Tag Archive for Class of 2019

Psychology Faculty, Students, Alumni Present Research at CDS Meeting

Professor of Psychology Hilary Barth and Kerry Brew BA '18, MA '19 were among a large group of Wesleyan faculty, students, and alumni who recently presented research at the 2019 CDS Biennial meeting.

Professor of Psychology Hilary Barth, right, and Kerry Brew ’18, MA ’19, left, were among a large group of Wesleyan faculty, students, and alumni who recently presented research at the 2019 Cognitive Development Society biennial meeting.

Numerous students, alumni, and faculty from Wesleyan’s Cognitive Development Labs recently presented their research at the 2019 Cognitive Development Society biennial meeting, held Oct. 17–19 in Louisville, Ky. The labs are led by Professor of Psychology Hilary Barth and Associate Professor of Psychology Anna Shusterman.

Barth and Kerry Brew ’18, MA ’19 presented their poster, “Do Demand Characteristics Contribute to Minimal Ingroup Bias?” The work was done in collaboration with lab alumni Taylar Clark ’19 and Jordan Feingold-Link ’18.

Sophie Charles '20, former lab coordinator Alexandra Zax, and lab coordinator Katherine Williams presented their poster on "The Role of Digit Identity in 5- to 8-year-olds' numerical estimates."

Sophie Charles ’20, former lab coordinator Alexandra Zax, and lab coordinator Katherine Williams presented their poster on “The Role of Digit Identity in 5- to 8-year-olds’ numerical estimates.”

Sophie Charles ’20, lab coordinator Katherine Williams, and former lab coordinator Alexandra Zax presented their poster, “The Role of Digit Identity in 5- to 8-year-olds’ numerical estimates.” Barth also contributed to this work.

In addition, many alumni of the Cognitive Development Labs presented at the conference, including Vivian Liu ’18 (now at New York University); Dominic Gibson ’10 (now at University of Chicago); Rebecca Peretz-Lange ’13 (now at Tufts University); Andrew Ribner ’14 (now at University of Pittsburgh); Julia Leonard ’11 (now at University of Pennsylvania); and Ariel Starr ’07 (now at University of Washington). Former lab coordinators Jessica Taggart, Talia Berkowitz, Ilona Bass, and Sona Kumar, and former postdoc Emily Slusser also presented work.

 

 

Paper on Bacteria Adhesion Named “Editor’s Pick” by Journal of Biological Chemistry

Rich Olson

Rich Olson

Katherine Kaus PhD '18

Katherine Kaus

A paper written by Associate Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry Rich Olson and his former students was designated as an “Editor’s Pick” by the Journal of Biological Chemistry. Only 2% of the approximately 6,600 papers published each year in the journal receive this designation.

Titled “The 1.9 Å crystal structure of the extracellular matrix protein Bap1 from Vibrio cholerae provides insights into bacterial biofilm adhesion,” the paper, published on Oct. 4, explores how bacteria “glues” itself to surfaces in the environment. The co-authors include Alison Biester ’19, Ethan Chupp ’18, Jianyi Lu ’17, Charlie Visudharomn ’17 and Katherine Kaus PhD ’18. Kaus, who is first author on the paper, is featured in a special profile on the JBC website.

Bacteria commonly form structures called biofilms, which are communities of living cells encapsulated by a three-dimensional matrix of secreted proteins, nucleic acids, and carbohydrates. Biofilms are a defense mechanism against environmental challenges and play a role in many pathogenic diseases.

Khamis Speaks on Labor Markets

Melanie Khamis

Melanie Khamis

Melanie Khamis, associate professor of economics, recently presented two talks.

On Sept. 2, Khamis discussed “Migration and the Labor Market: New Evidence from Mexico” at the Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies at Yale University’s MacMillan Center.

On Sept. 20, she presented a paper titled “Personality, Gender, and the Labor Market” at the European Association of Labor Economists in Uppsala, Sweden. The paper addresses the topic of the effects of personality traits, both controlling for gender and interacting with gender, on labor market-related choices and outcomes.

Coauthors of the paper include Giovanni Hutchinson ’19 and Joyce Jacobsen, former Wesleyan provost and Andrews Professor of Economics.

Wesleyan Celebrates Historic 2018-19 Athletic Season

Women's tennis celebrating the 2019 National Championship (photo by Jamie Schwaberow).

Women’s tennis celebrating the 2019 National Championship (photo by Jamie Schwaberow).

After a historic 2017-18 campaign that featured the University’s first national team championship (men’s lacrosse) and a record-setting five-time individual champion in tennis (Eudice Chong ’18), the Cardinals raised the bar once again this past year with arguably the greatest all-around season in Wesleyan Athletics history.

The 2018-19 campaign was highlighted by the women’s tennis team winning the National Championship–becoming the first women’s team ever at Wesleyan to claim a national title–while Ivie Uzamere ’21 of the women’s track and field team won the National Championship in the weight throw at the NCAA Division III Indoor Track and Field Championships.

Wesleyan’s women’s teams led the way this past year with historic performances across the board. The women’s tennis team won its first-ever Little Three Championship and first-ever NESCAC title before reaching the NCAA Tournament and hosting the first, second, and third rounds for the first time in program history. After cruising through the regional rounds and the quarterfinals, the Cardinals upset the top-ranked team in the country, Emory, 5-4 to advance to the championship match. In the Finals, Wesleyan earned another thrilling upset when sophomore Polina Kiseleva prevailed in the final match as the Cardinals defeated the defending national champions and No. 2 Claremont-Mudd-Scripps, 5-4.

Members of the Class of 2019 Inducted into Phi Beta Kappa

PBK

On May 25, members of the Class of 2019 were inducted into Wesleyan’s Gamma Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa Society, the oldest national scholastic honor society. The Wesleyan Gamma Chapter was organized in 1845 and is the ninth-oldest chapter in the country.

To be elected, a student must first have been nominated by the department of his or her major. The student also must have demonstrated curricular breadth by having met the General Education Expectations and must have achieved a GPA of 93 and above.

Phi Beta Kappa is the oldest surviving Greek letter society in America, founded in December 1776 by five students who attended the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. The emblem contains the three Greek letters “Phi-Beta-Kappa,” which are the initials of the Greek motto, Philosophia Biou Kybernetes. This essentially means “the love of wisdom is the guide of life.”

The spring 2019 inductees are:

Caroline Adams
Yulia Alexandr
Erin Angell
William Bellamy
Cara Bendich
Zachary Bennett
Chiara Bercu
Sophie Brett-Chin
Nicholas Byers
David Cabanero
Talia Cohen
John Cote 

Wesleyan in the News

NewsIn this recurring feature in The Wesleyan Connection, we highlight some of the latest news stories about Wesleyan and our alumni.

Wesleyan in the News

1. The Morning Call: “Allen Student Wins ‘Hamilton’ Scholarship, Congrats from Lin-Manuel Miranda”

Anna Tjeltveit of Allentown, Penn., winner of the 2019 Wesleyan University Hamilton Prize for Creativity, is profiled. She shares how her winning submission, a one-act play titled, “Five Steps,” came together at the last minute, and discusses her early career in theater as well as her plans for her time at Wesleyan.

2. WJLA: “Arlington Teen Wins ‘Hamilton’ Prize Gets a Shout Out from Lin-Manuel Miranda”

Cole Goco of Arlington, Va., who received an honorable mention in the 2019 Wesleyan University Hamilton Prize for Creativity, is interviewed. He discusses his years-long work on his winning web comic strip, “Billy the Pop,” and what it felt like to have Lin-Manuel Miranda ’02 congratulate him by name on Twitter.

Scholarship Supports Graduate Study at Oxford for Mundangepfupfu ’19

Keith Mundangepfupfu '19

Keith Mundangepfupfu ’19

Zimbabwe native Keith Mundangepfupfu ’19, a College of Social Studies major and African studies minor, is the recipient of a scholarship through the Oxford-Weidenfeld and Hoffmann Scholarships and Leadership Programme.

The scholarship will fund full course fees and living costs at St. Antony’s College at Oxford.

The Weidenfeld-Hoffmann Scholarship supports “leaders of tomorrow by providing outstanding university graduates and young professionals from developing countries and emerging economies with the opportunity to pursue fully-funded graduate studies, combined with a specially created program of leadership development, long-term mentoring and networking.”

At St. Antony’s, Mundangepfupfu will pursue a Master of Science in migration studies, focusing on the immigration of Zimbabweans to South Africa and how they interact with the law, specifically LGBTQ+ Zimbabwean immigrants. 

Wesleyan Awards 763 BA Degrees at 187th Commencement


Graduates, their families, and other members of the Wesleyan community gathered on Andrus Field for the 187th Commencement ceremony on warm, sunny Sunday, May 26. Wesleyan conferred 763 bachelor of arts degrees; 44 master of arts degrees; 22 master of arts in liberal studies degrees; and 11 doctor of philosophy degrees. (Watch the entire Commencement ceremony online here.)

Saidiya Hartman ’84, professor of English and comparative literature and women’s and gender studies at Columbia University, delivered the Commencement address

Senior Voices: Tostado, Young, Erodici Reflect on Their Years at Wes

Vanessa Tostado Senior Voices

“Senior Voices” was held at Memorial Chapel on May 25.

As part of the 2019 Commencement weekend festivities, graduating seniors reflected on their unique and transformative Wesleyan experiences during the “Senior Voices” event held May 25 in Memorial Chapel. In addition to the speeches, this year’s event also included a farewell song, “Irish Friendship Wish,” performed by Maria Rodriguez-Castro ’19, Joy Adedokun ’19, and Olivia Backal-Balik ’20.

Seniors Vanessa Tostado, Kati Young, and Matthew Erodici spoke of the changes they had undergone during their years at Wesleyan and the community and support that they found while here. Associate Professor of American Studies and Anthropology Margot Weiss provided the faculty address, encouraging students to embrace “growth that takes unexpected and novel forms, that moves and spreads . . . unpredictable, unruly, creative.”

President Roth Makes Remarks at 2019 Commencement

President's Remarks

President Michael Roth ’78 delivered remarks during Wesleyan’s 187th Commencement ceremony on May 26.

Wesleyan President Michael Roth ’78 made the following remarks (as prepared) during the 187th Commencement ceremony on Sunday, May 26:

Members of the Board of Trustees, members of the faculty and staff, distinguished guests, new recipients of graduate degrees and the mighty Class of 2019, I am honored to present some brief remarks on the occasion of this Commencement.

I’d like to ask those graduating today to remember the months before you left for college. Do you recall the excitement, nervousness, and anticipation you felt when you first arrived on campus? Meeting your roommates for the first time, getting your first pail from WesWings, discovering that watching volleyball can be terrifically exciting? As your Wesleyan adventure was beginning and your life was changing, the political life of this nation was also changing, though not for the better. Would-be leaders were abandoning the debate of issues in favor of nastiness and name calling, as they tried to figure out how to energize the base of their respective constituencies. The search for coherent policies, for value-driven strategies, or for pragmatic solutions took a back seat to intemperate appeals to racism, class resentment, divisiveness, and greed. Now, in 2019, the goal of mobilizing supporters with rage has been cemented into our national political culture. That’s the culture you now graduate into; that’s the culture we need your help fixing. The post-fascists tell us inquiry and persuasion no longer matter; we need your help in proving them wrong; we need your help in overcoming their corrosive, corrupt, and cynical point of view.

And with what you have learned here and skills you have gained, you CAN help. Some of you have studied government, others economics, while still others have taken a humanistic approach to comprehending how power, justice, and opportunity might be distributed more fairly, even more compassionately. Data analysts, like those who have worked with the Wesleyan Media Project, have illuminated the ways political communication is influenced by funding and by diverse technological platforms. Ethnographers, like those who have worked with our activist Anthropology faculty, have learned how to listen to and tell the stories of those most affected by policies otherwise made without their input. There is also a more general frame of mind cultivated at Wesleyan that is crucial to political life: and that is the openness to being persuaded to change one’s mind—to seek out those from whom you can gain new perspectives and ideas precisely because they don’t share your point of view. A campus is the place to have one’s ways of thinking tested—not just protected. If we are to repair our public life, we must develop habits of mind and spirit that allow us not just to celebrate diversity, but to learn from difference.

One of the reasons I love being president of our school is that I learn so much from the enthusiasms, the convictions, and the reasoned arguments of our students. Over the last four years, I have been energized by the hard work of activists aiming to eradicate the persistent poison of sexual violence, and I have been schooled by students who have faced up to the immense challenges of combating climate change, or who struggle against economic inequality. Students of faith have shown me how religious practice and rigorous inquiry can be combined, and conservative students have taught me to be mindful that even well-intentioned policies can undermine our freedoms. There have been many times when our campus community seems to come together in recognition of unjust situations that need fixing, but it has also been clear that there can be plenty of disagreement about what would constitute effective solutions that don’t themselves create even graver injustices. On our best days, we are able to explore our differences without fear; on our best days, we are able to work toward positive change with courage.

Now, as you take on new challenges beyond the University, we are counting on you. We are counting on you to reject the dismissal of norms for telling the truth and the labeling of anything one doesn’t like as “Fake” or as “Inappropriate.” We are counting on you to protect the freedom to think for oneself and to speak one’s mind, especially in situations where people disagree. We are counting on you to show others the power of listening to those with whom you have conflicts. We are counting on you to move beyond accumulating online followers to earning the respect of strangers—turning them into neighbors, teammates, friends who can work together.

Over these four years, I have gotten to know many of you in my classes, in student government, and even in demonstrations. In your courageous company I feel we may well be able to reject the cynical status quo that mobilizes rage, that we may be able to build a politics and a culture of compassionate solidarity rather than of fear and divisiveness.

Generations of Wesleyan alumni have benefited from this campus culture characterized by brave, practical idealism. As I say each year, we Wesleyans have used our education for the ‘good of the world,’ lest the future be shaped by those for whom justice and change, generosity and equality, diversity and tolerance, are much too threatening. Now we alumni are counting on you, Class of 2019, to join us in helping to shape our culture, so that it will not be shaped by the forces of violence, conformity, and elitism.

We are counting on you because we have already seen what you are capable of when you have the freedom and the tools, the mentors and the friendships, the insight and the affection to go beyond what others have defined as your limits. We know that in the years ahead you will explore unfamiliar realms and see possibilities that others might not. We know that you will find new ways to make connections across cultural borders—new ways to build community. When this happens, you will feel the power and promise of your education. And we, your Wesleyan family, we will be proud of how you keep your education alive by making it effective in the world.

It’s been nearly four years since we unloaded cars together at the base of Foss Hill, four years since parents shed (or maybe hid) a tear as they left you here “on your own.” It seems like such a short time ago. Now it’s you who are leaving us, but do remember that no matter how “on your own” you feel yourselves to be “out there,” you will always be members of the Wesleyan family. Wherever your exciting pursuits take you, please come home to alma mater often to share your news, your memories, and your dreams. Thank you and good luck!

Rev. Edwin Sanders ’69 Makes Remarks at 2019 Commencement

Sanders speaking

Rev. Edwin Sanders II ’69 received an honorary degree naming him an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters during Commencement, May 26.

Reverend Edwin C. Sanders II ’69 and Wesleyan President Michael Roth

Reverend Edwin C. Sanders II ’69 and Wesleyan President Michael Roth

The Reverend Edwin C. Sanders II ’69 is the senior servant and founder of Metropolitan Interdenominational Church (established 1981) in Nashville, Tennessee. An anthropology major while at Wesleyan, Rev. Sanders began his career as co-director of Wesleyan’s African American Institute, later serving on Wesleyan’s Board of Trustees and receiving the University’s Distinguished Alumnus Award in 2014. He pursued graduate studies at Yale’s and Vanderbilt’s divinity schools, has been a member of advisory committees and councils for the Clinton, Bush, and Obama administrations, and has spoken at numerous international AIDS conferences. Rev. Sanders is the founding chair and current ambassador of the HIV Vaccine Trails Network Legacy Project Advisory Group designed to increase the participation of African Americans, Latinos, and Asian Pacific Islanders in HIV vaccine studies; and he serves on the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Scientific Advisory Board and the Boards of National Minority AIDS Council (NMAC), the Drug Policy Alliance, and the Black AIDS Institute.

Sanders’s speech is below:

When I think about the Class of 1969, of which I was a part, I realize that perhaps we have come a long way and there are some majors ways in which the experience here at Wesleyan helped to shape the responses we have been able to bring forth in many arenas. I won’t even begin to try to enumerate the many arenas in which we have come to play roles in professional life, as well as community life, and that allow us to be true citizens of the world. But I would say this to you: what we discovered in the relationship to developing our consciousness would allow us to be the ones who would promote and advance social justice for all people–that is something that we did a job of trying to develop in the mid-60s. Today, the 21st century realities that we face probably demand a kind of appreciation or a social justice consciousness that is equally great to that which we had 50 years ago.

When I think about celebrating the fact that we now have a department of African American studies [applause] that has been initiated on this campus, I’m excited, I’m thrilled, but I want you to know that I also have to realize that it is the demand that we made 50 years ago. And I pray that it will not be your 50th reunion before you see many of the other things that you know are a part of what will make this place that we have come to refer to very often as “Diversity University” the place that really represents the level of inclusiveness and welcome that takes us to new levels. And our years at Wesleyan are of major significance, especially as relates to developing the social justice consciousness that is necessary to address our 21st century realities.

Four hundred years ago, the horror of slavery became a defining moment in the history of this country. In 1831, this institution was established, and even though from the beginning there have been some gestures to correct the social sickness of racism, it was not until 1965 that the bold step of inclusion, which allows me to be able to stand here today, was taken. There are many such steps that still have to be taken.

I am honored to represent this era and I pray that this day will represent a day of rededication, a day of reconsecration, a day of new awareness, appreciation, and understanding of the power each and every one of us can bring to bear in the arenas of life that will be before us. And I pray that the academic environment at Wesleyan University will promote and encourage agents of truth and change, and that that is something that will never be dissipated. I can never begin to call all the names of all of those who have been a part of my life as a result of classroom experiences and relationships I have had here. But one thing I do know is that as we go forward, the experiences that you’ve had, those who have encouraged you, those who allowed you to become aware of the things that too often get swept under the rug and not dealt with forthrightly in institutions of higher learning, are things that you will carry with you.

I’m going to leave one thing that I would have you carry with you. I must admit I picked up the Wesleyan songbook the other day and I found myself realizing that I really don’t know any of those songs [laughter]. But there were songs that we sang and one of those songs I want to sing with you right now. I want to encourage you to sing it, and if there are those that are bold enough and believe enough in it, I’m sure you will sing it with me. A few years ago, an honorary degree was conferred upon Bernice Reagon, who most of you all know for her work with Sweet Honey and the Rock. So, if you will and if you feel it’s part of something you can embrace, sing with me and if you want to be bold enough, you can stand while you sing the simple words I pray you’ll carry with you (even if you never learned any of the songs in the Wesleyan songbook). The song simply says:

[singing] “We who believe in freedom cannot rest until it comes.”

Morreale ’19 Delivers Senior Class Welcome

Senior Address 2019

Sam Morreale ’19 delivered the Senior Class Welcome during Commencement, May 26.

Samuel Morreale ’19, a Science in Society and theater double major, delivered the Senior Class Welcome during Wesleyan’s 187th Commencement ceremony on May 26. The text of his remarks as prepared are below:

For me, and many others, Wesleyan has been a space of refuge and respite; it has been a place of escape. My experience here has allowed movement from a place of confinement to a place of “freedom.” I’m not naive; I know I am not truly free and probably won’t ever be. Truth is that I escaped one type of confinement only to enter another. But the space afforded me by this institution offers its own type of liberation. I am a poor, queer, black/brown, first-generation student who is the son of recent immigrants. In many ways, I was not meant to end up here, nor am I welcome. My displacement at Wesleyan is and has been felt every day. Yet the opportunity Wesleyan has offered is clear. Because of this space I now have the power to name—a power that is as liberating as it is controlling. My Wesleyan education has given me the opportunity to take a critical view of myself, the labels I am given, the narratives I am ‘meant’ to live, the narratives you are ‘meant’ to live, and have the power (or at least the illusion of power) to refuse or accept any of it. Thinking with Saidiya Hartman, Wesleyan has given me the space to imagine my own realities—my own histories—by recognizing the histories before me as presented to control where my own history can go. Before Wesleyan, the course of my life was linear, unquestioning, and controlled by a greater social system I was not privy to understand. After Wesleyan, these things may all still be true! BUT now I am filled with defined questions, anger, passion, ambition, and ability to recognize where this social system mediates my life. I have a determination to use this newfound power graced by Wesleyan to make more space for myself and for others, and I hope that the Class of 2019 will offer the same space to the education we have been afforded.

As much as it might try, Wesleyan is not a bubble. Our experiences here were defined by those that came before. Those experiences gathered here, danced with one another, and then transformed into what they are now. Just as when we began, these experiences will now carry us into our future moments. My question then is how to do justice to the future we are being propelled toward? How do we do justice to the immense privilege of this education? My offering to the class of 2019 and all who have touched it—Take a moment to alienate yourself. Recognize your body as it is placed in a collective of others. Recognize the stories that have been afforded space. Then move with purpose. Hold on to the many definitions of activism that we have been taught here, and mobilize them wherever you go, remembering that activism is a daily practice in the most mundane sense. We have all been given a space on this campus that many aren’t even offered the opportunity to fathom. Let the pressure of that fact and its reality weigh on you. What I am asking for is a conscious presence in interaction and interrelation that might minimize the violence which we all perpetuate in this system. In this pursuit, I see joy and I feel placed.