese language and excellence in Japanese language. Theseria received the Baden-Württemberg Connecticut Sister State Exchange Award and the Scott Prize for German Studies. Hanakata received the Bertman Prize.

During the Academic Scholarships, Fellowships and Prizes Reception May 7, Yan Pui “Angela” Lo ’14, Julian Theseria ’14 and Paul Hanakata ’14 received honors. Lo received the Holzberg Fellowship for psychology research and the Frances M. Sheng Prize for Japanese language. Theseria received the Baden-Württemberg Connecticut Sister State Exchange Award and the Scott Prize for German Studies. Hanakata received the Bertman Prize for physics research.

Wesleyan hosted the Academic Scholarships, Fellowships and Prizes Reception for students May 7 in Daniel family Commons.

“We gather today to honor students who represent the highest ideals of Wesleyan University―intellectual curiosity, academic excellence, creative expression, leadership, and service. While celebrating these recipients of awards, prizes, and scholarships, we also honor and thank alumni and friends whose generous contributions make these prizes possible,” said Ruth Striegel Weissman, provost and vice president for academic affairs.

The prizes and recipients are listed below:

Butterfield Prize 

Established by the Class of 1967 and awarded to the graduating senior who has exemplified those qualities of character, leadership, intellectual commitment and concern for the Wesleyan community shown by Victor Lloyd Butterfield, 11th president of the University.

Andrew Trexler ’14 

Nicole Updegrove ’14 

Rachel Sobelsohn '17, at right, was the recipient of the Susan Frazer Prize. The prize is awarded to students who have done the most distinguished work in the elementary and intermediate French language sequence.

Rachel Sobelsohn ’17, at right, was the recipient of the Susan Frazer Prize. The prize is awarded to students who have done the most distinguished work in the elementary and intermediate French language sequence.

Chadbourne Prize 

The gift of George Storrs Chadbourne, Class of 1858, to that member of the first-year class outstanding in character, conduct, and scholarship.

Ya-Lih Horng ’17 

Limbach Prize 

Established in 1966 by Russell T. Limbach, professor of art, in memory of his wife, Edna Limbach. Awarded annually to the student who has contributed the most imaginative, generous, thoughtful, and understanding social service to the people of the City of Middletown and/or the Wesleyan community.

Joshua Krugman ’14 

Catherine Marquez ’16 

Wesleyan Memorial Prize 

The gift of undergraduates in the Class of 1943 in memory of fellow students who made the supreme sacrifice in the Second World War, to the members of the junior class outstanding in qualities of character, leadership, and scholarship.

Gabriel Gordon ’15 

Christian Hosam ’15

Academic Scholarships, Fellowships, and Prizes 

Pictured are, at left, Benjamin Jacobs '14 and Benjamin Carus '14. Jacobs received the Sheng Prize, a Fulbright Fellowship and the Hallowell Prize. Carus received the Plukas Teaching Apprentice Award and White Prize. Alex Iselin '14 received the Plukas Teaching Apprentice Award, Wilde Prize and White Prize.

Pictured are, at left, Benjamin Jacobs ’14, Benjamin Carus ’14 and Alex Iselin ’14. Jacobs received the Sheng Prize, a Fulbright Fellowship and the Hallowell Prize. Carus received the Plukas Teaching Apprentice Award and White Prize. Iselin ’14 received the Plukas Teaching Apprentice Award, Wilde Prize and White Prize.

George H. Acheson and Grass Foundation Prize in Neuroscience 

Established in 1992 by a gift from the Grass Foundation, this prize is awarded to an outstanding undergraduate in the Neuroscience and Behavior Program who demonstrates excellence in the program and who also shows promise for future contributions in the field of neuroscience.

Adele Bubnys ’14 

Rachel Rosengard ’14 

Alumni Prize in the History of Art 

Established by Wesleyan alumni and awarded to a senior who has demonstrated special aptitude in the history of art and who has made a substantive contribution to the major.

Isadora Dannin ’14 

Smith ’17 to Study Arabic as a Critical Language Scholar in Oman

After participating in an intensive 10-week language institute this summer, Casey Smith '17 plans to continue studying Arabic at Wesleyan. She also hopes to earn certificates in international relations and Middle Eastern studies.

After participating in an intensive two-month language institute in Oman this summer, Casey Smith ’17 plans to continue studying Arabic at Wesleyan. She hopes to use her language skills to work with refugee populations in the future. (Photo by Olivia Drake)

Casey Smith ’17 has received a scholarship from the U.S. Department of State to study Arabic—considered a “critical needs language” by the U.S. government—in Oman this summer.

Smith, who plans to major in the College of Social Studies, was one of approximately 550 American undergraduate and graduate students to receive the Critical Language Scholarship. CLS participants will spend seven to 10 weeks in intensive language institutes in one of 13 countries. They will study critical needs languages such as Chinese, Hindi, Russian, Turkish and Urdu, among others.

Smith currently studies Arabic at Wesleyan. She began learning the language as a senior in high school, when she enrolled in a course at nearby University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

Her interest in the language was sparked by her work in high school with local refugee populations, including an internship at a refugee resettlement organization.

“Through the internship, I met a lot of people from the Middle East and North Africa. I was struck by the fact that millions of people had to flee their homes in the region, and wanted to learn more,” said Smith.

She previously had studied French in high school, but found the experience of learning Arabic to be different.

Smith's interest in Arabic was sparked by her work in high school with local refugee populations.

Smith’s interest in Arabic was sparked by her work in high school with local refugee populations.

“When you learn a Romance language, a lot of the words are similar to English, so it’s easier to pick up vocabulary. Arabic is difficult, because you don’t find many words that are familiar. The alphabet is also different, and you write from right to left,” she explained. “Once you get used to it, though, it becomes more like learning any other language.”

Smith was eager to study abroad at some point during her college career. This semester, when her Arabic professor emailed the class about the State Department’s Critical Language Scholarship, Smith saw an opportunity to study in the Middle East—a part of the world she has always wanted to visit.

According to Smith, the CLS program sends students to Morocco, Jordan and Oman to study Arabic. She was surprised to learn she would be studying in Oman.

“I didn’t know anything about Oman, really, until I started researching the places I’d be going. It got a lot more exciting because it’s so unfamiliar and different,” she said.

President Roth Speaks with Members of the Class of 2017 at Dinner

On Oct. 1, the Office of Student Affairs hosted a “First-Year Dinner with President Roth.” The event gave first-year students living in Clark Hall and Bennet Hall an opportunity to visit with President Roth, staff and their fellow residents. Students dined in the Daniel Family Commons. President Roth met with students living in the Butterfield Residences, Foss Hill, 200 Church and 156 High earlier this year.

Students also met with Dean Mike Whaley, vice president for student affairs; Dean of Students Rick Culliton, and Dean of the Class of 2017 Louise Brown.

(Photos by Hannah Norman ’16)

rothdinner1

Wesleyan Welcomes 753 Students to the Class of 2017 on Arrival Day

John Eisner and Jennifer Door White P' 17 helped move their daughter, Hannah Wolfe Eisner '17 into her new 200 Church Street residence on Arrival Day, Aug. 28. More than a dozen orientation leaders and Residential Life staff helped carry in her belongings. "We had everything in here in five minutes," John Eisner said.

John Eisner and Jennifer Door White P’ 17 helped move their daughter, Hannah Wolfe Eisner ’17 into her new 200 Church Street residence on Arrival Day, Aug. 28. More than a dozen orientation leaders and Residential Life staff helped carry in her belongings. “We had everything in here in five minutes,” John Eisner said.

Watch this video of Arrival Day:

YouTube Preview Image

(Story by Olivia Drake and Cynthia Rockwell)

After touring 12 colleges and universities, Hannah Wolfe Eisner ’17 stopped looking after visiting Wesleyan.

“I fell in love with Wesleyan on a campus tour,” Eisner said. “Wesleyan students are passionate, but they also love to share their passions with each other and interact and share ideas with one another, and that’s the educational philosophy that I was looking for in a school.”

On Aug. 28, Eisner, who hails from New York City, moved a car-load of belongings into her new home-away-from-home at the 200 Church Street student residences. Eisner was one of 753 new students welcomed to campus on new student Arrival Day. Additionally, Wesleyan is welcoming 59 transfer matriculants for the fall semester, bringing the total number of new students enrolling this fall to 812.

She brought boxes of clothes, jewelry racks, a lap top, drying rack, ironing board, mirror, fan and “too many containers.” Her parents, John Eisner and Jennifer Dorr White, helped unpack and install hooks and mirrors on the wall.

“I love this room, ” she said. “I can’t wait to meet my roommate!”

 

Hawaiian resident Rick Manayan '17 bought his first pair of winter boots in anticipation of a snowy New England winter. He moved into Clark Hall on Aug. 28 with help from his parents, Rick and Mae.

Hawaiian resident Rick Manayan ’17 bought his first pair of winter boots in anticipation of a snowy New England winter. He moved into Clark Hall on Aug. 28 with help from his parents, Rick and Mae.

At 9:45 a.m. Hawaii resident Rick Manayan ’17 said “aloha” to his new student residence in Clark Hall. After spending 13 hours in a plane and three hours in a car, he welcomed his new surroundings, even though space was tight.

“The first thing we need to do is knock down a wall and make this section bigger,” he joked to his parents, Mae and Rick.

Manayan learned about Wesleyan while attending Punahou School in Hawaii.

“I wanted to go to a small liberal arts college with people who liked things I like … dance, theater and English, and I wanted a school that offered leadership opportunities. So I chose Wesleyan,” he said.

Immediately after moving in, students took part in New Student Orientation activities including a residence hall welcome and a meet-and-greet gathering with Wesleyan President Michael Roth.

The Class of 2017 is 54 percent women and 46 percent men. Twenty-two percent of this class are New England residents, with 34 percent from the nearby mid-Atlantic states. The Midwest and South both sent Wesleyan 5 percent of the class of 2017; 21 percent call the West their home, and 13 percent arrived from outside the United States.

Eighteen percent have Wesleyan relatives, and seven percent are children of Wesleyan alumni. Thirteen percent of this Wesleyan class of 2017 are the first generation in their family to attend a four-year college. Forty-two percent of the class receives financial aid and 37 percent receive grant aid.

The class boasts strong academic high school records, with 83 percent taking a mathematics program that included calculus; a science program with biology, chemistry and physics, and four years of a foreign language. Of the 37 percent of the class reporting rank, 68 percent were in the top 10 percent of their class; 87 percent were in the top 20 percent.

More photos of Arrival Day are below. View the full Arrival Day photo gallery online here.

Amy Hood '17 received move-in help from her brother, Peter, 16. The family is from New York City.

Amy Hood ’17 received move-in help from her brother, Peter, 16. The family is from New York City.

Lili Kadets '17 of Newton, Mass., moved into Clark Hall with help from her parents Philip and Elaine. She may major in English. "I like to write, I like studio art, but I also have a mathy-sciency kind of mind." She has a twin, who is attending George Washington University.

Lili Kadets ’17 of Newton, Mass., moved into Clark Hall with help from her parents Philip and Elaine. She may major in English. “I like to write, I like studio art, but I also have a mathy-sciency kind of mind.” She has a twin, who is attending George Washington University.

Howard Matthew and Megan Norris '83, chair of the alumni association, helped their daughter, Taylor, move into her new Butterfields residence. Megan made the bed, Taylor was unpacking her clothes and Howard's job was to hang items on the walls.

Howard Matthew and Megan Norris ’83, chair of the alumni association, helped their daughter, Taylor, move into her new Butterfields residence. Megan made the bed, Taylor was unpacking her clothes and Howard’s job was to hang items on the walls.

Zachariah Ezer '17 moved into Clark Hall with help from his father Jonathan. Zachariah plays drums, piano "and a little guitar." They live in Houston, Texas.

Zachariah Ezer ’17 moved into Clark Hall with help from his father Jonathan. Zachariah plays drums, piano “and a little guitar.” They live in Houston, Texas.

Aida and Oscar Salazar  P'17 helped their daughter, Lauren '17, move into her new student residence.

Aida and Oscar Salazar P’17 helped their daughter, Lauren ’17, move into her new student residence in Bennet Hall.

Res Life staff and orientation leaders helped move students into their new home away from home.

Res Life staff and orientation leaders helped move students into their new home away from home. (Photos by Olivia Drake)

 

Class of 2017 Takes Shape as Admissions Goes Paperless

The Office of Admission is implementing a new paperless application system. The Class of 2018 will be able to apply and set up interviews online.

The Office of Admission is implementing a new paperless application system. Applicants will be able to set up interviews online.

Admissions reports that the class of 2017 is nearly fully formed, the final offers have been made and Wesleyan will welcome a class of around 750 frosh in September.

The class is more international than in previous years, with 101, or 13 percent of its students coming from outside the United States. These students are extremely well prepared academically for college and an open curriculum: more of its members took calculus, at least four years of a foreign language and biology, chemistry and physics in high school than the previous admitted class.

“We’re pretty excited about this, and have a good idea about what the class looks like, although it’s not completely final,” said Dean of Admission and Financial Aid Nancy Hargrave Meislahn. The admitted class shrinks or in admission parlance “melts” a little during the summer, but usually only by seven to 10 students, she explained.

The exciting sub-plot this year is the debut of paperless admissions. The class of 2018 will be chosen from applicants who apply, submit references and transcripts – and even set up interview appointments – online.

“We’re going great guns,” said Meislahn. “We’re going to start using the new system, called SLATE by Technolutions, to read applications on line, and the first module that we’re rolling out will book our interviews.”  Charlotte Lazor, Greg Pyke and Dan Manuyag are the leaders of the effort and deserve all the credit for keeping implementation on schedule and everyone on task.  By the end of the summer, no stone will be left untouched and all staff engaged in the transition.

And if an applicant goes old-school and submits material on dead trees?

“We’ll scan the materials,” Meislahn said. “We’ll keep some version of paper around for the next several years. But there will be much less of it. We might consider a yard sale for our file cabinets.”

Admitted Students, Families Celebrate All Things Wesleyan at WesFest 2013 (with Photo Gallery, Video)

James Kellner of Verona, N.J. attended WesFest with his mother, Michele Kellner, and grandmother, Maria Montoto.

James Kellner of Verona, N.J. attended WesFest with his mother, Michele Kellner, and grandmother, Maria Montoto.

More than 500 admitted students and their families descended on Wesleyan’s campus for WesFest, the annual celebration of all things Wesleyan. Between Wednesday, April 17 and Friday, April 19, they were treated to dozens of tours, panels, lectures and demonstrations to acquaint them with Wesleyan’s academics, student organizations, athletics and facilities.

On Friday around noon, the sun came out and visitors took a break to enjoy a barbecue lunch on Foss Hill while a student band played.

Admitted student Cloie Logan of Albuquerque, N.M. visited Wesleyan with her parents, Nina Logan and Jimmy Miranda.

Admitted student Cloie Logan of Albuquerque, N.M. visited Wesleyan with her parents, Nina Logan and Jimmy Miranda. (Photos by Olivia Drake)

Cloie Logan and her parents came all the way from Albuquerque, N.M. Cloie fell in love with Wesleyan after visiting as a high school junior, and was accepted early decision I.

“Basically since December, I’ve been aching to be here,” she said. At WesFest, she said, “I ate a lot of really delicious food, went to a comedy show, saw Prometheus, went to a few department office hours, and visited the Argus,” where she hopes to work as a student.

James Kellner of Verona, N.J. also was admitted early decision. He visited Wesleyan with his mother and grandmother, and met with the coach of the wrestling team, which he plans to join. He plans to study economics.

“I like it a lot. I like the people, the diversity,” he said. “Just the vibe here—it’s relaxed and easygoing.”

Accompanied by her parents and younger sister, Anne Chen of New York City had heard President Michael Roth speak earlier in the day, and took a tour. Her initial impressions of Wesleyan: “It’s really friendly and open. It’s a really supportive community. People seem really creative.”

Malaysia Johnson of Prince Frederick, M.D. visited with her mother and grandmother. After attending a student-to-student panel, she said, “I was impressed with how active the students at Wesleyan are with volunteering and things like that.”

Malaysia Johnson of Prince Frederick, M.D. attended a student-to-student panel and was impressed by how active Wesleyan students are in community service. She is pictured with her mother, Glenda Johnson, and her grandmother, Delois Johnson.

Malaysia Johnson of Prince Frederick, M.D. attended a student-to-student panel and was impressed by how active Wesleyan students are in community service. She is pictured with her mother, Glenda Johnson, and her grandmother, Delois Johnson.

Jackson Dumont of Albany, N.Y. attended a class on astronomy, which he found, “really interesting.”

“I like all the different academic opportunities available to me at Wesleyan,” he said.

Lucy Salwen of Amherst, Mass. visited with her mother. She sat in on an environmental science class, stayed overnight with a current student host, saw a performance by Prometheus—“That was really cool. A little scary.”—and attended a co-ed ultimate Frisbee team practice.

“I’ve been walking around campus and seeing the same faces again. It seems like a nice size,” she said.

VIDEOS and PHOTOS of the event are below. View the complete WesFest photo gallery on the Wesleyan Flickr page