Tag Archive for Class of 2019

Members of the Class of 2019 Inducted into Phi Beta Kappa

PBK

On May 25, members of the Class of 2019 were inducted into Wesleyan’s Gamma Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa Society, the oldest national scholastic honor society. The Wesleyan Gamma Chapter was organized in 1845 and is the ninth-oldest chapter in the country.

To be elected, a student must first have been nominated by the department of his or her major. The student also must have demonstrated curricular breadth by having met the General Education Expectations and must have achieved a GPA of 93 and above.

Phi Beta Kappa is the oldest surviving Greek letter society in America, founded in December 1776 by five students who attended the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. The emblem contains the three Greek letters “Phi-Beta-Kappa,” which are the initials of the Greek motto, Philosophia Biou Kybernetes. This essentially means “the love of wisdom is the guide of life.”

The spring 2019 inductees are:

Caroline Adams
Yulia Alexandr
Erin Angell
William Bellamy
Cara Bendich
Zachary Bennett
Chiara Bercu
Sophie Brett-Chin
Nicholas Byers
David Cabanero
Talia Cohen
John Cote 

Wesleyan in the News

NewsIn this recurring feature in The Wesleyan Connection, we highlight some of the latest news stories about Wesleyan and our alumni.

Wesleyan in the News

1. The Morning Call: “Allen Student Wins ‘Hamilton’ Scholarship, Congrats from Lin-Manuel Miranda”

Anna Tjeltveit of Allentown, Penn., winner of the 2019 Wesleyan University Hamilton Prize for Creativity, is profiled. She shares how her winning submission, a one-act play titled, “Five Steps,” came together at the last minute, and discusses her early career in theater as well as her plans for her time at Wesleyan.

2. WJLA: “Arlington Teen Wins ‘Hamilton’ Prize Gets a Shout Out from Lin-Manuel Miranda”

Cole Goco of Arlington, Va., who received an honorable mention in the 2019 Wesleyan University Hamilton Prize for Creativity, is interviewed. He discusses his years-long work on his winning web comic strip, “Billy the Pop,” and what it felt like to have Lin-Manuel Miranda ’02 congratulate him by name on Twitter.

Scholarship Supports Graduate Study at Oxford for Mundangepfupfu ’19

Keith Mundangepfupfu '19

Keith Mundangepfupfu ’19

Zimbabwe native Keith Mundangepfupfu ’19, a College of Social Studies major and African studies minor, is the recipient of a scholarship through the Oxford-Weidenfeld and Hoffmann Scholarships and Leadership Programme.

The scholarship will fund full course fees and living costs at St. Antony’s College at Oxford.

The Weidenfeld-Hoffmann Scholarship supports “leaders of tomorrow by providing outstanding university graduates and young professionals from developing countries and emerging economies with the opportunity to pursue fully-funded graduate studies, combined with a specially created program of leadership development, long-term mentoring and networking.”

At St. Antony’s, Mundangepfupfu will pursue a Master of Science in migration studies, focusing on the immigration of Zimbabweans to South Africa and how they interact with the law, specifically LGBTQ+ Zimbabwean immigrants. 

Wesleyan Awards 763 BA Degrees at 187th Commencement


Graduates, their families, and other members of the Wesleyan community gathered on Andrus Field for the 187th Commencement ceremony on warm, sunny Sunday, May 26. Wesleyan conferred 763 bachelor of arts degrees; 44 master of arts degrees; 22 master of arts in liberal studies degrees; and 11 doctor of philosophy degrees. (Watch the entire Commencement ceremony online here.)

Saidiya Hartman ’84, professor of English and comparative literature and women’s and gender studies at Columbia University, delivered the Commencement address

Senior Voices: Tostado, Young, Erodici Reflect on Their Years at Wes

Vanessa Tostado Senior Voices

“Senior Voices” was held at Memorial Chapel on May 25.

As part of the 2019 Commencement weekend festivities, graduating seniors reflected on their unique and transformative Wesleyan experiences during the “Senior Voices” event held May 25 in Memorial Chapel. In addition to the speeches, this year’s event also included a farewell song, “Irish Friendship Wish,” performed by Maria Rodriguez-Castro ’19, Joy Adedokun ’19, and Olivia Backal-Balik ’20.

Seniors Vanessa Tostado, Kati Young, and Matthew Erodici spoke of the changes they had undergone during their years at Wesleyan and the community and support that they found while here. Associate Professor of American Studies and Anthropology Margot Weiss provided the faculty address, encouraging students to embrace “growth that takes unexpected and novel forms, that moves and spreads . . . unpredictable, unruly, creative.”

Below are the speakers’ remarks as prepared:

Vanessa Tostado

Vanessa Tostado ’19

Vanessa Tostado ’19

I would like to begin by sharing part of a reflection piece I wrote in 2015 before coming to Wesleyan: The transition couldn’t come sooner. The pressure is on, the time to reflect and panic is now. My high school, I feel, has prepared me for the rigors of college work. Now that I will begin a new chapter in my life, I hope that college pushes me beyond the boundaries that I have surrounded myself with. I can’t wait to see the new person that I become. Four years later, today, I stand before you in a similar position: The pressure is still on, I’m still panicking, and tomorrow, I will begin a new chapter in my life. It seems like nothing has changed, but in reality, everything has changed.

My freshman year routine at Wesleyan was the following: eat, code, gym, get eight hours of sleep, repeat. Really, had you met me freshman year you wouldn’t say I’m exaggerating. I was a straight arrow with tunnel vision going towards my target. Now, I’m not a physics major, but I know that an object in motion stays in motion with the same speed and same direction unless acted upon by an unbalanced force.

Well, I’ve had my fair share of unbalanced forces. Somewhere along my four years at Wesleyan, my friends, family, traditions, and God changed the trajectory of my life. I struggled to let go of my routine—I didn’t know how. More importantly, I was afraid of the potential chaos. But I always knew something was missing; I didn’t feel like this was the time of my life, like so many people suggested it would be. Then one day, a friend said, “Educating the mind without educating the heart is no education at all.” That’s when I realized what had to change.

By sophomore year I was spending more time with friends outside of the library; I started attending mass and I even went on a spring break trip to the Bahamas. Junior year I went abroad to Hungary. Despite being anxious about not fitting in, my friends and mentors assured me it would be an unforgettable experience. And it was. During my last year at Wesleyan, I learned to ski, not black diamond or anything. On multiple occasions, I stayed up until 2 a.m. with my friends, not because we were studying, but because we were having fun. I took a step forward in my faith and was confirmed with my best friend as my godmother.

Without realizing it, I was slowly letting experiences outside of academia and other people enter my rigid routine. By educating my mind and my heart, my achievements reached horizons I didn’t think were possible. In fact, I wouldn’t have had the courage to come up here and share my story with you all, if it weren’t for the individuals on this campus that I’ve come to call close friends.

Tomorrow, I will begin a new chapter, a new adventure, only this time, I’m open to all of life’s unbalanced forces. Thank you.

Kati Young '19

Kati Young ’19

Kati Young ’19

You know what they say—timing is everything. As I’ve reflected on my experience these last four years, I’ve realized that this saying has truth to it—so much of my growth has happened because of experiencing two things at once, and discovering how the two interacted with and challenged one other. I’ve experienced this type of change socially, academically, and personally.

During my freshman fall, I was recovering from extensive bullying at my public high school, all the while forming my first lifelong Wesleyan friendships with my “freshman pack.” While I had learned in high school that I deserved to be ostracized, in college I was discovering what it meant to have friends who valued what I had to say and who actually showed up to support me.

During my sophomore fall, I still remember the gloomy, rainy Tuesday when our current [U.S.] president was elected. I felt overwhelmed by so many worldwide or national problems. But working with then-senior Leah Cabrera [’17], we responded by focusing on how we could change our direct community. Even Wesleyan felt too big—so we channeled our focus on just Division III: Natural Sciences and Mathematics. By forming the NSM Coalition, I learned the ups and downs and long hours it took to fight for inches of tangible change towards a more inclusive STEM community. So even though I felt hopeless about large-scale issues, I began to feel inspired by local-scale action.

During my junior fall, I was surrounded by people who loved me, enrolled in classes I was interested in, and involved with clubs I found meaningful. But it was during this season that I also struggled with severe health challenges. I found incredible strength through my Christian faith, where I read from the Holy Bible the words of Paul, “I know what it is to be in need, and I know what it is to have plenty. I have learned the secret of being content in any and every situation, whether well fed or hungry, whether living in plenty or in want. I can do all this through him who gives me strength” (Philippians 4:12–13).

During my medical leave, I could no longer prove my worth by As or by a laundry list of leadership positions. Who was I if I was no longer a Wesleyan student? Who was I if I was no longer a successful student? In the months of recovery, I had to find value in being myself, not in doing. This meant reconnecting with the core of my Christian faith, redefining my values, and finding a new kind of balance. I at last prioritized my health—emotional, physical, spiritual.

Balance and timing—that’s what I’m taking away as a Wesleyan graduate. Learning how to balance two significant ideas—whether it’s being treated different socially, taking classes that interplay with each other in unique ways, finding what type of change-making moves me, or somehow finding gratitude whilst struggling with illness—these are all part of my journey. And I ask all of us here tonight to embrace this appreciation of timing, to strive towards balance, but mostly, to love ourselves so we can love others.

Matthew Erodici '19

Matthew Erodici ’19

Matthew Erodici ’19

As I look back on my four years at Wesleyan, I am amazed by how much I have changed—in no small part due to the incredible people I have met. Not only have I gained self-confidence and compassion through lifelong friends, but also practical thinking and independence through impactful mentors. Through a marathon of academic challenges and chemistry research, my measurement of success has shifted more and more away from letters and numbers (albeit still important) toward being able to apply knowledge and teach others freely. Some of my most fulfilling academic moments have come while working as a peer tutor or collaborating on problem sets—witnessing others have that “a-ha” moment or breakthrough on a concept. Furthermore, as a tutoring group co-leader and ultimate frisbee captain, I have come to know both the difficulties and joys of making an organization or team function together—and the importance of having spaces away from class to decompress and cultivate my other passions.

Through all of these experiences, I emerge with a stronger conviction than ever that none of it would have been possible without my sources of inspiration—namely, my parents, my close friends, and my faith. These past four years, while being a period of immense growth, have not come without their extreme hardships. Finding a way into graduate school did not happen without dedicating long nights to writing lab reports, studying chemical reactions for exams, and parsing academic articles for independent research. I credit all my success to my parents, whose never-ending love, support, and encouragement have been the engine behind my work and the catalyst behind some of the biggest risks I have taken—such as committing to a senior thesis and applying to a PhD program. Moreover, getting through some of my toughest weeks at Wesleyan—such as coming back to projects and tests after a full weekend at a frisbee tournament—could not have happened without friends who constantly had my back, checked in with me, and provided good laughs over late-night meals. In addition, my Catholic faith—and the Catholic community at Wesleyan—have never failed to be a source of strength, love, healing, and wisdom—particularly when life seemed overwhelming or my mind had trouble decluttering. In short, all of these people have lifted me to the achievements I take pride in today, and their unwavering support will continue to push me beyond Wesleyan. I want to extend a heartfelt congratulations to the rest of the Class of 2019 and, especially, to their pillars of support along the way.

Margot Weiss

Associate Professor of American Studies and Anthropology Margot Weiss

Margot Weiss, associate professor and chair of anthropology; associate professor of American Studies; and associate professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

“A Queer Baccalaureate”

I want to start by thanking you so much for inviting me to join you in this celebration—I know this part, tonight, is just for you, and I am honored to be the faculty voice you’ve invited to this event. I am standing here now at the end of my 10th year of teaching at Wesleyan. I have only been at this particular podium twice before: once to introduce Judith Butler back in 2013, and once to interview Chelsea Manning in 2017. For this queer academic these were life highlights—but this honor tops them both.

Tomorrow is it, right? Except of course, it isn’t really. As I thought about what words to share with you, I thought about the words I’d most have wanted to hear, way back in 1995, when I found myself graduating from college with no idea what I would do next. And so this is for any of you who feel as uncertain, ambivalent, and anxious as I did—proud of all that you’ve accomplished but also certain that it isn’t enough. Those of you who feel a little ragged, and not so perfectly formed and directed.

When I taught at Duke University, the students there talked about the pressure to achieve what they called “effortless perfection”—to be academically successful, socially poised, properly gendered, practically perfect in every way, but with no visible effort, no sweat on the brow. I think those students are a little more polished and shiny and suited up for business school than you all are, but still, that effortlessness and that perfection, both, might not be entirely foreign. And that’s a lot.

Tonight is the night before your commencement, your graduation. Both words pointing to a precipice that you are standing on, about to jump, or be shoved off. Graduation marks the end—the end of your time at Wesleyan, in college, the end of the before you go out there and join the “real world.” Commencement marks the beginning—the beginning of your real life, your future you, the start of what you were meant to do and be. And that, too, is a lot.

So I thought I would speak to you a bit about uncertainty and ambivalence, about not knowing and not being sure, about something queer theorist and anthropologist Martin Manalansan calls “queer mess,” which we might oppose to that effortless perfection and bright, shining certainty. And I thought I might speak, too, against the press of straight time, a time that forces you into clean endings and brisk beginnings—and instead wallow a bit in the queer and messy middle, in the sideways and the now, where we might find ourselves together, asking, thinking, dreaming.

  1. So first, Queer Failure

In The Queer Art of Failure, his ode to the minor, the low, and the childish, Jack Halberstam celebrates “ways of being and knowing that stand outside conventional understandings of success,” measured by “reproductive maturity combined with wealth accumulation.” This is the thrust of straight time in our heteronormative, capitalist society: from A to B to C; working your way up the corporate ladder; and the marriage plot, from meet-cute to side-by-side graves. What would it mean, he asks, to turn away from these logics and instead celebrate “failing, losing, forgetting, unmaking, undoing, unbecoming, [and] not knowing”? Might failure allow us to escape the punishing norms that discipline and manage our lives “with the goal of delivering us from unruly childhoods into orderly and predictable adulthoods”?

I don’t think I knew how to celebrate failure when I graduated from college. I know I felt uncertain: I thought that I wanted to become an academic, but I wasn’t sure; I knew I didn’t want to return home to the suburbs of Connecticut and join my father’s business. A year before I graduated, I had gone to the career center at the University of Chicago. I still remember sitting across the desk from the career counselor as she said to me, “Well, it’s not enough just to be good at school—in order to become a successful academic, you need to be able to create new knowledge; you need to have a unique point of view.” I was 20 years old. No one in my family had a PhD. I didn’t know if I could “make new knowledge.”

I recently read an essay about the plight of unemployed PhD students called “What Happens After You’ve Gotten All the As.” There you are, the author writes, a good student, a success. But after all the achievements, after you finish everything on the syllabus, after you’ve gotten all the As, you look up and you wonder, how do I cultivate a sense of worth when the rubric “by which you have always been able to measure and confirm your self value has suddenly…been taken away?”

Her answer is to slow down, to take time, to look inside, and, most of all, to risk failing. To risk failing at what binds and controls you, not what helps you thrive. To fail queerly is to succeed otherwise: not through rigid metrics and standards, but through other paths—winding, overgrown, circular, even—that you make for yourself.

I wish that I had said to that career counselor that I probably did not have a unique point of view, since knowledge is made with others—collaboratively, collectively. I think of what Fred Moten and Stefano Harney call “study,” an unregulated, unprofessional thinking with others. In their celebration of the subversive intellectual and the renegade thinker, they turn away from excellence, productivity, and rigor; from forms of professionalization that glide along tracks already laid down, that serve institutions, not us. Study isn’t disciplined, or ready-made, they write, it “is what you do with other people. It’s talking and walking,” it is speculative, “playing in a band,” or “old men sitting on a porch, or people working together in a factory.” They urge us to treat theory as a toy box, a playground; to build places to think together; for study, as the live shape of thought, can create new relations and new ideas, ideas that might serve us, not our credentials. This matters more than individualized “success.”

In the four years that you have been at Wesleyan, you have learned so much. You have mastered courses, topics, certificates, theories. There is so much that you know. But more importantly, you have learned how to learn, how to ask and puzzle, how to reflect and worry over problems that don’t have an easy solution. How to study—in an emancipatory way—how to think with others, which is not the same as the thinking required to get that A. So tonight I first want to celebrate not only what you know, but also what you don’t know, what you are uncertain about. To celebrate not so much the bright moments of your successes, measured by the already-formed, the already-known, but also the moments of your failures: the places of imperfection, times where you risk thinking aloud, moments where your thought with others builds worlds. To celebrate you learning how to build sandcastles with others—studying, asking, wondering.

  1. Growing Sideways

Well, not to give the ending away, but I did end up becoming an academic. And I ended up back in Connecticut, too—much to my surprise and, to be frank, dismay. As some of you know, I grew up nearby, and, as a young queer angry punk rock teenager I was desperate to leave the closure of the suburbs, the relentlessly heteronormative and stifling spaces in which I’d grown up. My version of the good life was forged in the 80s, and so I imagined my future in the city where I would wear heavily shoulder-padded suit jackets and sneakers as I raced to the office from the subway. (If you have no idea what I am talking about, see the movie 9 to 5.)

As soon as I graduated from high school I went away, as far as I could get—Chicago, and then, San Francisco, Oakland, Boston, New York, Durham. I never thought that I would return to Connecticut; I never wanted to. But then, after four years of precarious employment on temporary contracts, I got the call that offered me this job, a wonderful job, one of the best—I mean, they wanted to hire a queer anthropologist!—and so I came back.

And as I looked around, I was surprised to feel a new appreciation for things I had, it turned out, been missing all those years: the four full seasons, the ice storms, the farm stands, the broad central Connecticut accent. I built a new life here, in the ruins of the old, a life that—sometimes, at least, when the light catches it just right, feels open, and full of possibility—not the suffocating one I had fled, but a rich and sustaining one. It doesn’t always feel that way, to be sure, and I still hate the suburbs. But I know this place differently now, and I know myself differently now. I am not so much back here as still here or here anew.

I don’t mean this as an ode to Connecticut; many of you, I know, can’t wait to leave this little state, and I get why! I mean it as an ode to unexpected turns; paths we didn’t predict and couldn’t know. It is my own belated realization of the value of, as Donna Haraway puts it, staying with the trouble, rather than trying to find a way out or up or over it. What if the possibility of the good life isn’t over there, out there, but here, with us, already?

With us already because we don’t grow up, we grow sideways. Kathryn Bond Stockton talks this way about a queer movement that is lateral, about width and depth, rather than a unidirectional height. Growing sideways is expansive, incorporative, it refuses neat phases and stages of growth marked by beginnings and endings, in favor of lingering, sliding, lengthening, suspending. Growing sideways stretches toward the horizontal not the vertical, it is connective and comradely, rather than hierarchical and discrete.

As you ready yourself to leave Wesleyan, as you stretch that piece of packing tape over the last box, I don’t think that you are sealing off your past and starting a whole new future. What I take from Stockton is that we don’t have to grow “up” when we can, instead, grow sideways. Hold on to the connections to your friends, your lovers, your exes, the expansive communities you have made here. And know that you can’t predict the form your life will take, the circles and squiggles that make a life—a real life, not one that is ready-made, pre-ordered and focus-group tested. Growing sideways is growth that takes unexpected and novel forms, that moves and spreads. It is unpredictable, unruly, creative—it is your life, your real one, and you are already living it.

  1. And finally, Queer Mess

Maybe you haven’t quite finished packing up your room, and it is at the point now when everything—all the flotsam and jetsam of your life—is spewed all over the floor, on the bed, and hanging from the lampshades. Maybe you are here tonight seeking a brief respite from the mess, what is unfinished, what has yet to be neatly pressed and put away, stored for another day.

Martin Manalansan writes about the wild success of home improvement and make-over shows, picking especially at Marie Kondo’s “tidying up.” “I love mess,” Kondo says, but Manalansan points out that of course she really doesn’t seem to—instead, it seems like she hates mess, and everything else that is “matter out of place,” as Mary Douglas had it long ago: matter that disrupts, clogs, clutters, spoils, bogs down, rumples. Against mastery and control, against perfection and poise, Manalansan celebrates queer mess, that which “messes up” the pristine order of things, “the neat normative configurations and patterns that seek to calcify lives and experiences” into rigid, acceptable forms.

Against a smooth and shiny surface, mess is unfinished, raw—tangled, wayward, untidy. But it is also the raw material for a life lived otherwise. And as such it is hopeful: it doesn’t wait for the world we want or a better, perfect version of us—it makes do and makes the most of the ragged connections and jagged edges of our real lives today. What if we embrace the disorder, the clutter, and the chaos, and resist the “cleaning up” function of the normative? What if we live in the muck, the mess, without “preset itineraries or maps”? What if the goal is “to lose one’s way”—in order to find what really matters?

So, those of you who are uncertain, I am talking to you. You are not at the end or at the beginning; you are in the middle, you are always in the middle—the messy middle, muddling through and that is the wonder of it all. And if it is a mess, it is a queer mess, filled with potential and possibility—a colorful and rich and excessive one—it is all of the things, and too much of them all. And if it is a failure, it is your own splendid one, a life lived collectively, with each other, bent away from success measured and monitored and tracked by the growth charts of the normative order. It is your life, for you and those you love—and this life, lived sideways, the study with others, a world for everyone, is what I want and I hope for you all.

How is it that you will live otherwise? What alternatives, large and small, will you learn, make, build, dream?

I can’t wait to see.

President Roth Makes Remarks at 2019 Commencement

President's Remarks

President Michael Roth ’78 delivered remarks during Wesleyan’s 187th Commencement ceremony on May 26.

Wesleyan President Michael Roth ’78 made the following remarks (as prepared) during the 187th Commencement ceremony on Sunday, May 26:

Members of the Board of Trustees, members of the faculty and staff, distinguished guests, new recipients of graduate degrees and the mighty Class of 2019, I am honored to present some brief remarks on the occasion of this Commencement.

I’d like to ask those graduating today to remember the months before you left for college. Do you recall the excitement, nervousness, and anticipation you felt when you first arrived on campus? Meeting your roommates for the first time, getting your first pail from WesWings, discovering that watching volleyball can be terrifically exciting? As your Wesleyan adventure was beginning and your life was changing, the political life of this nation was also changing, though not for the better. Would-be leaders were abandoning the debate of issues in favor of nastiness and name calling, as they tried to figure out how to energize the base of their respective constituencies. The search for coherent policies, for value-driven strategies, or for pragmatic solutions took a back seat to intemperate appeals to racism, class resentment, divisiveness, and greed. Now, in 2019, the goal of mobilizing supporters with rage has been cemented into our national political culture. That’s the culture you now graduate into; that’s the culture we need your help fixing. The post-fascists tell us inquiry and persuasion no longer matter; we need your help in proving them wrong; we need your help in overcoming their corrosive, corrupt, and cynical point of view.

And with what you have learned here and skills you have gained, you CAN help. Some of you have studied government, others economics, while still others have taken a humanistic approach to comprehending how power, justice, and opportunity might be distributed more fairly, even more compassionately. Data analysts, like those who have worked with the Wesleyan Media Project, have illuminated the ways political communication is influenced by funding and by diverse technological platforms. Ethnographers, like those who have worked with our activist Anthropology faculty, have learned how to listen to and tell the stories of those most affected by policies otherwise made without their input. There is also a more general frame of mind cultivated at Wesleyan that is crucial to political life: and that is the openness to being persuaded to change one’s mind—to seek out those from whom you can gain new perspectives and ideas precisely because they don’t share your point of view. A campus is the place to have one’s ways of thinking tested—not just protected. If we are to repair our public life, we must develop habits of mind and spirit that allow us not just to celebrate diversity, but to learn from difference.

One of the reasons I love being president of our school is that I learn so much from the enthusiasms, the convictions, and the reasoned arguments of our students. Over the last four years, I have been energized by the hard work of activists aiming to eradicate the persistent poison of sexual violence, and I have been schooled by students who have faced up to the immense challenges of combating climate change, or who struggle against economic inequality. Students of faith have shown me how religious practice and rigorous inquiry can be combined, and conservative students have taught me to be mindful that even well-intentioned policies can undermine our freedoms. There have been many times when our campus community seems to come together in recognition of unjust situations that need fixing, but it has also been clear that there can be plenty of disagreement about what would constitute effective solutions that don’t themselves create even graver injustices. On our best days, we are able to explore our differences without fear; on our best days, we are able to work toward positive change with courage.

Now, as you take on new challenges beyond the University, we are counting on you. We are counting on you to reject the dismissal of norms for telling the truth and the labeling of anything one doesn’t like as “Fake” or as “Inappropriate.” We are counting on you to protect the freedom to think for oneself and to speak one’s mind, especially in situations where people disagree. We are counting on you to show others the power of listening to those with whom you have conflicts. We are counting on you to move beyond accumulating online followers to earning the respect of strangers—turning them into neighbors, teammates, friends who can work together.

Over these four years, I have gotten to know many of you in my classes, in student government, and even in demonstrations. In your courageous company I feel we may well be able to reject the cynical status quo that mobilizes rage, that we may be able to build a politics and a culture of compassionate solidarity rather than of fear and divisiveness.

Generations of Wesleyan alumni have benefited from this campus culture characterized by brave, practical idealism. As I say each year, we Wesleyans have used our education for the ‘good of the world,’ lest the future be shaped by those for whom justice and change, generosity and equality, diversity and tolerance, are much too threatening. Now we alumni are counting on you, Class of 2019, to join us in helping to shape our culture, so that it will not be shaped by the forces of violence, conformity, and elitism.

We are counting on you because we have already seen what you are capable of when you have the freedom and the tools, the mentors and the friendships, the insight and the affection to go beyond what others have defined as your limits. We know that in the years ahead you will explore unfamiliar realms and see possibilities that others might not. We know that you will find new ways to make connections across cultural borders—new ways to build community. When this happens, you will feel the power and promise of your education. And we, your Wesleyan family, we will be proud of how you keep your education alive by making it effective in the world.

It’s been nearly four years since we unloaded cars together at the base of Foss Hill, four years since parents shed (or maybe hid) a tear as they left you here “on your own.” It seems like such a short time ago. Now it’s you who are leaving us, but do remember that no matter how “on your own” you feel yourselves to be “out there,” you will always be members of the Wesleyan family. Wherever your exciting pursuits take you, please come home to alma mater often to share your news, your memories, and your dreams. Thank you and good luck!

Rev. Edwin Sanders ’69 Makes Remarks at 2019 Commencement

Sanders speaking

Rev. Edwin Sanders II ’69 received an honorary degree naming him an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters during Commencement, May 26.

Reverend Edwin C. Sanders II ’69 and Wesleyan President Michael Roth

Reverend Edwin C. Sanders II ’69 and Wesleyan President Michael Roth

The Reverend Edwin C. Sanders II ’69 is the senior servant and founder of Metropolitan Interdenominational Church (established 1981) in Nashville, Tennessee. An anthropology major while at Wesleyan, Rev. Sanders began his career as co-director of Wesleyan’s African American Institute, later serving on Wesleyan’s Board of Trustees and receiving the University’s Distinguished Alumnus Award in 2014. He pursued graduate studies at Yale’s and Vanderbilt’s divinity schools, has been a member of advisory committees and councils for the Clinton, Bush, and Obama administrations, and has spoken at numerous international AIDS conferences. Rev. Sanders is the founding chair and current ambassador of the HIV Vaccine Trails Network Legacy Project Advisory Group designed to increase the participation of African Americans, Latinos, and Asian Pacific Islanders in HIV vaccine studies; and he serves on the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Scientific Advisory Board and the Boards of National Minority AIDS Council (NMAC), the Drug Policy Alliance, and the Black AIDS Institute.

Sanders’s speech is below:

When I think about the Class of 1969, of which I was a part, I realize that perhaps we have come a long way and there are some majors ways in which the experience here at Wesleyan helped to shape the responses we have been able to bring forth in many arenas. I won’t even begin to try to enumerate the many arenas in which we have come to play roles in professional life, as well as community life, and that allow us to be true citizens of the world. But I would say this to you: what we discovered in the relationship to developing our consciousness would allow us to be the ones who would promote and advance social justice for all people–that is something that we did a job of trying to develop in the mid-60s. Today, the 21st century realities that we face probably demand a kind of appreciation or a social justice consciousness that is equally great to that which we had 50 years ago.

When I think about celebrating the fact that we now have a department of African American studies [applause] that has been initiated on this campus, I’m excited, I’m thrilled, but I want you to know that I also have to realize that it is the demand that we made 50 years ago. And I pray that it will not be your 50th reunion before you see many of the other things that you know are a part of what will make this place that we have come to refer to very often as “Diversity University” the place that really represents the level of inclusiveness and welcome that takes us to new levels. And our years at Wesleyan are of major significance, especially as relates to developing the social justice consciousness that is necessary to address our 21st century realities.

Four hundred years ago, the horror of slavery became a defining moment in the history of this country. In 1831, this institution was established, and even though from the beginning there have been some gestures to correct the social sickness of racism, it was not until 1965 that the bold step of inclusion, which allows me to be able to stand here today, was taken. There are many such steps that still have to be taken.

I am honored to represent this era and I pray that this day will represent a day of rededication, a day of reconsecration, a day of new awareness, appreciation, and understanding of the power each and every one of us can bring to bear in the arenas of life that will be before us. And I pray that the academic environment at Wesleyan University will promote and encourage agents of truth and change, and that that is something that will never be dissipated. I can never begin to call all the names of all of those who have been a part of my life as a result of classroom experiences and relationships I have had here. But one thing I do know is that as we go forward, the experiences that you’ve had, those who have encouraged you, those who allowed you to become aware of the things that too often get swept under the rug and not dealt with forthrightly in institutions of higher learning, are things that you will carry with you.

I’m going to leave one thing that I would have you carry with you. I must admit I picked up the Wesleyan songbook the other day and I found myself realizing that I really don’t know any of those songs [laughter]. But there were songs that we sang and one of those songs I want to sing with you right now. I want to encourage you to sing it, and if there are those that are bold enough and believe enough in it, I’m sure you will sing it with me. A few years ago, an honorary degree was conferred upon Bernice Reagon, who most of you all know for her work with Sweet Honey and the Rock. So, if you will and if you feel it’s part of something you can embrace, sing with me and if you want to be bold enough, you can stand while you sing the simple words I pray you’ll carry with you (even if you never learned any of the songs in the Wesleyan songbook). The song simply says:

[singing] “We who believe in freedom cannot rest until it comes.”

Morreale ’19 Delivers Senior Class Welcome

Senior Address 2019

Sam Morreale ’19 delivered the Senior Class Welcome during Commencement, May 26.

Samuel Morreale ’19, a Science in Society and theater double major, delivered the Senior Class Welcome during Wesleyan’s 187th Commencement ceremony on May 26. The text of his remarks as prepared are below:

For me, and many others, Wesleyan has been a space of refuge and respite; it has been a place of escape. My experience here has allowed movement from a place of confinement to a place of “freedom.” I’m not naive; I know I am not truly free and probably won’t ever be. Truth is that I escaped one type of confinement only to enter another. But the space afforded me by this institution offers its own type of liberation. I am a poor, queer, black/brown, first-generation student who is the son of recent immigrants. In many ways, I was not meant to end up here, nor am I welcome. My displacement at Wesleyan is and has been felt every day. Yet the opportunity Wesleyan has offered is clear. Because of this space I now have the power to name—a power that is as liberating as it is controlling. My Wesleyan education has given me the opportunity to take a critical view of myself, the labels I am given, the narratives I am ‘meant’ to live, the narratives you are ‘meant’ to live, and have the power (or at least the illusion of power) to refuse or accept any of it. Thinking with Saidiya Hartman, Wesleyan has given me the space to imagine my own realities—my own histories—by recognizing the histories before me as presented to control where my own history can go. Before Wesleyan, the course of my life was linear, unquestioning, and controlled by a greater social system I was not privy to understand. After Wesleyan, these things may all still be true! BUT now I am filled with defined questions, anger, passion, ambition, and ability to recognize where this social system mediates my life. I have a determination to use this newfound power graced by Wesleyan to make more space for myself and for others, and I hope that the Class of 2019 will offer the same space to the education we have been afforded.

As much as it might try, Wesleyan is not a bubble. Our experiences here were defined by those that came before. Those experiences gathered here, danced with one another, and then transformed into what they are now. Just as when we began, these experiences will now carry us into our future moments. My question then is how to do justice to the future we are being propelled toward? How do we do justice to the immense privilege of this education? My offering to the class of 2019 and all who have touched it—Take a moment to alienate yourself. Recognize your body as it is placed in a collective of others. Recognize the stories that have been afforded space. Then move with purpose. Hold on to the many definitions of activism that we have been taught here, and mobilize them wherever you go, remembering that activism is a daily practice in the most mundane sense. We have all been given a space on this campus that many aren’t even offered the opportunity to fathom. Let the pressure of that fact and its reality weigh on you. What I am asking for is a conscious presence in interaction and interrelation that might minimize the violence which we all perpetuate in this system. In this pursuit, I see joy and I feel placed.

 

Members of Women’s LAX Team Graduate Early Due to NCAA Play

Graduation came early this year for women’s lacrosse players. With the team competing in the NCAA championship game on Commencement Sunday, graduating students missed the regular ceremony. The graduating seniors received their degrees at a special ceremony at the Office of Admission, attended by President Roth, Provost Joyce Jacobsen, family, friends, and faculty on Wednesday, May 22.

The seniors include Caitlin Wood, Emilie Ogden-Fung, Caroline Sgaglione, Amy Breitfeller, Abigail Horst, and Breanna Cavanaugh.

In addition, Nelson Albino, assistant women’s basketball coach, husband of Head Women’s Lacrosse Coach Kim Williams, received a Masters of Arts in Liberal Studies (MALS) degree during the ceremony. (Photos by Jonas Powell ’18, MA ’19)

Students Celebrate 2018-19 Leadership Prizes, Fellowships, Scholarships at Reception

Edelina Marzouk '19 won an Outstanding Collaboration Award and a Scott Biomedical Prize for demonstrating excellence and interest in commencing a career in academic or applied medicine. Emma Distler '19 won the Scott Prize-Italian for excellence in modern languages. Jordan Legaspi '19 won a Fulbright English Teaching Assistant Award.

Edelina Marzouk ’19 won an Outstanding Collaboration Award and a Scott Biomedical Prize for demonstrating excellence and interest in commencing a career in academic or applied medicine. Emma Distler ’19 won the Scott Prize-Italian for excellence in modern languages. Jordan Legaspi ’19 won a Fulbright English Teaching Assistant Award.

On May 8, the Office of Student Affairs hosted a reception honoring students who received academic or leadership prizes, fellowships, and scholarships in 2018–19.

More than 315 students and recent alumni received one of the University’s 180 prizes. (View the list below or on the Student Affairs website.)

Scholarships, fellowships, and leadership prizes are granted to students and student organizations based on criteria established for each prize or award. Certain University prizes are administered by the Student Affairs/Deans’ Office, while others are administered by the Office of Student Activities and Leadership Development (SALD).

Students Honored at 7th Annual Scholar-Athlete Dinner

On May 2, the Wesleyan Athletics Department honored 169 student-athletes for their excellence in athletic competition, combined with their outstanding work in the classroom. The seventh Annual Scholar-Athlete Dinner took place inside Beckham Hall at Fayerweather.

The ceremony began with comments from Director of Athletics, Mike Whalen ’83, as well as President Michael Roth, and an invocation by Father Bill Wallace preceded dinner.

Wesleyan honored men’s soccer alum Andrew Lacy ’89 with the Cardinal Award, which is chosen by the Athletic Advisory Council and presented annually to an individual with extraordinary contributions and dedication to the success of Wesleyan Athletics. Additionally, Chad Malinowski of men’s ice hockey and lacrosse, and Victoria Yu of women’s tennis received the Maynard Awards, which is presented annually to the Wesleyan male and female senior Scholar-Athlete who best exemplifies the spirit, accomplishments, and humility of Roger Maynard ’37. The dinner concluded with speeches from seniors Jordan Bonner of men’s basketball and Sarah Goss of women’s ice hockey. View photos below or in this full photo gallery on the Wesleyan Athletics Flickr site.

On May 2, Wesleyan Athletics celebrated its student-athletes and coaches at the seventh annual Scholar-Athlete Dinner in Beckham Hall. (Photos by Tom Dzimian)

On May 2, Wesleyan Athletics celebrated its student-athletes and coaches at the seventh annual Scholar-Athlete Dinner in Beckham Hall. (Photos by Tom Dzimian)

Women's cross country team.

Women’s cross country team