Tag Archive for Class of 2019

Chitena ’19 Receives Davis Projects for Peace Grant to Teach Programming in Zimbabwe

Alvin Chitena ’19 at North College. (Photo by Olivia Drake)

Alvin Chitena ’19, pictured here at North College on April 22, grew up in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe and worked with computers from the age of eight. He took his first computer class at Wesleyan. (Photo by Olivia Drake)

Alvin Chitena ’19 has been awarded a Davis Projects for Peace grant of $10,000 to launch his project Zim Code at five high schools in Zimbabwe this summer. Zim Code provides Zimbabwean youth with free access to resources they need—computers, internet access and instruction—to learn computer programming and how to apply their new skills in their community.

Davis Projects for Peace was created in 2007 through the generosity of Kathryn W. Davis, a lifelong internationalist and philanthropist who died in 2013. It supports initiative, innovation and entrepreneurship by undergraduate students focused on conflict prevention, resolution or reconciliation in countries around the world.

2016 Patricelli Center Seed Grant Winners Announced

Members of team behind TRAP House, one of the three social ventures that won a seed grant, presented their pitch before a live audience of the Board of Trustees, Patricelli Center Advisory Board and others. Presenting (from left to right) are Irvine Peck's-Agaya '18, Gabe Weinreb '18, Bashaun Brown, and Sara Eismont '18.

Members of the team behind TRAP House, one of the three social ventures awarded a seed grant, presented their pitch before members of the Board of Trustees, Patricelli Center Advisory Board and others. Presenting (from left to right) are Irvine Peck’s-Agaya ’18, Gabe Weinreb ’18, Bashaun Brown and Sara Eismont ’18.

Three social ventures started by Wesleyan students were recently awarded $5,000 seed grants in the Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship’s annual Seed Grant Challenge. They are Kindergarten Kickstart, TRAP House and Walking Elephants Home.

The last weekend in February, all six finalists for the seed grants presented pitches for their ventures before the Board of Trustees, Patricelli Center Advisory Board and Seed Grant judges, as well as representatives of CT Innovations and the ‎State of Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development, fellow students, and others. The event was also livestreamed. One of the other finalists, <Zim/Code>, chose to withdraw from the Seed Grant competition before selections were made, after the project received $10,000 from another funder.

The remaining finalists, Give Education and Pertiwi Initiative, were awarded smaller runner-up grants funded by members of the Board of Trustees who attended the pitches and believed all six teams were worthy of validation.

“This was the third year that we awarded seed grants in a pitch competition format,” said Makaela Kingsley, director of the Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship. “I am always blown away by the finalists, and this year was no exception. From Becca Winkler’s thorough understanding of the environmental and cultural conditions in northern Thailand to Irvine Peck’s-Agaya’s deep personal commitment to her economic development work, every person who took that stage captured the audience’s attention and garnered their support. More than launching ventures, this process helps students develop creative competence and confidence that will make them effective changemakers and capable leaders. I believe it’s a critical piece of a Wesleyan education.”

President Roth Speaks to Families, Students on Arrival Day

President Michael Roth spoke to families in Memorial Chapel on Arrival Day, Sept. 2. He urged students to explore parts of the curriculum beyond their comfort zone and to discover what they love to do, get better at it, and share it with others.

“It’s an extraordinarily exciting time to be starting at Wesleyan,” he said. “There are tremendous resources across this place; there are people with extraordinary ideas.… Students should find the people from whom they can learn most deeply.”

Watch his remarks, which appeared on The Huffington Post homepage, below:

Faculty Hold Advising Appointments with Class of 2019 Students

On Sept. 3, Class of 2019 students met with their faculty advisor to discuss their fall semester pre-registration enrollments and educational goals. The individual faculty advising appointments are part of New Student Orientation for the Class of 2019. (Photos by Olivia Drake and Laurie Kenney)

Khachig Tölölyan, director of the College of Letters, professor of letters, professor of English, met with John Cote ’19.

Khachig Tölölyan, director of the College of Letters, professor of letters, professor of English, met with John Cote ’19.

Courtney Weiss Smith, assistant professor of English, met with Catherine Albert ’19.

Courtney Weiss Smith, assistant professor of English, met with Catherine Albert ’19.

Diversity and Talents of the Class of 2019

The Class of 2019 gathered for the traditional panoramic class photo Sept. 2.

The Class of 2019 gathered for the traditional panoramic class photo Sept. 2. (Photo by Rick Culliton)

On Sept. 3, Meg Harrop '19 met with her academic advisor, Professor of Economics Richard Grossman, to discuss her fall semester pre-registaton enrollments and educational goals. The individual faculty advising appointments are part of New Student Orientation for the Class of 2019. 

On Sept. 3, Meg Harrop ’19 met with her academic advisor, Professor of Economics Richard Grossman, to discuss her fall semester pre-registaton enrollments and educational goals. The individual faculty advising appointments are part of New Student Orientation for the Class of 2019. (Photo by Olivia Drake)

By 9 a.m. Sept. 2, vehicles brimming with backpacks, boxes, books, bedding, microwaves, clothes, laptops, lamps and dorm decor descended on Andrus Field. Members of the Class of 2019, with help from their families and fellow students, moved into their student residences and immediately began New Student Orientation (See photos and a video of Arrival Day here).

Meg Harrop ’19, who is on the women’s soccer team, said her transition to Wesleyan has been “incredibly welcoming, smooth and comfortable.”

“There are only about nine other students in my hall, but everyone has such different backgrounds and interests, and the orientation activities helped me learn something new and meaningful about each of them,” she said. “Everyone is excited to get to know each other, so everyone seemed comfortable approaching new people and knocking on other hall mates’ doors. I can’t wait to meet new people in my classes and get to know my professors!”

Students in the Class of 2019 were selected from some of the toughest competition the Office of Admission has ever seen.

“Our new students are superbly prepared—by traditional academic measures as good as it gets. And, particularly well prepared to work across the entire curriculum of arts and sciences,” said Nancy Hargrave Meislahn, dean of admission and financial aid. “The range of talents, cultures, family backgrounds in this group is remarkable. In many ways, this may be the most diverse class ever enrolled at Wes—and that’s saying something!”

Members of the Class of 2019 moved into their student residences on Sept. 2.

Members of the Class of 2019 moved into their student residences on Sept. 2. (Photo by John Van Vlack)

In 2014-2015, Wesleyan received 9,905 applicants for first-year fall admission into the Class of 2019. Of those, 2,181 were admitted and 758 expected to matriculate.

The Class of 2019 is 44 percent male and 56 percent female. International students make up 11 percent of the entire class and come from more than 40 countries including Brazil, Cuba, Ethiopia, Nepal, Zimbabwe and the United Arab Emirates. More than 100 students reside outside the U.S., and 80 are citizens of other countries.

Forty-two percent of the students (including international) are self-identifying students of color, the highest percentage in at least five years.

“This is as cosmopolitan and international a class as Wesleyan has seen,” Meislahn said.

Seventeen percent of the Class of 2019 are first-generation college students. Thirteen percent have a Wesleyan alumnus/ae or student relative.

The Class of 2019’s top projected majors are economics, biology, psychology, film studies and English while 13 percent are undecided.

Fifty-one percent of the class is receiving financial aid.

“We think we’ve assembled a remarkably engaged and talented group of new students—the next generation who are committed to making a difference wherever in the world they are, here at Wesleyan or beyond the university,” Meislahn said. “The variety of talents and commitments to school groups, civic and religious organizations, politics and the arts that these students bring bodes well for the life of this vibrant community called Wesleyan.

 

More than 800 Students Move in on Arrival Day

Hundreds of families and friends helped students move into their student residences on Arrival Day Sept. 2.

Hundreds of families and friends helped students move into their student residences on Arrival Day Sept. 2.

Wesleyan welcomed more than 800 new, transfer, visiting, international and exchange students to campus during Arrival Day activities Sept. 2. Several Wesleyan student-athletes, staff and faculty helped the new students and their families carry their belongings into the student residences.

Zenola Harper P’19 helped her son, Salim ’19,  move into his Clark Hall residence home. (Photo by Olivia Drake)

Zenola Harper P’19 helped her son, Salim ’19, move into his Clark Hall residence home. (Photos by Olivia Drake)

Allen and Zenola Harper P’19 of Westchester, N.Y. borrowed a friend’s SUV to haul their son’s belongings to campus. Salim ’19, a basketball player, brought along a rug, microwave, laundry soap, printer, athletic apparel, a box of brownies, but most importantly his shoe collection.

“I can’t believe how many shoes he has,” Zenola said, looking over a heap of unpacked boxes, bins and bags. “Look at all this stuff. Does he need all those shoes?”

Angel Martin ’19 of Brooklyn, Conn. looked at colleges in the Washington D.C. area, but ultimately decided Wesleyan’s close proximity to home and the university’s course offerings appealed most to her.

“I love how progressive Wesleyan is, and I already know that I want to double major in feminist, gender and sexuality studies and government, and focus on international politics,” she said.

Martin, with help from her brother, parents and student-athletes,

Wimer ’19 Raises $2,175 in “Swim for Nepal” Fundraising Event

On May 29, pre-frosh Max Wimer ’19 swam laps for 60 minutes to raise money for children affected by the April 25 Nepal magnitude-7.8 earthquake that killed more than 8,000 people and injured an additional 23,000. The event, titled “Swim for Nepal,” was part of the Save the Children Fund non-profit group that promotes children’s rights, provides relief and helps support children in developing countries. More than $37,000 was donated, with Wimer as one of the fundraisers, collecting $2,175.

This is not the first charity event for Wimer, who organized and swam in the 2013 “Swim for the Philippines” event. On Oct. 15, 2013, a magnitude-7.2 earthquake struck the Philippines, and relief efforts were disrupted three weeks later by Super Typhoon Haiyan. This event raised more than $43,000 for children afflicted by these two events.

Read more about the charity event here.

Wesleyan Welcomes Second Cohort of Posse Veteran Scholars

The newly accepted class of Posse Veteran Scholars, holding Wesleyan shirts, together with some current Posse scholars. Also shown are Andy Szegedy-Maszak, faculty mentor of the Class of 2018 Posse scholars, and Jane A. Seney Professor of Greek; John Gudvangen, associate dean of admission and financial aid/director of financial aid; and Antonio Farias, vice president for equity and inclusion/ Title IX officer.

Pictured are the newly accepted Class of 2019 Posse Veteran Scholars, holding Wesleyan shirts, together with some current Posse scholars from the Class of 2018. Also shown are, second from left, Andy Szegedy-Maszak, faculty mentor of the Class of 2018 Posse scholars, and Jane A. Seney Professor of Greek; fifth from left, John Gudvangen, associate dean of admission and financial aid/director of financial aid; and, far right, Antonio Farias, vice president for equity and inclusion/ Title IX officer.

Wesleyan has accepted a second cohort of Posse Foundation Veteran Scholars into the Class of 2019. The group, which includes three women and seven men, come from all over the United States, and have served in Afghanistan, Iraq, Bosnia, Italy, South Korea and Germany. Seven served in the Army, one in the Marine Corps, one in the Air Force, and one in the Connecticut Army National Guard.

The group’s faculty mentor will be Giulio Gallarotti, professor of government, professor of environmental studies, tutor in the College of Social Studies.

In 2013, Wesleyan became only the second institution, after Vassar, to partner with the Posse Foundation in a new program to recruit veterans to top-tier colleges and universities, where they receive full scholarships. Read more about the partnership in this story. The first “posse” of students entered Wesleyan in fall 2014. Meet them here.

“Our second Posse Vets cohort brings an even more diverse and eclectic group of veterans to Wesleyan,” said Antonio Farias, vice president for equity and inclusion/ Title IX officer. “What continues to impress me is the unshakeable confidence that is backed by academic rigor and a deep sense of duty each of the vets brings to their educational journey.”

The first group of Posse vets “have set a high bar in terms of academic performance and community engagement, so we’re looking forward to welcoming the next cohort and watching them thrive,” he said.

Farias added that he’s grateful to the faculty who have volunteered to serve as mentors to these students, as well as the tireless staff that help ensure the transition from the military to a liberal arts college is successful.

“We’re thrilled that Giulio Gallarotti has been selected as the faculty mentor. Giulio brings a deep empathetic understanding of how to integrate and help different types of students excel at Wes, which makes him an ideal mentor.”