Tag Archive for Freeman Scholars

Wesleyan Celebrates 23rd Year of Freeman Asian Scholars Program

On Nov. 3, Wesleyan’s Freeman Asian Scholars gathered for group photos and dinner. The Freeman Scholars Program annually provides expenses for a four-year course of study toward a BA for up to 11 exceptional Asian students from these countries and regions: the People’s Republic of China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam.

On Nov. 3, Wesleyan’s Freeman Asian Scholars gathered for group photos and dinner. The Freeman Scholars Program provides scholarships annually to 11 exceptional Asian students from these countries and regions: the People’s Republic of China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam. The Freeman Program was established in 1995 through the generosity of the Freeman family – Mansfield Freeman ’16, Houghton Freeman ’43, P’77, Hon ’93, Doreen Freeman P’77, Hon ’03 and Graeme Freeman ’77.

Class of 2017 Freeman Asian Scholars Celebrated at Reception

On May 27, the Class of 2017 Freeman Asian Scholars were honored at a reception in Daniel Family Commons. Scholars, their families, friends, advisors and alumni attended the event.

The Freeman Asian Scholarship Program provides expenses for a four-year course of study toward a bachelor’s degree for up to 11 exceptional students annually, one each from the People’s Republic of China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam.

During the event, the nine graduating Class of 2017 scholars spoke briefly about their time at Wesleyan and post-graduation plans.

Other speakers included Tracey Gardner ’96, chair of the Wesleyan Alumni Association, Trustee Saeyun D. Lee ’93, and Alice Hadler, associate dean for international student affairs; the event was organized by Gina Driscoll, associate director of alumni and parent relations.

Photo of the reception are below: (Photos by Will Barr ’18)

Freeman Asian Scholars Gather for Reception, Dinner

Wesleyann's Freeman Asian Scholars gathered for a group photo on Oct. 7.

Wesleyan’s Freeman Asian Scholars gathered for a group photo on Oct. 7.

Wesleyan’s Freeman Asian Scholars gathered for group photos, a reception and dinner Oct. 7 at the Center for the Arts. The Wesleyan Freeman Asian Scholarship Program provides full-tuition toward a bachelor’s degree for up to 11 exceptional Asian students annually from the People’s Republic of China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam.

This program was established through the generosity of the Freeman Foundation, which funded both scholarships and programming for scholars in Classes 1999 through 2017. Wesleyan will continue to enroll students from the 11 Pacific Rim countries under the Freeman name, honoring the generosity of the Freeman Foundation and family members Houghton Freeman ’43, Doreen Freeman Hon. ’03 and Graeme Freeman ’77.

The Freeman Foundation was established in 1994 through the bequest of Mansfield Freeman, a businessman, benefactor, scholar and longtime resident in Asia who was a member of the Wesleyan University Class of 1916. The New York-based Freeman Foundation’s charitable efforts are directed mainly toward bettering relationships and understanding between the United States and the countries of East Asia.

The first Wesleyan Freeman Asian Scholars enrolled at Wesleyan in September of 1995. (Photos by Caroline Kravitz ’19)

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Freeman Remembered for Supporting Asian Scholars Program at Wesleyan

Doreen Brown Freeman

Doreen Brown Freeman was born in England in 1923. She was co-trustee of the Freeman Foundation.

Doreen Brown Freeman, who together with her husband, the late Houghton “Buck” Freeman ’43, generously supported Wesleyan and especially the Freeman Asian Scholars Program, died July 12 in Honolulu.

The Freeman family, including Buck, Doreen and their son Graeme Freeman ’77, established the Freeman Foundation in 1993 after the death of Buck’s father, Mansfield Freeman, Wesleyan class of 1916, who had contributed greatly to Wesleyan’s East Asian Studies Program.

Buck Freeman was chairman of the Freeman Foundation, and Doreen was a co-trustee. They demonstrated a hands-on style of giving that ensured a personal connection with all those receiving foundation support. She was especially attentive to the Freeman Asian Scholars Program – the foundation’s landmark contribution to Wesleyan. Established in 1995 to promote cross-cultural understanding between the United States and Asia, the program provides scholarships for exceptional students from 11 East Asian countries to earn bachelor’s degrees at Wesleyan. The program has supported more than 340 students.

Doreen was instrumental in interviewing Freeman Asian Scholar candidates each year until 2010, and was an especially staunch supporter of candidates who came from challenging backgrounds with limited opportunities to study abroad. She also was particularly interested in hearing from the program’s students and alumni about the details of their lives.

“For decades the Freeman family has helped Wesleyan fulfill its mission of providing the best in liberal arts education,” said Wesleyan President Michael Roth. “We are deeply grateful for all that the foundation has done and continues to do, and we mourn the passing of Doreen, who with her husband Buck, were wonderful friends. Our hearts go out to her daughter Linda, son Graeme and their families.”

Doreen was born in England in 1923. During World War II, she proudly served in one of Britain’s women’s service corps. At American International Group (AIG) – which was co-founded by Mansfield Freeman, and where her husband later rose to the top levels of company leadership – she took the initiative to “show the ropes” to younger AIG spouses. She was an avid reader and loved novels and memoirs about Asia.

Buck and Doreen’s generosity has made an enormous impact on Wesleyan. A gift at the end of the Campaign for Liberal Learning in the 1980s jump-started construction of Bacon Field House and the new pool in the Freeman Athletic Center. They also supported the Center for East Asian Studies, the Wesleyan Fund and other special projects. Their giving made them Wesleyan’s largest donors ever.

Wesleyan awarded Doreen an honorary degree in 2003, citing her as “a philanthropist whose strong compassion springs from commitment, grit, and a backbone of steel.”

Arrangements for remembrance will be private. Letters and notes are welcome at The Freeman Foundation, 1601 East West Road, Honolulu, HI 96848.

South Korea’s Choi ’13 is a Freeman Scholar, Humanities Journal Editor

Art history major Claire Choi '13 co-founded PYXIS, a new online and print project that aims to share and celebrate student academic writing in the humanities at Wesleyan. She also plays Korean drums and learned French and German at Wesleyan.

Art history major Claire Choi ’13 co-founded PYXIS, a new online and print project that aims to share and celebrate student academic writing in the humanities at Wesleyan. She also plays Korean drums and learned French and German at Wesleyan.

Q&As with outstanding students is an occasional feature of The Wesleyan Connection. This issue we speak with Claire Seo In Choi from the Class of 2013.

Q: Claire, what are you majoring in at Wesleyan, and why?

A: I’m majoring in art history at Wesleyan. I attended art high school before I came to Wes, and have been always interested in how socio-economic and cultural circumstances have shaped artworks, so I guess it was quite a natural choice for me. Besides my major credits, I explored many different disciplines; I learned French and German, and took various courses from the College of Letters, Philosophy and Studio Art departments.

Q: Coming to Wesleyan from South Korea, what were the biggest changes you encountered?

A: The education system was one of the biggest changes I encountered. My high school curriculum was very art-centric and did not have room for students to design their own curriculums. On the other hand, Wesleyan encourages students to take the full advantage of liberal arts education and explore different courses outside one’s major. Language barrier and cultural differences were also challenging changes, but I think the people I’ve met at Wesleyan have helped me a lot to transit into a new environment.

Q: You are involved with PYXIS, a new student-run online humanities journal. What is your position in the project?

A: Earlier this year, my friends and I co-founded PYXIS. PYXIS is a new online and print project that aims to share and celebrate student academic writing in the humanities at Wesleyan. We publish peer-edited papers and thought-provoking articles, both online and in print. By doing this, we hope to establish a dialogue across the humanities